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Hello All, I am new to hunting and have really enjoyed the 3 deer seasons I've hunted. The first 2 years were rifle only, due to my budget only allowing me to purchase a few things at a time. This year I am able to hunt bow season also. I hunt state land and try to scout potential areas as much as possible. In all my scouting I have come up on one feeder and one other blind. Each time I turned around and tried to walk out the same route I came in and then looked for a different area.
In the name of courtesy and safety, how far away from another blind is far enough? For my own safety I want to be well out of range, even over a ridge from another hunter, especially during gun season.

On a side note and novice opinion, I feel that having to remove a popup blind daily is ridiculous. How is a popup blind any different than a semi-permanent structure. Trying to walk into an area in the dark, even after it's been well scouted, setting up a blind and brushing it in can be noisy. I feel that a blind is a blind and the materials it's made of is irrelevant. I try to brush in well enough that the blind is mostly concealed. I could probably hunt the spot with just the brush and without the blind, but I like the comfort of being out of the wind and rain making a longer sit possible. I try to sit from dark to dark.
 

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Hello All, I am new to hunting and have really enjoyed the 3 deer seasons I've hunted. The first 2 years were rifle only, due to my budget only allowing me to purchase a few things at a time. This year I am able to hunt bow season also. I hunt state land and try to scout potential areas as much as possible. In all my scouting I have come up on one feeder and one other blind. Each time I turned around and tried to walk out the same route I came in and then looked for a different area.
In the name of courtesy and safety, how far away from another blind is far enough? For my own safety I want to be well out of range, even over a ridge from another hunter, especially during gun season.

On a side note and novice opinion, I feel that having to remove a popup blind daily is ridiculous. How is a popup blind any different than a semi-permanent structure. Trying to walk into an area in the dark, even after it's been well scouted, setting up a blind and brushing it in can be noisy. I feel that a blind is a blind and the materials it's made of is irrelevant. I try to brush in well enough that the blind is mostly concealed. I could probably hunt the spot with just the brush and without the blind, but I like the comfort of being out of the wind and rain making a longer sit possible. I try to sit from dark to dark.
How far away to go? Not sure. I would go at least a couple of hundred yards if not farther depending on what season is taking place.

I don't understand the pop up rule. Maybe someone else can explain it.

Glad you are enjoying your hunting.

Good Luck!
 

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There's no way in hell I would leave a pop up blind out on public land. To many sticky fingers now days. I had some ass hat climb up the tree next to my hang on during bow season. Luckily I wasn't there that day. But common sense you don't hunt right next to someones stand. If you don't lock stuff up or take it out the same night you leave it'll disappear.
 

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How far away to go? Not sure. I would go at least a couple of hundred yards if not farther depending on what season is taking place.

I don't understand the pop up rule. Maybe someone else can explain it.

Glad you are enjoying your hunting.

Good Luck!
As far as pop-up blinds on state land, if and only if the blind has the hunter's name and address in a visible location, it then becomes a permanent blind which can be left set up during the hunting season. If the blind does not have the hunter's name on it, it must be removed each day after the hunt. Pretty nonsensical rule but I got this answer from a CO.
 

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There's no way in hell I would leave a pop up blind out on public land. To many sticky fingers now days. I had some ass hat climb up the tree next to my hang on during bow season. Luckily I wasn't there that day. But common sense you don't hunt right next to someones stand. If you don't lock stuff up or take it out the same night you leave it'll disappear.

Not always. It depends on where you hunt. I regularly leave my pop-up blinds set up on public land in the NELP. Never had one stolen. But then, I have never seen another hunter in the area that I hunt.
 

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There's no way in hell I would leave a pop up blind out on public land. To many sticky fingers now days. I had some ass hat climb up the tree next to my hang on during bow season. Luckily I wasn't there that day. But common sense you don't hunt right next to someones stand. If you don't lock stuff up or take it out the same night you leave it'll disappear.
I do not think that placing a tree stand on public property entitles you to exclusive use of that property for the entire hunting season. That is why it is called "public land". If that was the case then for a small investment in tree stands, one hunter could claim quite a lot of state land.
 

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You have to be a real ass hat to set up in or near another guys spot period. But with lazy ass people of today it's very common
I agree totally. A couple years ago I walked back to a stand I had setup and guy is sitting in it. Proceeds to tell me it's in the rules and I agree with him. Ask him how good of a hunter he is sitting in someone else's stand and tells me to f off. Guess he didn't like that. People always thinking greener on the other side and are just plain lazy. When I see a stand I make a note of it and don't go by there till the following season
 

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You have to be a real ass hat to set up in or near another guys spot period. But with lazy ass people of today it's very common
I agree that you should not encroach on others.

But if you go into an area and set-up in the dark, it is impossible to tell if somebody has an empty tree stand nearby. Does that make somebody an a$$hat?

Can a small game hunter grouse hunt or rabbit hunt or squirrel hunt on public property or does a treestand negate the property for those purposes?
 

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I agree that you should not encroach on others.

But if you go into an area and set-up in the dark, it is impossible to tell if somebody has an empty tree stand nearby. Does that make somebody an a$$hat?

Can a small game hunter grouse hunt or rabbit hunt or squirrel hunt on public property or does a treestand negate the property for those purposes?
I'm saying if you do such intentionally then yes you would be an ass hat. If your small game hunting out of respect just transit behind the stand. I know guys that have bird hunters on cam shooting over there feeders....you tell me....
 

