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Here's what I tell people in your shoes. Start with your brake turned all the way up. You aren't going to get distance but don't let that concern you just yet. As you get familiar, slowly back it off. Eventually you'll find your rhythm, then you can swing for the fences. I think where most people get frustrated is that they try to get those bomb casts which really don't work until you've trained your thumb to some degree. Brakes are your friend no matter your skill level. I forced myself to learn about 20 years ago, took only a baitcaster on the water and I got the hang of it in about a week.

Had I had that info a decade ago, I probably would give them a go again. I have swapped to only spinning gear and can cast accurately and without any tangles or issues. Now actually catching fish is a different story….


- VHR
 

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It's a sweet rod for sure, I'm actually about to take it out on the Clinton with my 2500C and get the reel dialed in for river fishing plugs. One thing I love about Japanese trout rods are the wooden reel seats, and this one even has a wooden trigger so it doesn't freeze your fingers in the cold, very well thought out rod. The American brands really can learn a lot from the Japanese in this regard, they can't seem to get past the cheaper graphite reel seats no matter if it's a Loomis, Edge, TFO, or St. Croix. The blank itself is a progressive taper instead of the more common parabolic taper of steelhead rods found here, so more like a bass rod. This is a common action for a plugging rod whereas a spoon/spinner rod will be on the parabolic end.

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I love the look of the wooden reel seat. Japanese rods seem to be as much a work of art as a functional tool. My walleye jigging rod is a fast action and my trout rod is a moderate action and I can tell the difference. The moderate action has the right amount of give and just feels right.


- VHR
 
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