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What's more difficult. .....harvesting deer on public land. ....? Or harvesting deer on leased land. .....?

I have a buddy that wants me to get in on a lease. I told him no. Main reason is I enjoy hunting many different areas. I feel that's part of the essence of hunting! I have some private to hunt but I rarely make it out there anymore. To me, it dulls my experience going to the same spot, again, and again. ....

Just wondering how others think. .....enjoy, relish the challenge of public. .....or prefer the control, same ol same ol via lease.......
 

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In your situation theres no telling. But its quite simple to be successful with my lease partners and leases. Although, there are stateland areas that hold a ton of deer that people dont hunt.
 

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I think it can go either way. I hunted one lease this past year and didn't see a deer in daylight. On the other hand I sat on highly pressured state land after gun season and saw 12 deer in one sit.
 

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..... it all depends on relative population densities. High density, it is pretty easy to kill 'em anywhere. Low deer numbers makes things a lot more challenging either way.
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Everybody hunts for their own reasons, if you enjoy hunting several different areas of state land then it sounds like you made the right decision. Have you ever researched john eberhart ? Just my opinion but i feel he is one of the best hunters out there and he does alot of it on state land. Good luck this season hope you get a monster!!
 

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I think something to consider as well is terrain features. IE, farm land vs big woods/timber. With some farmland It's a lot easier to find funnels and travel ways. For example, I used to hunt a farm down in Eaton county. Not much in the way of woods but there was one particular fence/hedge row that funneled deer between a wood lot on neighboring property and a small lowland area on the farm we hunted. Deer would travel that at any time of the day and were a bit more predictable. I killed the buck in my avatar from that fenceline in2008. Had a blast hunting that farm.
However, I pretty much exclusively hunt the Big woods of the NELP now. Food is unpredictable therefore travel patterns tend to change some from year to year. Couple that with 100s of thousands of acres to roam and lower deer numbers and I'd say it's harder to kill a deer on public land.
But with that being said, no deer comes easy.
Just my 2¢
 

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I for one like hunting the same ol same ol property not having to worry about other people and
having a sense of security so to say. With that said - it sounds like your more of a roaming hunter
which you will get a better experience hunting state land because thats what you like to do.

Honestly - I think you answered your own question in the original post but dont look past the
opportunity for the same ol same ol. I have a great time every year and have hunted the same
3-4 stands the last 8 years. that said - I like to roam during small game season so I know what
you mean.
 

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What's more difficult. .....harvesting deer on public land. ....? Or harvesting deer on leased land. .....?

I have a buddy that wants me to get in on a lease. I told him no. Main reason is I enjoy hunting many different areas. I feel that's part of the essence of hunting! I have some private to hunt but I rarely make it out there anymore. To me, it dulls my experience going to the same spot, again, and again. ....

Just wondering how others think. .....enjoy, relish the challenge of public. .....or prefer the control, same ol same ol via lease.......
I agree with you 100%. I welcome the challenge of 100% fair chase. I know this may open up a can of worms and some may take offense to it, but that doesn't bother me. When I worked at Bass Pro Shops many years ago, guys would come in to post their kills on the "trophy board" in the front of the store. I would high five anyone who shot a mediocre six point on state land. This other guy comes in and posts a monstrous 12 point buck, like 180+ class. Asked him where he got it...says "In my back yard in Lake Orion". The guy shot it 20 yards from his house. That isn't hunting. He got all upset because I high fived someone else and just kinda gave him a "That's nice" response.

My issue isn't with people who have worked very hard to be land owners. My issue is that some of them (i.e. not all, but some) think that because they were able to purchase land (or lease land) and see a buck in the same spot and then kill it an hour into opening day...in the same spot, somehow makes them some superior hunting genius. The fact is, take some of those people out of their private secluded setting and stick them in the middle of the state forest, like 1,000 acres, they will never find deer. They couldn't tell you if that was rabbit dung or deer dung or a tick nest. They couldn't find deer sign if you paid them $1,000.

I also personally advocate a ban on food plots. Baiting is baiting. Food plots are baiting...and not hunting to me.

I for one like hunting the same ol same ol property not having to worry about other people and
having a sense of security so to say. With that said - it sounds like your more of a roaming hunter
which you will get a better experience hunting state land because thats what you like to do.

Honestly - I think you answered your own question in the original post but dont look past the
opportunity for the same ol same ol. I have a great time every year and have hunted the same
3-4 stands the last 8 years. that said - I like to roam during small game season so I know what
you mean.
I do agree that, yes, it would be nice to not have to worry about other hunters...nor worry about losing stands to theft, etc. but, I have lost less in treestand value in 15 years on state land than it would cost for a share of a hunting lease for one season.

I am not a trophy hunter. I am an experience hunter, meat hunter, etc. I welcome the challenge of adapting. Someone in my spot? I can move. I will find deer. I enjoy "the hunt".
 

