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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone have any "trade" secrets they use. Either with or with out a vise/shooting bench, or bore sighting...just curious to see if there is a sure fire way that you may use, or that works for you
 

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Well first thing get it bagged and do a bore sight. Look down the bore and center it on something then adjust the scope to the same spot. Double check.

Then move to 20 yrds or so and fire a shot. Don't worry about counting clicks, just keep track of turns. Maybe start with 2 turns. Fire again and repeat until zero'd

Next move to 50 yrds and fire a round. Now count clicks, use a standard target with 1" grids to make life simple. 2 moa(8 clicks) for each inch if you have a 1/4 click scope. Some are 1/8. Again repeat until zero'd.

Move to 100 yrds. Same program except now fire a group of three and pick the center pt to count your clicks from. This distance is easiest 1 click for each 1/4" or 1 moa for each inch. Make your adjustment and shoot another 3 shot to check.

The worst part is the 20 yrd. If you can get threw that in less than 5 your doing OK. You shouldn't use more than 20 shells in the process.

Alternative would be go right from 20 to the 100 but you'll need a large piece of cardboard and a tape measure.

Its important to bag the rifle so every shot counts and there's no doubt if you threw the shot. You should only need one or two shots at the 50 and 6 at the hundred.

If you want a 200 yrd zero you'll need another 6 shots at the 200 range. Or set it 2" high at 100 and call it good.
 

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Forgot an important part.
Each time you adjust the Scopes tap the scope rings several times with a chunk of wood to help the scope adjust. Seriously.

I sighted one in today. Rough sight in took 11 rounds, six more fine tuned it.
 

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check balistic charts for a close sight in. Basicaly see where there the bullet first crosses the line of sight with the scope. If i remember right a 30.06 crosses the line of sight @ 25yrds and then drops back to the line of sight @100yrds. So i would say start you first sight in @ 25yrds. Every gun will be differant along with scope hight but it should give you a good guess.

I would also recomend (unless sighting for a special or percise distance) check out the calibers maximum point blank range.
 

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Go to 100 yard range, rest gun on something solid, remove bolt, look down barrel and center target in barrel, adjust scope to target without moving gun, fire a shot or two to fine tune.
 

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One or Two shot Zero

Hey Steve, you'll need:
1. A large piece of cardboard, old plywood or paneling like 30" x 30" with a 3/4"-1" target dot in the center.
2. A good sturdy bench, seat, sand bags.
Or if you shoot a lot or have a few buddy's shooting, chip in and get a bench rest.
There are decent bench rests, for example a Lead Sled available for around $100.
3. A helper.

A lot of things like ammo, action/barrel condition, scope/mount quality can affect the procedure, but overall the technique works plenty satisfactory and saves $$.

First, Bore sight to be on paper at your desired distance...
This works with the Bolt actions as mentioned but a laser is better for Levers, Pumps and Semi's.

Next, Sand bag the gun well, side to side and front to back.
(Or secure in the bench rest)
Take your best aimed shot with the cross hairs on the target dot.
If you think you flinched or lost the target on firing do it again.

The final part is critical:

Reset as if to shoot again, keep the gun firmly in position with the cross hairs still on the target dot.
DO NOT move the gun.
Have your helper adjust the cross hairs as you coach him/her until they line up dead on your bullet hole...it can be enlarged a tiny bit with a marker if it's hard to see...

Take a second shot with the cross hairs again on the target dot to confirm the Zero or hold steady on the dot while your buddy fine tunes those last couple clicks to the bullet hole...

OR

Next time you're heading up, let me know and c'mon over with the gun(s).
I have a bench rest and a public range a couple miles from the house.
I don't have a bore sight but plenty of 48" white roll paper, LOL.
 

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OR, if it's raining, wind blowing hard or if you just don't feel like a long drive to an outdoor range, go to your friendly neighborhood indoor range (provided, of course, they allow your caliber) and do most of the above at 25 yards. Have the rifle secured as best you can so errant shots are the "arrow" not the "Indian." If your firearm has a muzzle velocity of 2700 to 3200 fps or so you will also be sighted in at close to 200 yards. Be as careful as possible when pulling the trigger because, remember, any grouping at 25 yards is multiplied by 4 at 100 yards! If you know pretty closely what your muzzle velocity is you can search the internet for ballistics charts to track the flight of the bullet, based on your 25 yard zero, out to nearly any practical distance. Since I chrono all my loads, I check my ballistics charts before sighting in. For example, my 10mm is sighted at 13 yards, 44 mag at 18 yards, 308 at 25 yards and so forth. I pick the distance to maximize the point-of-aim distance where the bullet neither rises or falls more than 3 inches. A whole lot of folks just automatically sight-in at 100 yards but, for their particular caliber, there may be much better choices.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I can usually do it within 5 or so rounds...with out bore sighting lasers....I use kitty litter bags, for a rest. I bore sight with my eye at 25 yrds, shoot a round or two, move my scope to the shot if i feel i used good shooting tech...then move to 50..shoot a round or two, same if i feel i had good tech...then to a 100.....and im usually dead on...if im way off in any shot, say from the 25 to 50 comparision, and i used proper tech then i trouble shoot my rifle/scope...one time i was way way off and i found a loose mount...the other time..i had a bad scope, and the reticle was actuall broke, and wouldnt adjust...one other thing i doo is take a torpedo level with me and level my target. i use 1/4 inch moa sight targets when possible...as far as ammo to do this i usually use a grain thats in between the lowest, and highest for that round...however in higher or hotter calibers there can be a difference in accuracy when i use a hotter load, usually within a 1/2 moa...sometimes more...but nothing to extreme.

