Michigan Sportsman Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,367 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So these are some VERY easy flies to tie...So I've been able to tie up a bunch of them...

But I don't think I have ever caught a fish on one...but I will keep trying them...Anybody else have the opportunity to catch fish on Sparrows? What kind of bug are they intended to imitate?



Guess I can add the recipe as well for those wh do not know it.

Hook: TMC3761 (This is a size 12)
Tail: Feather Fibers from Pheasant Rump Patch (This one happens to be Natural Color)
Body: Dubbing or Peacock Hurl (this is peacock dubbing)
Head/legs(long feathers): Top part of a feather from a pheasant rump. The same feather you stripped for the tail.
Gills or whatever they are: the little filo plume feather that pulls out with the main feather. Very very very delicate so they might break on you. Also from the Pheaston Rump.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,347 Posts
Yes, I have caught AuSable rainbow's on them. I don't think they are meant as an exact immitation of anything in particular, but they seem to resemble nymphs in general.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,367 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply...I'll keep faith in them...

I was thinking that maybe they looked like a wiggler or something to that efect when they get wet...they don't look all fluffy when they get wet...haha...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,347 Posts
I was thinking that the soft hackle would move around and look like legs kicking and trying to hold onto something. Kinda like when a nymph gets swept up in the current and is freaking out.

I cast them straight across and let them swing down without stripping at all. Come to think of it, I caught my biggest Brown on a simillar fly fished that way. I used black ultra-chenille instead of peacock herl, and the hackle was a little shorter and a bit stiffer, but it was more or less the same style of fly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
634 Posts
I have them but haven't caught anything on them yet. To me, my sparrows most closely resembel a hex nymph, primarily because they are a bit large. I haven't used them too much because I typically fish eggs and stones for steelhead, and bead-headed nymphs (hare's ears, caddis, etc) for trout. I plan on broadening my horizons on the new year, maybe I will try them more.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,775 Posts
Yes, they do resemble wigglers and I believe that's what they were meant to do but Ypsi is correct also, if it moves right in the proper colors it can look like a stone or mayfly in molt.

I've never landed a steelie on them but if you read [email protected]'s reports he seems to do quite well on them. I've done well on wigglers in the winter time (especially early in November). There are some reasons for this.

Remember, hex nymphs (wigglers) molt approx. 30 times over two years before surfacing and hatching. The hex are burrowers who come out of the soil approx. every 30 to 45 days to molt. With the amount of hex in the soils molting there are quite a bit floating around daily. Obviously this will become a staple of trout and steelhead through out the year. During the winter months nothing really hatches except for a few early stones, yellow stones, small BWO's and maybe some midges. Even for these to hatch you need a slight warm up or sun. This means the rivers are full of nymphs waiting to hatch during the winter after the summer duns lay their eggs.

I think Steve does well on them because he fishes the PM. It doesn't mean you won't do well on other rivers (I've taken quite a few browns on the Big Man with them) but the PM has lots of sand and soils that hold hex. Winter steelhead seek slack water with little current to hold over the winter to ease the amount of energy they burn up. They won't hold much over gravel since the rocks will create current making the fish expend too much energy. Winter steelhead will look for deep, sandy or soiled holes. This allows them to get below the current and the soils don't create that much current on the bottom. I'm sure these fish feed on hex that molt since they are sharing the same waters.

Hatches II and Selective Trout are excellent books if you want to learn more about nymphs such as burrowers, clingers and swimmers.

BTW, nice fly. I just tied a half dozen in brown, black and olive last week for my boxes. Now to find time to use them. When wet the soft hackle will go back on the fly but still 'swim' in the current as do the gills on a wiggler. Now go fish them. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,367 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Riverman...I have seen that sparrow in the library...He goes through the trouble of tying on eyes and stuff...haha...I suppose the extra weight is a good thing sometimes...

He also puts a shell casing along the back...

But none the less...I have tied up mostly black ones myself...the one in the picture I was just playing around last night and that was what materials I had handy without digging out the others...

Thanks for the replies so far guys...
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top