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Discussion Starter #1
Found this tucked deep in the corner of the barn last weekend. It was the “backup” to my heavier duty spear. Never threw at a fish back then but did check its flight with a few practice throws. As you may imagine it does plane when thrown at an angle.

Not a fan of the thin barbs and small diameter steel shaft.

So, how to rework the lead to provide for better hydrodynamics? The angled leading edge in the tines is lead. Cut and shape to get a pipe around and pour the remainder in?

Is it possible to cut the tines deeper? To put a wood handle on the shaft?
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Discussion Starter #3
I wouldn't do anything to it. It looks vintage to me.
Do you think that was a manufactured weighting or someone’s personal shop add-on?

Many of you have seen far more spears from back in the day—I’m thinking this was a 60s-70s vintage based on when I got it (c. 1981) from a neighbor who was a carpenter but probably well connected to machinists. I added the black paint and hanger screw (since removed).

I wish I still had the nice spear I had borrowed from a different elderly neighbor, a short handled forged 7-tine that weighed about 10 pounds. Flew true! Returned it after the season and then college kept me off the ice for too long...
He also had some beautiful perch spears from his days on northern Lake Huron. Really neat stories from Mr. Elliott about those adventures.
 
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