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Science aims at ash borers
Michigan company makes compound that's proving deadly to tree pest

Emerald BioAgriculture Corp., a Lansing company, is taking aim at a new market and an invasive pest — the emerald ash borer.
One of its products, BotaniGard, contains a fungus that has proven to be extremely effective at killing the beetle, a species from northern Asia that has devastated ash trees in southeastern Michigan and has spread to Ohio, Indiana, Maryland and Virginia.

http://www.detnews.com/2003/business/0312/28/b10-19904.htm
 

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I was absolutely delighted when I read this article in today's newspaper. I, perhaps like many others, had concluded that yet another cataclysmic
event in nature was/is taking its horrific course and we were/are powerless to alter its destiny in any fashion. Not so, now it appears.

How many of you can recall, the gigantic splendor of the now extinct* Dutch Elm Tree? If only we had such a similar antidote then, how our landscape would be so wonderfully different!

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Actually, the tree is an American Elm (Ulmus Americana), and they are not extinct. The disease that afflicted them was known as the Dutch Elm Disease.

Elms are most vulnerable to the disease as they mature. Young American Elms remain abundant in Michigan, and other native elms (Slippery and Rock) are common.

The Emerald Ash Borer problem appears much more virulent than Dutch Elm disease. No ashes show resistance to the borer, mortality is quick and somewhere near 100%. When it moves into a woodlot, the ash trees die pronto. In my neck of SE Michigan, you cannot find a health White Ash (Fraxinus Americana). The disease is equally deadly on Red/Green Ash, Black Ash, and Blue Ash.
 
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