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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hunting in Lake County Michigan, I'm trying to develop more habitat in a predominantly Maple and Oak tree environment. Come the later months, the woods appears almost barren due to lack of foliage. I've already started a regiment of pine tree seedlings for habitat. I also have Chestnut, apple and pear trees going. I thought due to it's thicker foliage, fruits and spreading trait of American Plum, it might be good to plant them. I would groom them to work for me as far as travel corridors, wind blocks, visual barriers etc.
A buddy of mine isn't crazy about them. He doesn't like the idea of thorny bushes! I could use some insight from other members if possible. thanks.
 

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The ***** love mine, the deer do not even touch them. All the fruit falls off at the same time and then the ***** are the only thing to eat them. They make a pretty good jam though. Cover wise they do not do much. I would not plant them at all and plant more crabs or spruce if I had to do it over again.
 

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I 2nd the motion of 357 maximum. I plated quite a few, more for Pheasant rather then deer about 20 years ago. You always see out west the hunters kicking birds out of them. They only grow about 7 feet high and do put out the runners but I am not impressed compared to what is out there. I would put in Bald Cypress from Coldstreamfarm. They keep their light purple needles on till late winter leaving gunmetal gray branches in the late winter to late spring when the green needles form. Forsythia would be another choose that grows thick if trimmed right and has the leaves on till February and still is 7 feet high barrier with the Patriarch loving the nips.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The ***** love mine, the deer do not even touch them. All the fruit falls off at the same time and then the ***** are the only thing to eat them. They make a pretty good jam though. Cover wise they do not do much. I would not plant them at all and plant more crabs or spruce if I had to do it over again.
I appreciate your input and especially from your experience. I'll look into crabs instead. I have been planting White Pine and Red Pine... a few hundred a year but wanted to change it up a bit this year something that they could use for cover, wind break and food source all in one. If you can think of anything else.. feel free to let me know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I 2nd the motion of 357 maximum. I plated quite a few, more for Pheasant rather then deer about 20 years ago. You always see out west the hunters kicking birds out of them. They only grow about 7 feet high and do put out the runners but I am not impressed compared to what is out there. I would put in Bald Cypress from Coldstreamfarm. They keep their light purple needles on till late winter leaving gunmetal gray branches in the late winter to late spring when the green needles form. Forsythia would be another choose that grows thick if trimmed right and has the leaves on till February and still is 7 feet high barrier with the Patriarch loving the nips.
I'll look into the Forsythia but as a food source, I don't know if this would rank toward the top or even the middle of the food chain so to speak. I'll do some research on that.. thanks.
 

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I'll look into the Forsythia but as a food source, I don't know if this would rank toward the top or even the middle of the food chain so to speak. I'll do some research on that.. thanks.
There is an old saying that says: "Don't put all your eggs in the same basket". With the plethora of diseases and pests coming into this country due to global trade that quote has more meaning in terms of habitat development than at any other time. FM
 

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I planted some, more for a deer browse variety and the deer will browse them pretty heavy, especially in early spring. They are a hardy tree and can take being browsed hard and rubbed. Good wood for smoking meat too :) The plums seem to drop in September for me and the deer do eat the real ripe ones. I mixed these and crabs in with some alders and willow.

I will have to plant some Forsythia too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I planted some, more for a deer browse variety and the deer will browse them pretty heavy, especially in early spring. They are a hardy tree and can take being browsed hard and rubbed. Good wood for smoking meat too :) The plums seem to drop in September for me and the deer do eat the real ripe ones. I mixed these and crabs in with some alders and willow.

I will have to plant some Forsythia too.
Thanks Chuck... I've been getting some real good advice. Experience is the best teacher! Thanks again guys.......
 
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