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Not sure if this is the right forum but here we go.

I built a house last year and did the landscaping myself in the spring. In the front I have a veragated dogwood and in the back a double weeping cherry. So far I had to replace both trees. They were getting to much water. I have a sprinkler system and have been watering the new trees for 1-2 min everyday. The trees were planted in black dirt but most of the ground around is clay. They recieve alot of sunlight and the Cherry in the back recieves alot of wind due to the fact that there is an open field in the back. I planted them correctly according to the place I bought them.

Question? what is the correct amount of water and how often do I water them? I have numerous other trees, plants, shrubs that are in the same area and they have all survived.
 

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Watering is an art rather than a science. As a rule of thumb trees and shrubs require the equivalent of an inch of water per week including rainfall. Trees and shrubs require infrequent and deeper watering than lawns which require light frequent watering. Soil types, mulch and exposure to sun and wind, and grading will affect percolation and evaporation. A mulched tree in a shaded area with clay soil will need to be watered less often than a tree in sandy soil without mulch and in full sun. Water does not move well between soils of dissimilar texture. If the trees have a sandy root ball and are planted in clay, the water will tend to run through the sand and collect in the bottom of the clay hole. The reverse is true with a clay ball in sandy soil. Water will tend to run off the ball and through the sand. Most properties are graded so water runs away from the foundation of the house. In many cases it will tend to collect in a low area, especially along a sidewalk which acts like a dam. Rate of application can make a difference as well. If you have ever driven down the street and saw water running down the curbs from someones lawn sprinklers you have witnessed someone applying water too fast, causing runoff. I would experiment by hand watering at a slow rate until the soil is moistened to a depth of 8 inches or so without being overly saturated. Keep checking to see how long it takes the soil to nearly dry out before watering again. You can purchase a soil probe or use something like a metal rod of screw driver to probe into the soil. After a couple of times doing this you should start to get a feel for how much water needs to be applied and how often. It is different for every property and situation. Hope this is helpful.
 

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why do you think they are getting to much water?

is there moss growing up the trunk? sinkholes or mudpit all around it?

i have a feeling its not to much water. did you remove the burlap from the ball? did you fertilize at all?
 
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