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Was watching a video on U tube the other day and saw this Swedish girl calling the dairy cows in for the evening milking, and it triggered some memories for me from back when I was a kid working on small dairy farms and being around several relatives who had small dairy operations.
One of the most enjoyable jobs I had was walking out to the lane in the evening and hollering for the cows to come in, and it was always a good feeling to see the herd trooping in together. Hadn’t thought of that in many years.
Any of you folks remember doing that?
 

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Was watching a video on U tube the other day and saw this Swedish girl calling the dairy cows in for the evening milking, and it triggered some memories for me from back when I was a kid working on small dairy farms and being around several relatives who had small dairy operations.
One of the most enjoyable jobs I had was walking out to the lane in the evening and hollering for the cows to come in, and it was always a good feeling to see the herd trooping in together. Hadn’t thought of that in many years.
Any of you folks remember doing that?
No.

But I can imagine it.
 

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Was watching a video on U tube the other day and saw this Swedish girl calling the dairy cows in for the evening milking, and it triggered some memories for me from back when I was a kid working on small dairy farms and being around several relatives who had small dairy operations.
One of the most enjoyable jobs I had was walking out to the lane in the evening and hollering for the cows to come in, and it was always a good feeling to see the herd trooping in together. Hadn’t thought of that in many years.
Any of you folks remember doing that?

My uncle had me go call in the milk cows a couple times. It only took that long to realize they were going to come in then anyway. They kind of had their own, predetermined, order coming though the narrow lane into the milk house.

From then on it was funny, I could call and nothing, then one heads that way and they just lined up.
 

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No. But I did spend much of my spare time working on a dairy farm from 2004 until about 2017.

I used to show my students a cow magnet that is used to prevent "hardware disease" in cattle.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hardware_disease

Before I explained what it was really used for, I would explain that it was swallowed by cows and the farmer had a large electromagnet in the barn. At milking time, he could throw a switch and the cattle would line up and walk to the barn.
 

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Many years ago my best friend dated this girl that still lived with her parents. She lived on a farm that had a some cows. Maybe 80-100. Her parents were frequently not there. One time I found out that they yelled "boss" in a long drawn out way to have all the cows come in. So, after I figured that out, and normally after a few beers, I'd always go out and yell "Boss" just to see all the cows come in. Used to drive her crazy.
 

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Yelled "Cum Boss". Most of the time the cows knew when it was time to come to the parlor. Had the old Nurse Boss cow, #56, that the rest of the herd followed. 56, or we called her grandma, would head in and all the rest would follow. Grandma was ALWAYS the last one to come in. Never had to check for stragglers. Ol 56 didn't give much milk anymore, but she was worth her weight in gold for herd management. Milked 80-90 cows in a double six herringbone parlor. Dipped in the bulk tank for some good fat milk for home made ice cream. Funny how all those cows were pets in their own way. Could jump on #27 and ride her around like a pony. Stay away from 35.. She had a BAD attitude and would come looking for a fight. Good memories.
 

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Was watching a video on U tube the other day and saw this Swedish girl calling the dairy cows in for the evening milking, and it triggered some memories for me from back when I was a kid working on small dairy farms and being around several relatives who had small dairy operations.
One of the most enjoyable jobs I had was walking out to the lane in the evening and hollering for the cows to come in, and it was always a good feeling to see the herd trooping in together. Hadn’t thought of that in many years.
Any of you folks remember doing that?
Helped out on several neighbors dairy farms growing up never really had to call the cows in for milking, they knew when it was time (chow time) and pretty much lined up and were waiting for the door to open. If you were a little late they would be calling you. LOL.
 

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No calling cows in. But I did bail hay one year. Then helped a buddy a few yrs ago.
Itll be another 40 yrs before I do that again

Sent from my SM-A102U using Michigan Sportsman mobile app
That reminds me of all the summers spent as a kid bailing hay for a free two day trip to Cedar Point each year. I thought it was a heck of a deal back then. LOL.
 

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We would always yell come bossy, come bossy. Must be cattle from different areas listened differently. Kind of like perch in one lake bite a different bait than they do in a different one.:)
 
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I remember I was in college in Port Huron, a friend of mine was a dairy farmer in Peck and needed some help for a week, stupid me. No one told me you had to milk them twice a day and all the other stuff that went along with it. Drank "REAL" whole milk for the first time, think my arteries are just now started to soften up. One good thing, this guy had a cousin and she was pretty good looking, so not a bad week, at least had a nice view.
 

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Wow, you guys could call cows. Every morning Grandma turned them loose to forage in the mountains. Every evening we had to go find them and bring them home. Only ever found one dead, eating grapes and pulled a dead branch down and broke her neck. Then had one fall into a mining crack. Fun times.......not
 

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I worked on my Uncle & Aunt's farm from every summer from ages 7 - 16. From bringing cows in, to bailing hay, to doing a grist, to spreading s***. My uncle had me drive a tractor behind him (I was 8) to a field I'd never been to. He showed me how to fix rake tines and how to rake a row for the bailer. He showed me the "kill switch" on the tractor and not to be afraid to see a bear. THen he let me learn how to rake the entire field by myself. I will never forget the trust he put in me.
 

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I worked on my Uncle & Aunt's farm from every summer from ages 7 - 16. From bringing cows in, to bailing hay, to doing a grist, to spreading s***. My uncle had me drive a tractor behind him (I was 8) to a field I'd never been to. He showed me how to fix rake tines and how to rake a row for the bailer. He showed me the "kill switch" on the tractor and not to be afraid to see a bear. THen he let me learn how to rake the entire field by myself. I will never forget the trust he put in me.
I was driving the tractor from sun up till sun down at 10 years old. It was pulling the tobacco cropping trailer with eight people on it too. That's how I learned to drive and of course it was a manual transmission too!
 

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Yep, raised on a small dairy farm. As one mentioned---come boss, come boss, come boss was the call. The bull was the cum boss.
It's "baling" hay or straw, not bailing. Like baling wire if you're old enough to remember that.
Bailing water out of a boat is one example of bail.

L & O
 
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Years a go when I was stationed at Fort Rucker Alabama, my unit had funeral detail responsibility for retired vets for a quarter of the year. We had a detail in the boonies of mississippi somewhere. The cemetery was next to a pasture. I was on the rifle squad and we had to march in right up to a fence to position ourselves so the rifles were firing over the casket, tallest at the fence and shortest being closest to the crowd so we would appear more uniform in height. I was 2nd tallest, with a new private, being a full head taller than me, positioned right in the fence. It was hot as hell in our greens. Finally the ceremony was almost over and we fired. Standing at present arms with rifles, the private, House, kept bumping shoulders with me. I sternly whispered, "knock it off house". I keep getting bumped. " House, quit Fing around!". He whispered back, "I can't help it. This cow won't leave me alone." I look out of the corner of my eye and there is a cow at the fence, reaching over and trying to midge or get at House's garrison cap and house was hitting me when he leaned away, out of reach. Come to find out The farmers around there call the cows in to feed with a bugle or horn. After we fired and the bugler started taps, the cows started coming to the fence line.
 
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