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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Jan. 11 the DNR will be discussing the use of snares for taking fox and coyote during the winter months. I am all for the use of snares. Removing your favorite hunting dog from a snare is not a problem.
 

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I would have to agree with you Joe.
Your average pet or hunting dog is very comfortable with wearing a collar and being on a leash so they would most likely just sit in place until someone would let them go.
Makes sense.

 

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Snares are the way to go for controlling the coyote population during the winter month, there safe and very effective, one thing people don't understand about them is they can be set as a restraining device, NOT a killing device.
 

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Can deer and other non-nuisance animals get caught in the snares?

Deerless


[This message has been edited by deerless (edited 01-05-2001).]
 
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Snares are a very inexpensive and effective way to catch furbearers. Yes, they can also capture deer, but usually only when used incorrectly or intentionally (illegally) for that purpose. Also, "deer stops" which cause the snare to not close tighter than about 3" inches or so can be used to prevent a deer's leg from getting caught in the snare. This is actually the law in several states, such as South Dakota.

By placing snares along travel routes (least resistance routes for coyotes and such), and at a height appropriate for the desired game, incidental catches are rare.

Before moving to this state, I used snares extensively. I only once got a deer caught up in the piano wire. She was released unharmed and lived through the winter.

As for hunting dogs and snares, I've never heard of or seen a firsthand account of it happening. And I hunt with dogs alot. You've got more to worry about with old barbed wire fences than with snares. Don't let your dog run amok unattended, and you won't have any issues. It's that simple.

I hope the MDNR approves the use of this tool.
 

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I agree with alpha to. As long as the don't or can't trap deer. But what would they do with the coyote or fox once they caught them. Relocate them or put them down?
 

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This would be a tool for fur harvest. I too hope they legalize snares. I'd rather not have my dogs getting caught in a #3 coil spring. Which I think, are legal on dry land up north. For you trappers up there, If my dog does get caught in a trap, It will be right where I found it. Accidents happen. And if its a snare I might even reset it. :)



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Never Confuse having a career with having a life!
 

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snare.probally the most effective coyote control trap known to man. they work great there cheap they will not kill a hunting dog. deer stops and large game break away locks make them deer proof. they don't get stolen as much as normal traps. (snare 50 cents normal trap $10) carl
 

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Where can a person get information on the proper way to make and set up snares?
 
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For those who are interested in learning more about the application of snares, visit http://www.snareshop.com .

I have done business with these folks. Their products, service, and prices are second to none. I reccomend them wholeheartedly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Originally posted by Eastern Yooper:

..... I hope the DNR doesn't discuss the idea very long.....

What is your reasoning behind your remark? Are you a trapper? Or are you one of those people(P.E.T.A. People Engaged in Terroristic Activity) who likes to impose their uneducated opion.

 

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Snares are the way to go for coyote and fox!
I would feel a lot better setting a snare than a leg hold, which could harm someones household pet. I HOPE THE MDNR THINK THIS ONE OUT AND DO THE RIGHT THING.
 

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I have not heard what happened at the NRC Meeting yet but if it wasn't approved I believe you will see it approved for coyote and fox.
 

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I think it's about time that snares become a legal tool for the furharvesters in this state. Used properly they can be very species selective. And with coyote numbers up we need every tool available to harvest these animals. Here in the NW lower, when the snow piles up, it can make using foot-hold traps for coyotes and fox almost impossible to keep operating! Allowing snares that still function in deep snow would keep trappers out there harvesting more coyotes!
 

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I know some of us that trap are interested in the snare and other trapping, so I will post what info I have right now. Keep in mind this is just what is being looked at, it is NOT LAW YET!

For the 2001-2002 trapping season.

Require catching devices designed to hold an animal alive to be tended once per day.

On public lands, all conibear traps great than 6 inches in diameter must be placed 4 feet or more above ground or in a box inaccessible to dogs.

Encourge trappers to purchase and utilize newly developed raccoon-specific traps (EGG, Duffer, etc.) and allow trappers to utilize conibear traps placed 4 feet or more above ground in these areas.

Allow snares for fox and coyote from Jan 1 through March 1.

Allow beaver trapping through April 30 on designated trout streams in the U.P.

Open beaver in the lower on all waters begining Nov 1.

REMEMBER, THIS IS NOT LAW, ONLY BEING CONSIDERED!!!



[This message has been edited by boehr (edited 01-19-2001).]
 

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I heard from our MDNR furbearer specialist in wildlife division. He said the NRC is talking about legalizing snares starting in 2002 for coyotes and fox from Jan 1 through the end of Feb, but only on private ground.

 

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Snares may be given
the OK for use in
capturing coyotes,
fox

Wednesday, January 19, 2000

By Bob Gwizdz
Booth News Service


LANSING - Trappers will be allowed to use snares to
capture coyotes and fox if the Natural Resources
Commission agrees with a Department of Natural
Resources recommendation.

The regulations change would allow trappers to use snares
on dry land for the first time. Currently, only beaver
trappers can use snares and they must set them under
the ice.

The proposal comes at a time of exploding coyote
populations and technological advances making non-lethal
snares possible. The change could allow trappers to retire
some of their larger leg-hold and body-gripping traps in
favor of snares.

The dry-land snaring season would be Jan. 1 to March 1.

The proposal has been well received by trappers for several
reasons. Snares are less expensive than conventional
traps, and can be fashioned in a manner that will make
them less likely to capture non-target animals, according
to DNR furbearer specialist Tim Reis.

Snares would only be legal on private land, to avoid
possible conflicts with other users of public land, Reis
said.

Snares have long been illegal because, historically, they
were viewed as killing traps and therefore unacceptable
because of the possibility of cats or dogs being caught in
them. Snares were often set in such a manner that they
jerked an animal off the ground when tripped.

"That's the reason, I think, that we never allowed them,"
Reis said. "I'm sure hunters were concerned what these
things would do to their hunting dogs."

New technology now allows snares to be set that limit the
size and constriction of the loop. Today's snares - made of
cable instead of wire, so they do less damage to an
animal - operate much like a choke collar, Reis said.

"If an animal backs off, it takes off some of the tension,"
he said.

In addition, stops that would prevent the loop from
constricting to less than 21/2 inches in diameter would
allow many non-target animals - deer for instance - to step
right out of the snare. Other restrictions - such as the
maximum size of the loop and maximum height it can be
set - would help protect other non-target animals, Reis
said.

Several states have legalized the use of snares in recent
years without significant problems, Reis said.

In addition to allowing snares, the DNR has asked the
NRC to require that all trappers who use non-lethal sets be
required to check their traps every 24 hours. Michigan is
one of only a few states that allows trapping without a
mandatory daily trap check.
 
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