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It's been 10yrs since I last turkey hunted and i could you some help from some of you Ol'Tom killers. When is the best time to scout for Spring turkey's and what do you look for? I'm hunting public land and I know there is a good population of turkey's there because I see them all the time when deer hunting. Any info would be appreciated.
 

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Now is a good time to learn some of the turkeys movements, because they leave prints in the snow. If you can follow up tracks into some hardwoods after an evening snow you can find the roosts they're currently using. If you find their roosts, you can observe from a distance during a sunrise and get to know the local flock. Food sources will change when the snow is gone and so can the turkeys pattern. But by doing it now you can hone your scouting skills get back into watching the birds.

Once the snow is gone I like to know their preferred roost, their dusting area, and their current food sources. With some watching from a distance of the roost I like to learn where the unpressured birds like to go after fly down. That's where I start to hunt, I try and be where the birds want to be after fly down. If I don't have any success late morning I'll move toward the dusting area and see if I can get a late morning bird.

I never call when scouting. I'm not a turkey, I've fooled a few :lol: but I don't want the birds patterning me. I will scout with a hawk and crow call though. If I'm not making contact I'll try and see if I can get a shock gobble to help locate birds.
 

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Now is a good time to learn some of the turkeys movements, because they leave prints in the snow. If you can follow up tracks into some hardwoods after an evening snow you can find the roosts they're currently using. If you find their roosts, you can observe from a distance during a sunrise and get to know the local flock. Food sources will change when the snow is gone and so can the turkeys pattern. But by doing it now you can hone your scouting skills get back into watching the birds.

Once the snow is gone I like to know their preferred roost, their dusting area, and their current food sources. With some watching from a distance of the roost I like to learn where the unpressured birds like to go after fly down. That's where I start to hunt, I try and be where the birds want to be after fly down. If I don't have any success late morning I'll move toward the dusting area and see if I can get a late morning bird.

I never call when scouting. I'm not a turkey, I've fooled a few :lol: but I don't want the birds patterning me. I will scout with a hawk and crow call though. If I'm not making contact I'll try and see if I can get a shock gobble to help locate birds.
Good post......find the large flocks now, then keep an eye on them towards March and April when they start splitting up.
 

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I rarely if ever scout turkeys, I may go listen a day or two if I am home from out of state.. I scout land.. Turkeys movements are predictable until you hunt them.. The land rarely changes..
 

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I agree with Dedgoose. If you got the urge to scout now go ahead but it might not do you much good come spring unless there is a good food source to keep them there.I would look for topography and the habitat around the flock now that would dictate movement come spring.Rivers and fingered drainage's are my go to landmark when trying to figure out what winter flocks will use when dispersing in the spring.
A winter flock will give you a good starting spot come spring.Another bonus of a winter flock is that there are usually large numbers and if you can get close you might hear some bird vocalizations that will help you with your calling. Turkeys will gobble in the winter usually in the morning just not a lot, so if you are on to a group of toms and get to hear gobbling most of us will be very envious. Good Luck.
 

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I'm new to the Turkey hunting thing too, started last year... I took one lesson from deer hunting public land and applied it to turkeys. You need to scout other hunters in your area as well. I started scouting by talking to the DNR officers...then went to the other end of the park... A week before my season, Just as the sun started to eek up I hit the crow call... got a return gooble in the distance, moved about 250 yrds and crow called again, again the turkey gobbled and from the estimated distance and directions was able to get a pretty good idea what area he roosted, later that afternoon I checked the area for the roosting site, was able to find a quiet entry into a field and found a dusting site. Two days before my hunt I crow called from the road just to confirm he was still in the area... and day 3: I had my 1st bird.. and never saw another hunter the entire time. :D
 

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Thanks EZ, Guess we'll find this spring whether it was beginners luck... I guess you could say I've already started scouting, I took my Lab for a walk in the same woods and she took off into some brush and soon heard some frantic clucking and wing flapping.... Dumb dog thought she flushed the mother of all partridge... But I know where I'll be this spring...:lol:
 
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