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I agree totally. A couple years ago I walked back to a stand I had setup and guy is sitting in it. Proceeds to tell me it's in the rules and I agree with him. Ask him how good of a hunter he is sitting in someone else's stand and tells me to f off. Guess he didn't like that. People always thinking greener on the other side and are just plain lazy. When I see a stand I make a note of it and don't go by there till the following season
100 percent dirtbag if he stayed in the pop up after you let him know it was your blind. Yes he has the right by law but ethically not. Of course you run into clueless people often in your hunting career.
 

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On state land there is no "my spot" PERIOD. You cannot lay claim to an area when you are not there. I use a climber so it will never be stolen BUT I did carve my name in my favorite tree so that spot is mine.....
I use a climber as well so someone could very well set up were I hunt. At that point I would probably scout another spot. Im just saying out of respect I would never purposely set up were someone is hunting...just the way I was brought up. Also there are a lot of people that don't have a clue so I'm assuming if they see a stand....there must be deer....why scout
 

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I agree totally. A couple years ago I walked back to a stand I had setup and guy is sitting in it. Proceeds to tell me it's in the rules and I agree with him. Ask him how good of a hunter he is sitting in someone else's stand and tells me to f off. Guess he didn't like that. People always thinking greener on the other side and are just plain lazy. When I see a stand I make a note of it and don't go by there till the following season
That's when you take the bottom of your climbing sticks off and leave his ass up there
 

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Hello All, I am new to hunting and have really enjoyed the 3 deer seasons I've hunted. The first 2 years were rifle only, due to my budget only allowing me to purchase a few things at a time. This year I am able to hunt bow season also. I hunt state land and try to scout potential areas as much as possible. In all my scouting I have come up on one feeder and one other blind. Each time I turned around and tried to walk out the same route I came in and then looked for a different area.
In the name of courtesy and safety, how far away from another blind is far enough? For my own safety I want to be well out of range, even over a ridge from another hunter, especially during gun season.

On a side note and novice opinion, I feel that having to remove a popup blind daily is ridiculous. How is a popup blind any different than a semi-permanent structure. Trying to walk into an area in the dark, even after it's been well scouted, setting up a blind and brushing it in can be noisy. I feel that a blind is a blind and the materials it's made of is irrelevant. I try to brush in well enough that the blind is mostly concealed. I could probably hunt the spot with just the brush and without the blind, but I like the comfort of being out of the wind and rain making a longer sit possible. I try to sit from dark to dark.
Welcome to Michigan- Sportsman DuperDave.

You seem to be tolerating traffic in the woods well.
For courtesy, being far enough away would be to not interfere with a specific stands range of potential targets when possible. A deer run a quarter mile away may see use by a deer that goes near that stand but is different than risking or possibly interfering with the stand site as personally/intentionally.
That works both ways as when you are downwind of another hunter it may have a negative effect on your hunting.
Those sites you backtracked out of...if you can go either side of them to enter to go past to other areas,then skirting them out of their hunting/shot range, with a hundred yard minimum during bow season.. should be fine.
Other hunters passing through your set up don't mean a blown hunt..especially in areas with regular human traffic.
If you want physical structure as defense during firearm season use it!
Even a big tree could screen a direction.
Being flexible and having alternatives scouted can help.
Your being willing to hunt less favorable weather can help find more elbow room sometimes.
Folks can get territorial despite the rules regarding stands.
Hunted enough or even wrong once a stand can be very unproductive.
Yet there are some who feel they should belong to them as well as their own spot.
That's fine,I can grumble and still be mobile and hunt fresh sits at new sites.
Sometimes the result trumps having had a hunted area elsewhere due to traffic or squatters, not produce...
 

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You have to be a real ass hat to set up in or near another guys spot period. But with lazy ass people of today it's very common
Depends on where you hunt. If you are somewhere with low people to land ratios and where abandoned stands don't sprout up every 50 yards - I'm inclined to move on.

In the SGA I hunt if you refused to set up within 100 yards of an existing stand - you couldn't hunt anywhere in the SGA.

The 80 acres I've been hunting for the last 8-10 years only sees about 3-4 people hunt it during a regular firearm season (plus a few groups running deer drives in the front field)... but there are easily over a dozen blinds/stands around the property - the majority of which have never been used in the 10 years I've been hunting there.
 

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I do not think that placing a tree stand on public property entitles you to exclusive use of that property for the entire hunting season. That is why it is called "public land". If that was the case then for a small investment in tree stands, one hunter could claim quite a lot of state land.
I agree. I have no qualms about setting up near someone's stand. Like you said it is state land and simply placing a stand doesn't give one sole rights to an area. If I didn't do this I would never get to hunt on the land around my house as everyone has laid claim to an area by putting up stands. This year i sat by a couple stands and never saw anyone try to use them.
 

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When heading into the woods in the dark and you have flash lights shining at you makes a different story. MOVE ON. All too often I have seen tree stands with never a person in them and I am supposed to go hunt somewhere else? Don't see it that way. I have hunted the same state land for 18yrs and have no need to scout for trails or sign. Pretty much stays the same. No need to put up trail markers either, know where I'm going. Apparently I am to scout for areas with no tree stands.
 
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