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Thanks, I thought it was but wanted to make sure. This was first time looking for them, 9lbs 10oz.
That would bring you a few dollars if you had a chef that wanted to buy it.
 
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Woods and Water Rat
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That would bring you a few dollars if you had a chef that wanted to buy it.
I am sort of against selling wild picked mushrooms, morels mostly because they are so sought after buy a lot of people. Hmmmmm

So I wonder how much you can get per pound? I mean If I hounded some spots I could get a lot of these, I mean an awful lot. I never pick em all. Just the choicest ones if I haven't been preempted by someone and that rarely has happened. I mean rather than see em go to waste..... LOL!
 

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I am sort of against selling wild picked mushrooms, morels mostly because they are so sought after buy a lot of people. Hmmmmm

So I wonder how much you can get per pound? I mean If I hounded some spots I could get a lot of these, I mean an awful lot. I never pick em all. Just the choicest ones if I haven't been preempted by someone and that rarely has happened. I mean rather than see em go to waste..... LOL!
I would guess, based on prices I have seen for wild and cultivated, that you could ask for $15 a pound and negotiate down to $10 a pound if you had to and still make some money.
 

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You have to be licensed in Michigan to sell wild mushrooms. The cost of the class & certification is around $ 185.00 I haven't heard what happens if you get caught selling without it.
 

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You have to be licensed in Michigan to sell wild mushrooms. The cost of the class & certification is around $ 185.00 I haven't heard what happens if you get caught selling without it.
A lot of business still happens out the back door.
 

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Woods and Water Rat
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You have to be licensed in Michigan to sell wild mushrooms. The cost of the class & certification is around $ 185.00 I haven't heard what happens if you get caught selling without it.
That's right, I was being facetious. Besides I'd never sell mushrooms. I'd give em away first.

A lot of business still happens out the back door.
No kidding! Makes you wonder if all those people with signs up for 'morels for sale' in the Spring are actually following the law, and if not does anybody check on it...?
 

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That's right, I was being facetious. Besides I'd never sell mushrooms. I'd give em away first.



No kidding! Makes you wonder if all those people with signs up for 'morels for sale' in the Spring are actually following the law, and if not does anybody check on it...?
The problem is the state required sellers of wild mushrooms to be certified mushroom experts, but there was no way to get certified and no one was responsible for it. Now there is a process to become certified, but that just started last spring. In fact, the first classes began barely in time for morel season. There were articles bringing to the public's attention that you had to be a certified expert to sell, but it took some mushroom groups to get the state off its butt and agree to a certification process. Way to go state government, require certification, but don't have a way to do it. Several other states began certification classes but Michigan had its head up its you-know-what.
 

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The class teaches you pretty much nothing. It's very general and is roughly 8 hours long. Upon completion of the class, the State considers you an " Expert in Wild Mushroom Identification " I'll bet all the Mycologists out there are wondering why they wasted hundreds of thousands of dollars, and years of their time to get their Degree, when they just could have taken this course........LOL
 

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I took the class and thought it was only good to weed out the folks who only knew how to ID morels and nothing else. All in all, worth it, but only for the ability to sell non morels legally
 

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Woods and Water Rat
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The class teaches you pretty much nothing. It's very general and is roughly 8 hours long. Upon completion of the class, the State considers you an " Expert in Wild Mushroom Identification " I'll bet all the Mycologists out there are wondering why they wasted hundreds of thousands of dollars, and years of their time to get their Degree, when they just could have taken this course........LOL
That is pathetic. Sure seems like it opens the door for the State to be liable for any problems on the surface of it.

I took the class and thought it was only good to weed out the folks who only knew how to ID morels and nothing else. All in all, worth it, but only for the ability to sell non morels legally
Still don't get that warm & fuzzy feeling hearing this. I also get the feeling this could lead to problems for the whole program. Sounds like just another way to get into peoples pockets.

I guess one thing is probably for sure, anyone BUYING wild mushrooms likely knows what they are after so no one should get poisoned. But it sure does appear to open the door for it, based on this information if I follow what is being said correctly.

Good info guys!
 

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I beg to differ OGman! It's a great way to expose a lot of people to some amazing new food that they would otherwise never get to experience. I figure if the chef cooks it better than I can and is making money than so should we. However, I only sell from private land... Selling from public land is not only illegal but it's like taking money from your neighbors- those are for sharing freely IMO :)
 

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I beg to differ OGman! It's a great way to expose a lot of people to some amazing new food that they would otherwise never get to experience. I figure if the chef cooks it better than I can and is making money than so should we. However, I only sell from private land... Selling from public land is not only illegal but it's like taking money from your neighbors- those are for sharing freely IMO :)
Why is it illegal? I had not heard that before.
 

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It's illegal in some parks, like Flushing County Park in Flushing. Can't remove anything including nuts, berries, wild mushrooms and wild flowers. State land you can pick. But, what's going to be next is all pickers will have to be licensed, just like out west. And limits of a gallon or two is all that can be picked. The license can cost as much as $100.00, with very stiff fines for not having it. Mostly the intent is to collect revenue from commercial pickers who make thousands of dollars off numerous states. However out of all the commercial pickers I know, not a one pays any taxes. Ask Chris Matherly how much he pays to all the states he picks and leads Forays in.
All in all, this has already been discussed in another thread. Anyway, Brick Caps & Blewets should be fruiting real soon, along with Tricholoma flavovirens, in the Pines.
 
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