Michigan Sportsman Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·


I suppose its always greener. When i'm fishing Michigan i can't help but wonder what's going on in Wisconsin and when in Wisconsin, well...you know.

I hadn't been up there for awhile so we put in a weekend in the SW part of the state. The last time i was up it was pretty bare so its nice to see her with some color again. We only fished one familiar stream for a couple hours and spent the rest of the time looking at some new water.





Some spots a little tighter than others...but sometimes you never know. The pic above, i high sticked that riffle from top to bottom and pulled 7 fish out of it.









Sulphurs, olives a 3wt cane rod and hungry browns...it was a good weekend to be a fisherman.





This guy below? He was taken from the last scenic pic above. Just upstream of where the water splits around the island look for the roiling white water, can't miss it...almost stretches the entire creek. He was sitting in very tiny plunge pool to the right of the white water. I was standing on the opposite side, reached out over the white water and high sticked a nymph through it. He wasn't shy, he came right up the water column and grabbed it. Things were fine till he turned and headed downstream...he got below that island REAL quick...i was just kinda hang'en on for the ride.





Its really an amazing place and a unique fishing experience...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,775 Posts
Thanks again for the report. I love little streams like that and need to consider Wisconsin for a trip one day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
413 Posts
awesome photo's as usual...are those the average sized trout you catch there?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,598 Posts
gunrod said:
Thanks again for the report. I love little streams like that and need to consider Wisconsin for a trip one day.

If you do let me know. I've been hitting them up much more now that I'm only a few hours away from the streams Brookid posts. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I wouldn't say those are the average...but they're close. Through the course of a day you can expect to catch a handful in the 12 - 15 range...on drys or nymphs.

The interesting thing about the Wis streams is that whether its olives, midges or hendricksons...everyone comes out to play. The streams there present their own set of challenges but i find the bigger fish there will readily take a small fly.

I've spent an August morning on the West Fork of the Kickapoo fishing tricos and every brown was between 12 and 14 inches...thats never happened to me on the north branch...;)

Its a neat place...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
brookid said:
I've spent an August morning on the West Fork of the Kickapoo fishing tricos and every brown was between 12 and 14 inches...thats never happened to me on the north branch...;)
Is that because the fish on the Kickapoo haven't had as much pressure on them? So, maybe they're not as selective/intelligent about their feeding choices? Or, are there just not as many browns on the North Branch? Something else?

It's a serious question from the new guy; not trying to be facetious or flippant. Just wondering what might account for the difference in experience.

Great looking catch, by the way. Beautiful setting, too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wish i had an answer for ya...

The West Fork is a well written about TU top 100 stream...it gets HAMMERED. The bio mass is terrific and i've heard upwards of 5,000 fish per mile. I read somewhere that in some of those limestone streams they are so fertile that fish can grow five to seven inches a year.

In my experience, the day in day out average trout is bigger in Wis. I don't think its just me either. The folks that i've run into who fish both often have made similar observation....but its certainly not based on any kind of science.

Why don't the 12 - 14 inch fish in the ausable line up in numbers for midges, tricos, olives ect?. I don't know. Maybe its because there is a larger forage base ie, bait fish, smaller trout, sculpins, crayfish ect ect. and they don't bother with the smaller bugs (consistantly).

Maybe the Wis streams are more "bug" based and they are a little more opportunistic, i will say i don't see as many 3 to 5 inch fish there...but again, not terribly scientific.

I don't know but i've long wondered the same thing...
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top