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Lease 40 acres with 6 guys hunting it and tell us which is harder.
Just because you lease doesn't mean you have to spend all your time there.
Leasing can at times be basically a private piece of public land if you catch what I'm saying. Pressure has the same result everywhere.
 

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Wow, some of these responses.
Over the years I've hunted public and leased private land. I've hunted deep forest, farm country, swamps, and mountainous regions. I always managed to locate and kill deer. There's no doubt it's easier on private land 99.9% of the time.
But what's the point of this thread? Seems like the OP is making more of a statement than asking a question.
 

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All depends on the year and uncontrollable circumstances.
 

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Wow, some of these responses.
Over the years I've hunted public and leased private land. I've hunted deep forest, farm country, swamps, and mountainous regions. I always managed to locate and kill deer. There's no doubt it's easier on private land 99.9% of the time.
But what's the point of this thread? Seems like the OP is making more of a statement than asking a question.
A consistent theme on this forum is some members persist in asserting their methodology as more "challenging", "authentic", "real", etc.

Passive-aggressive comparison syndrome.
 

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I agree with you 100%. I welcome the challenge of 100% fair chase. I know this may open up a can of worms and some may take offense to it, but that doesn't bother me. When I worked at Bass Pro Shops many years ago, guys would come in to post their kills on the "trophy board" in the front of the store. I would high five anyone who shot a mediocre six point on state land. This other guy comes in and posts a monstrous 12 point buck, like 180+ class. Asked him where he got it...says "In my back yard in Lake Orion". The guy shot it 20 yards from his house. That isn't hunting. He got all upset because I high fived someone else and just kinda gave him a "That's nice" response.

My issue isn't with people who have worked very hard to be land owners. My issue is that some of them (i.e. not all, but some) think that because they were able to purchase land (or lease land) and see a buck in the same spot and then kill it an hour into opening day...in the same spot, somehow makes them some superior hunting genius. The fact is, take some of those people out of their private secluded setting and stick them in the middle of the state forest, like 1,000 acres, they will never find deer. They couldn't tell you if that was rabbit dung or deer dung or a tick nest. They couldn't find deer sign if you paid them $1,000.

I also personally advocate a ban on food plots. Baiting is baiting. Food plots are baiting...and not hunting to me.



I do agree that, yes, it would be nice to not have to worry about other hunters...nor worry about losing stands to theft, etc. but, I have lost less in treestand value in 15 years on state land than it would cost for a share of a hunting lease for one season.

I am not a trophy hunter. I am an experience hunter, meat hunter, etc. I welcome the challenge of adapting. Someone in my spot? I can move. I will find deer. I enjoy "the hunt".
Whip out the grand and let's head to the state land of your choice. There aren't many deer but I will find you a track and some deer ****. But I want the grand! I will use it to buy seed for my next food plot!
 

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I also personally advocate a ban on food plots. Baiting is baiting. Food plots are baiting...and not hunting to me.
Does this relate to the thread? Being a steward of the land is offensive to you eh? Well, FYI, I think if it takes a 225hp engine to catch a bass, you have other issues. Rowboats only pal.

For what it's worth, hunting is still hunting whether on public or private ground. I have treestands that I have not set in for the last 3 years on my private ground. My point is that I do very well in avoiding the "same ole' same ole'" game. Those stands are there for when I want to hunt those sites. And, they are VERY fresh.

Hunting is a VERY personal experience and as long as the tactics are legal then more power to you. Who are we to judge one's personal preference on hunting style?

I used to hunt the UP in late December on public ground. The challenge was tremendous to simply stay on stand and when I saw a buck it was as exciting as any buck I've ever seen.

My deduction is that ANY hunter, fisherman or outdoorsman should be constantly working to improve the pursuit and thus the end result. What I mean is, that through scouting, preparation and practice everyone is striving to "make it easy" to experience the ultimate end. Are not the very best hunts the ones that come together like a well executed plan?

It's most important to hunt, regardless of where or how.
 

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I agree with you 100%. I welcome the challenge of 100% fair chase. I know this may open up a can of worms and some may take offense to it, but that doesn't bother me. When I worked at Bass Pro Shops many years ago, guys would come in to post their kills on the "trophy board" in the front of the store. I would high five anyone who shot a mediocre six point on state land. This other guy comes in and posts a monstrous 12 point buck, like 180+ class. Asked him where he got it...says "In my back yard in Lake Orion". The guy shot it 20 yards from his house. That isn't hunting. He got all upset because I high fived someone else and just kinda gave him a "That's nice" response.

My issue isn't with people who have worked very hard to be land owners. My issue is that some of them (i.e. not all, but some) think that because they were able to purchase land (or lease land) and see a buck in the same spot and then kill it an hour into opening day...in the same spot, somehow makes them some superior hunting genius. The fact is, take some of those people out of their private secluded setting and stick them in the middle of the state forest, like 1,000 acres, they will never find deer. They couldn't tell you if that was rabbit dung or deer dung or a tick nest. They couldn't find deer sign if you paid them $1,000.

