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I run a private golf course in Mt. Clemens for which we have 3 ponds and right across the street from us is the Clinton River. For the past 3-4 years we've really had a problem with muskrats burrowing into the pond edges. From here...those burrows end up collapsing when a mower goes across them.

We've set up traps but have had very limited success with them. I may be able to hunt and fish...but I am no trapper. Our best success is catching them moving at first light with a .22.

I've gained a lot more respect for these animals; they're not dumb. Once the sense workers on the golf course...they're not to be seen the rest of the day. On a occasion we've nailed a few young one's sunnin' themselves.

Now is there a particular food source that we can place on or near the trap? They have so many active burrows that's it's difficult to place the trap on the most active/correct tunnel.

Any help or insight would be greatly appreciated... I'm starting to feel like Bill Murray in Caddy Shack.
 

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I have a pond on my property and a nearby stream to supply my pond every fall with a fresh batch of muskrats, are you using conibear traps? They are quite effective in small ponds.
 

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Easy with the .22 unless you have a permit from the DNR to do so. Its unlawful to shoot them unless under said permit. Now on to trapping them. Carrots and a good lure work great, unless they have good food source already, like cattails. If you are trying to use just one trap,, then it is probably an excercise in futility. In a place like that I would place enough steel in those runs to sink the place, see which ones are produceing the best and concentrate there. You might get some offers from guys on here who live in that area with the right knowledge and tools to help you out. Connibears in the runs and holes would be the best bet. Good luck, as you will never get them all. Since you have created great habitat for them with the ponds, then this is something that should be expected. Dont blame the muskrats for wanting to live in a habitat they like. People always seem to want to reign supreme over their domain, especially when animals invade "their" property. Same thing can be said for lake owners with geese. People move to the lake and are now mad at these native animals for using habitat that they like. I dont think you want to see the animals eradicated, just controlled to a level of tolerance. Even if you were to catch all that are there right now, more will be there by next summer. Its that good habitat thing. The only way to get rid of the Muskrats is to fill in the ponds, and we both know that is not going to happen.
 
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