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One or Two shot Zero
. . . Reset as if to shoot again, keep the gun firmly in position with the cross hairs still on the target dot.
DO NOT move the gun.
Have your helper adjust the cross hairs as you coach him/her until they line up dead on your bullet hole...it can be enlarged a tiny bit with a marker if it's hard to see . . .
+1 this is an excellent way to sight in with very few shots and the way I sight in, normally alone though. You must make sure rifle is solid on target, then while looking through scope turn the elevation and/or windage to put crosshairs on bullet hole.

Bore sight or with bolt out look thru barrel most times gets you on paper. If not, move closer and try from 50 yards.
 

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Your best bet is to bore site the weapon then will get you on paper also when a round is fire the bullets trajectory will cross the same plain twice. In a rifle the first time the bullet crosses this plain usually happens around 20 - 25 yard, the bullet will cross the plain again around 100 yards or so. Site your weapon in at the 20-25 yard mark shooting a a small target this will bring you the closest to a correct zero.


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Forgot an important part.
Each time you adjust the Scopes tap the scope rings several times with a chunk of wood to help the scope adjust. Seriously.

I sighted one in today. Rough sight in took 11 rounds, six more fine tuned it.

You must have some pretty cheap scopes, if you have to beat on them :yikes: every time you adjust them.
 

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The Very First Step...START WITH A CLEAN BORE!

And make sure its clean! Sounds simple right? You'd be surprised how many people over look this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
The Very First Step...START WITH A CLEAN BORE!

And make sure its clean! Sounds simple right? You'd be surprised how many people over look this.
Well clean as in powder fouling...i just seen a show a few weeks ago, maybe guns n ammo?...at any rate they had an Army sniper school instructor talking about removing copper/lead from the bore...they did a study on accuracy on metal build up, and if I recall right they only run copper solvent through their weapons approximately every 1000 rounds...dont quote me on this exact number, but it was up there pretty high. Which I was really surprised.....


just went and reviewed the show again, they dont use copper solvent untill 3 to 4 thousand rounds, and thats only if the grouping is starting to open up..the rifle the Sgt had in front of him had 7000 rounds through it, and still was holding..a .6 or better grouping...who would have thunk it?

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
I'll bet the guys who scored highest on the course are the ones who ignored that instructors advice!
no what they found was if you remove the copper it takes 30 or 40 shots to keep a consistent group...its on guns and ammo...show # 4...maybe im not explaining it correctly...look it up....but then again it was the Army...im USMC...so it wouldnt surprise me if they messed it up...lol...no seriously it makes sense

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It’s true, let the gun tell you when to clean the bore. When the rifle starts throwing inconsistent shots that is not due to the shooter then it’s time to clean. There are only two other times you will want to, when the bore gets wet or if the rifle is going to be sitting idle for a few months. However you don’t mess with the copper removers just run some patches of you oil of choice. I do, however, clean the chamber and bolt every few hundred rounds.

Now to the OP’s question. When I swap scopes around or get a new rifle I bore sight on a distant object that can be seen from my dinner table/window about 150 yards away. I center the object as best I can in the bore and adjust the scope to match. When I get to the range I assume whatever position the rifle is going to be fired from the most. That is mostly prone with a bipod and rear bean/sand bag for me. I shoot one shot and because I am using a mildot scope I find the correction needed by measuring with the reticle and dial in that adjustment, the second shot should then be on the mark at that point but I usually fire a third just to verify. This works well for rifles that have been fired and are not subject to having a clean bore. If the rifle is new or freshly cleaned I will need to fire 3 or more (the number of shots depends on the barrel) for the groups to settle down.

Now if you’re not using a mildot or similar reticle that you can measure with, fire your shot, with the rifle stabilized so it can’t move, turn the adjustments till they match the point of impact on the target. This should put shot number two on the money unless the bore is clean or you have cold shooter issues. If either of those occurs, shoot a group of 3-5 before you make an adjustment to the scope, this will allow you and/or the rifle to settle down and show consistency.
 

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You would have a hard time selling that advice to anyone shooting on a benchrest circuit. :lol:

second piece of advice: Don't buy a lead sled and instead save your money and get a good shooters rest and bags, like Sinclairs or better.
Mechanical rests are worthless, unless you can maybe use them to hold your gun while cleaning it.

3rd piece of advice: If you loading your own and don't have any previous data saved, then use the recommended data published by the powder company whose powder you are using. A mid charge load will get you mid term accuracy, or worse, but certainly nothing you can use.
 

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Every darn gun I own (Other than those with polygonal rifling) shoots better after running 50 rounds through it if it was just cleaned. Many of my rimfires start grouping best after 200.........
 

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Every darn gun I own (Other than those with polygonal rifling) shoots better after running 50 rounds through it if it was just cleaned. Many of my rimfires start grouping best after 200.........
Agreed. After zeroing in, I never clean the bore until after the season is over.
 

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You would have a hard time selling that advice to anyone shooting on a benchrest circuit. :lol:
No argument there :D but I am not looking for .000 size groups for score and changing my barrel every 1-2 thousand rounds either.

This has worked well with three 223’s, a 243, 260, five 308’s and a 300wsm. These will hold between .25”-.8” at a 100 and have printed many sub moa groups on steel out to ten times that distance.
 
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