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Hey guys I’ve been trying to fish for walters, once in the morning couple times near dusk and I just feel like I’m flying blind. Anyone in the area can provide guidance on what I should be doing? Tried trolling crawlers, jigging leeches, slip bobbering both etc. and I just don’t know how to get any on. I’m typically a bass fisherman so this feels all a bit new to me.


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Hey guys I’ve been trying to fish for walters, once in the morning couple times near dusk and I just feel like I’m flying blind. Anyone in the area can provide guidance on what I should be doing? Tried trolling crawlers, jigging leeches, slip bobbering both etc. and I just don’t know how to get any on. I’m typically a bass fisherman so this feels all a bit new to me.


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The inland lake walleye population can be tough to crack in SE Michigan. I fish the Portage Chain in Livingston/Washtenaw county where walleyes are stocked.
That’s the first key is to make sure you are on water with a decent walleye population. Either a lake with a river system flowing in and/or out or where stocking occurs.
I have found the walleyes in early spring either near river mouths or weed edges. Pitching blade baits, jig/minnow combos, casting or trolling small crank baits along newly emerging weed edges produces.
Late spring they seem to relate to weed edges where casting crank baits can provide good action action any time of the day.
Weed edges near water that drops to 15’ or more seem to hold fish more than shallower edges.
Summer, most of the walleyes seem to prefer to be in thicker weeds near a sharp drop or off deep water “humps”. Pitching jigs and plastics in the weeds is a good way to find walleyes in the summer. It’s a process where you’ll be removing weeds from the jig more casts than not but when you get a strike you’ll remember how hard they thump the jig.
You’ll also find spots that hold some real nice bass both large and smallmouth.
If your lake has “humps” or “underwater islands”, the walleye will relate to the deeper edges during the day and will come higher to feed in the weeds during low light. I have found a jig/ minnow or a jig and crawler the easiest way to get them.
An underwater camera is a huge help to confirm the locations of walleyes.


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Most inland SE Michigan lakes are stocked walleye that love weeds. After sundown throw a crankbait above and along the outside of weed edges or against a rocky shore that has a lip where they can trap prey. During the day it seems you need to trigger them to ambush live bait from a weed edge. Sometimes they will ambush from a weed clump the size of a tabletop. Sunny and little wave action will be tough and you can catch some soaking a leech in weed openings. To catch the most during the day you need some cloud cover, at least a 1' chop on the water, and you need to cover a lot of weed edges and what I do is long troll a floating crawler harness in an S pattern that will move the harness from dead still up to 2 mph using a slip bottom bouncer and about a 42" snell. I use a pencil weight instead of a bouncer to reduce catching weeds. If you use a floating harness like a Northland Butterfly Float'n Harness it will reduce catching weeds compared to a Colorado blade and it allows you to vary the speed at lot easier. You need an S pattern to reduce spooking them and 2 mph will attract them but many will hit when the rig slows down and rises. In Oakland County you will also get a mixed bag hitting this rig: bluegill, northern, LM bass, and then OMG a walleye.
 
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