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Looking at the early SLP doe season this year had put me out of my element. Does have traditionally been taken at the end of the season. This early season has left me with a lot of questions.

Which does will you target?

Is it best to take the first doe that steps out and keep a minimal impact on the area?
Do you take the shot as soon as it presents itself, or let the doe mill around with the thought that a buck my be nearby? Would taking this shot keep them out of the area for a while and screw up a chance during bow season?

Do you go for the old matriarch or the youngens? (not shooting spots)
I'm trying to help the farmer out by reducing the heard and they all eat. At the same time, i'd like to keep the does around that are better for the age structure, and balance of the herd. Which are "better" at keeping the bucks around and interested? Will any of the fawns still be nursing come mid-sept?

Would you hunt different areas than you plan on hunting in the archery season?
 

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Say My Name.
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Perhaps QDMAMAN will chime in with the hierarchical method, whereby you can pick them off one at a time, with none departing the scene, until all are dispatched.

Brachial plexus shots, starting with old mama matriarch, then moving down the hierarchy food chain until the last standing doe fawn is no more.
 

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Realistically I would suggest that you drop the first doe that presents a good shot. If you get the opportunity for more than one fine but my experience has been that waiting for the perfect opportunity is more likely to leave you with an empty bag. Better to take the sure thing.
 

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Great stuff Neal.

I'll add my thoughts but preface them with this.
I've never read a QDM anything and only speak from my experience and a little redneck common sense.

If reduction in the herd is the goal than take the oldest does you can to start.
The benefits...
A. They're more apt to stick around, the younger ones will wander.
B. They're better "Mothers" and will make adjustments with their remaining young if they see one of the twins whacked making them harder to hunt.
C. After you take the mother, the yearlings or fawns are MUCH easier to target later should you wish.

From a hunter's standpoint...a doe will chase off it's male offspring after a time to prevent natural inbreeding. That buck may travel many miles to find his own home range. Probably NOT on your property.

Now that can work both ways...if you have better cover and food than most of the surrounding area you may want the little ones gone because the bigger bucks will push them out anyway...it's prime territory.

If it's NOT the best and the farm a mile down has the habitat and food you may want him to stick around.

Again, not an expert or even very knowledgeable on the subject but this is what I've seen, or think I've seen, from my experiences.
 

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I am targeting button bucks during that season. I am hoping to help with "balanced herd reduction". :evil::evil:
Dan
 

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If population control is the idea, a Biologist friend of mine told me that you want to shoot the older does.

He claims that as does get older, they tend to have twin doe fawns as opposed to a doe and a buck fawn for the younger does.

He also claims that if doe populations are high, and not all does get breed, that the older does will chase off the younger does so that they can breed, even impacting the future buck population more.

He claims shooting the older does are more healthy for a balanced herd.
 
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