I also personally advocate a ban on food plots. Baiting is baiting. Food plots are baiting...and not hunting to me.



I do agree that, yes, it would be nice to not have to worry about other hunters...nor worry about losing stands to theft, etc. but, I have lost less in treestand value in 15 years on state land than it would cost for a share of a hunting lease for one season.

I am not a trophy hunter. I am an experience hunter, meat hunter, etc. I welcome the challenge of adapting. Someone in my spot? I can move. I will find deer. I enjoy "the hunt".
Nothing hard about piling up some corn and shooting sparky on state land. Or sitting in the oaks on public land and shooting the first thing that wonders by. Pretty easy really.
Depends on how much of challenge you want to make your hunting experience.
 

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The fact is, take some of those people out of their private secluded setting and stick them in the middle of the state forest, like 1,000 acres, they will never find deer. They couldn't tell you if that was rabbit dung or deer dung or a tick nest. They couldn't find deer sign if you paid them $1,000..
So long as we're painting with a broad brush - I can say with infinite confidence that the woodsmanship, knowledge of the trees/forbs/shrubs/grasses/soils/plant life/mammalian biology/reptiles/insects/younameit of the landowners I know who spend considerable time managing the ground upon which they hunt blows away that of typical deer hunter who hunts public land or the land of someone else. Not. Close.

I do personally know guys who hunt public ground who are quite knowledgeable about these sorts of things. They're great guys, and I salute them. And they are outliers.

For what it's worth, hunting is still hunting whether on public or private ground. I have treestands that I have not set in for the last 3 years on my private ground. My point is that I do very well in avoiding the "same ole' same ole'" game. Those stands are there for when I want to hunt those sites. And, they are VERY fresh.
Not to denigrate the rest of your fine post, lobrass, but this remark really jogs some thoughts worthy of another thread. Every year, I have some excellent stands all prepped and ready to go that never get used all season long. And sometimes for consecutive years! Oftentimes it's because you don't get the wind that site is designed for during the time of the season where you'd want to hunt it. It may seem like idle, wasted capacity. I look upon it as a temporarily underutilized asset.
 

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So long as we're painting with a broad brush - I can say with infinite confidence that the woodsmanship, knowledge of the trees/forbs/shrubs/grasses/soils/plant life/mammalian biology/reptiles/insects/younameit of they typical landowner who spends considerable time on managing the ground upon which he hunts blows away that of typical state land deer hunter. Not. Close.

I do personally know guys who hunt public ground who are quite knowledgeable about these sorts of things. They're great guys, and I salute them. And they are outliers.

You obviously missed the words SOME, NOT ALL...

And apparently struck a nerve with some.
 
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I agree with you 100%. I welcome the challenge of 100% fair chase. I know this may open up a can of worms and some may take offense to it, but that doesn't bother me. When I worked at Bass Pro Shops many years ago, guys would come in to post their kills on the "trophy board" in the front of the store. I would high five anyone who shot a mediocre six point on state land. This other guy comes in and posts a monstrous 12 point buck, like 180+ class. Asked him where he got it...says "In my back yard in Lake Orion". The guy shot it 20 yards from his house. That isn't hunting. He got all upset because I high fived someone else and just kinda gave him a "That's nice" response.

My issue isn't with people who have worked very hard to be land owners. My issue is that some of them (i.e. not all, but some) think that because they were able to purchase land (or lease land) and see a buck in the same spot and then kill it an hour into opening day...in the same spot, somehow makes them some superior hunting genius. The fact is, take some of those people out of their private secluded setting and stick them in the middle of the state forest, like 1,000 acres, they will never find deer. They couldn't tell you if that was rabbit dung or deer dung or a tick nest. They couldn't find deer sign if you paid them $1,000.

I also personally advocate a ban on food plots. Baiting is baiting. Food plots are baiting...and not hunting to me.



I do agree that, yes, it would be nice to not have to worry about other hunters...nor worry about losing stands to theft, etc. but, I have lost less in treestand value in 15 years on state land than it would cost for a share of a hunting lease for one season.

I am not a trophy hunter. I am an experience hunter, meat hunter, etc. I welcome the challenge of adapting. Someone in my spot? I can move. I will find deer. I enjoy "the hunt".
Lots of great state land hunters who know how to scout, locate bedding areas, food sources, and move about 1000's of acres of state land to find and harvest some nice bucks. Take these same great hunters and give them 15 acres of private land with garbage habitat and they will be lucky to shoot a 1.5 old buck once every 5-10 years ! Alot more to attracting and holding deer especially mature bucks than you think. Or do u just plant a food plot and the 180" deer line up for miles waiting their turn to eat out of a food plot? Lol
 

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Why would you think that participating in a lease would keep you from hunting stateland as well? You don't have to hunt the lease over and over again...hunt where ever you want whenever you want. Having a lease will give you another option...which is a good thing.
 
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