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I have a question. I know that the wood stove ash isn't the "Pot ash" in fertilizer. My question is if it is good for the soil to put it on my food plots.

Thank you for any info.
 

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Yes, it is good. Poor man's lime. Just spread it thin. If you just dump it in a pile it is too much and you won't grow anything there for a while! Spread it thin and all is well. We've done it for 50 years.
 

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I did a lot of research this spring on useing ash to adjust ph. Some major universities are encouraging its use by farmers near wood burning electric plants. They reccomend a couple of tons per acre depending on moisture content. How much will depend also on when you lay it down vs planting. I did`nt save the web addresses but spend some time and you`ll be suprised at what you find.
 

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My dad has dumped it on the garden for years and years. He dumps it in thin layers and at the very least it hasn't hurt anything growing.
 

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ever see those big fields with huge brush piles scattered around? They burn the brush then spread the ashes.
 

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It is a form of "potash" just like the ash from your fire pit. It will take a double the amount of this over bagged or commerical potash. They also recommend you get a soil test yearly ehen using this stuff.

I have asked this same question due to the price at the time and this is what I was told.
 

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My research showed it changes the ph just like lime only it does it right now! That probibly means it does`nt last long either?
 
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