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This coming season i should have a little more time to be more serious about birds with a bow. Because of this i decided im going to use Spitfire broadheads for the job. I orginally was thinking about 85 grain spitfires so my arrow shoots a little flatter, and hopefully make up for any little misjudgements of distance. But i noticed that the "gobbler getter" versions are heavier. Im assuming this is because the blunt point needs more weight for penetration. But it made me wonder how much weight is needed to properly penetrate a bird.

For referance im shooting a 2005 diamond victory, set at 65 lbs, Goldtip arrows, and currently shooting 271 fps with 100 grain field tips.

thank you for any advice.
 

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I shoot my deer hunting rig and i dont change thing,

I shoot 73 pounds 29 inch maxims and 100 grain 4 balde muzzys!


no need for special set ups....... goiod enough for deer good enough for turkey


as for missing and yardages get a range finder! i am never ever without one whenever i hunt period no reason to not have one
 

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When I hunt turkeys with my bow I used the steel force turkey head 100gr. fly as true as my Slick tricks and made for turkeys. But for this year I going with my new 870 magnum with Federal's 3.5" 2oz. of #6 shot watch out turkey and for back up I will have my Winchester 1300 with Remingtion 3" hevi-shot either way the turkeys have no chance if they come with-in 40-50 yrds.

fulldraw
 

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If you practice with the 100 grain tips then I would choose a broadhead of the same weight. You really will not see much of a difference in arrow flight between an 85 and 100 Spitfire...if anything a little more weight at the front of the arrow is better.

The Gobbler Getters are good broadheads for birds...the blunt tip gives them a lot of shocking power, which is just as important as cutting diameter. It also keeps the arrow from passing through the bird, since all of the energy is transferred to the body. A normal broadhead does not have the same amount of shocking power as a large cut mechanical, thus reducing the chance of knocking the bird down on the spot.

If you are shooting normal broadheads for turkeys I would recommend some kind of adder point behind your broadhead. Not only will it increase the shocking power, but will also prevent the arrow from completely passing through the bird.

A Judo Adder Point...(http://www.keystonecountrystore.com/prodinfo.asp?number=PNT5720782102)



and a Bateman Adder Point...(http://www.keystonecountrystore.com/prodinfo.asp?number=PNT1230791502)

 

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Agree with Deputy. Broadhead choice isn't all that much of a factor. If you have one thats shoots well from your setup,use it. The more important issue is gonna be shot placement. That is crucial to getting the job done. Spend your time practicing, not spending your money. Save it for another call you have always wanted.
 
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