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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm putting a new wood transom board on the back of a 50 year old Starcraft Seafarer, the one on it had been replaced sometime in the past, and was pretty sloppily done.

My question is, the one I took out has threaded rod run through it vertically in 4 spots with washers and nuts on each end, are these necessary? I'll do it if needed, but are they?
 

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no the threaded rods are some cob job just replace the wood with new and go out and use your boat. if you think about it the rod running through it would weaken the wood front to back force from the motor pushing on the transom . steve k8vol
 

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Most transoms are about 1-1/2" thick. I'd get a piece of 3/4 exterior grade BC plywood. See if you can get the old transom out in one piece. (or at least as close to one piece as possible) Cut two pieces of the new ply slightly larger than the original transom. Get some good quality epoxy and laminate the two pieces of new ply together. Clamp it down tight and let it cure. When cured, lay the old transom on top and trace it out. Cut the new one out and make final adjustments until it fits well. When it's the right size and shape, coat the ENTIRE thing with a couple more coats of the epoxy. Do the inside, outside, AND the edges! When it's dry and cured. Reinstall it.

Don't use pressure treated! Some will say that you have to use "marine grade" ply. You can if you want, but it's going to be about three times the price and you're still going to have to seal it with epoxy. The good grade exterior BC plywood will be fine. "BC" is the grade of the finish on each side. When you laminate it, put the best two sides OUT. That will look best.

Good luck!

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys! I found some 3/4" exterior grade plywood in my uncles shop today that I liberated, have the 2 pieces cut to size, now to get some epoxy. When I saw those threaded rods thru it I know I was dealing with some sort of hack job. The boat is a 1961 and doesn't take on a bit of water, the transom was still pretty solid, came out in one piece. Only reason I am replacing it is to raise it up to make it a 20" back instead of 15" so I can use my 20" 4 stroke kicker from the big boat on it and get it to actually plane, with the long motor it likes to point its nose in the air a bit... lol
 

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Thanks guys! I found some 3/4" exterior grade plywood in my uncles shop today that I liberated, have the 2 pieces cut to size, now to get some epoxy. When I saw those threaded rods thru it I know I was dealing with some sort of hack job. The boat is a 1961 and doesn't take on a bit of water, the transom was still pretty solid, came out in one piece. Only reason I am replacing it is to raise it up to make it a 20" back instead of 15" so I can use my 20" 4 stroke kicker from the big boat on it and get it to actually plane, with the long motor it likes to point its nose in the air a bit... lol
The pressure treated wood (sometimes called exterior) will eat your transom and hull away if it is treated with chemicals. You can't use treated wood on a aluminum boat anywhere, ever, they do not mix, this will not work out well for you. Lowes and HD usually carry stuff called Arouco (sp) plywood that is a great untreated plywood-Douglas fir that is glued with waterproof glue, very few voids and no chemicals. John's description is pretty good on the process, of putting 2 pieces together and using epoxy. You can also use fiberglass resins and layup to seal the new wood for many years of use or do the epoxy route John speaks of. Make sure you seal all holes into the transom (fish finders and such) with 3m 5200 sealant. You will need to glue the new wood to your transom, the clamping process is an area that you must do well or the aluminum transom (skin) will separate from the wood and this is not good. I have some easy plans for home-made clamps, PM me if you want them. And I almost forgot, measure you existing transom thickness and make darn sure the one you install is exactly the same as what came out. This is a easy job on a tin boat, I just finished doing a glass transom, my stringers and floor were trash too. Anytime a transom goes bad it's almost a guarantee there is more rot under the floor, stringers, and the floor itself. If you are this deep already it would be wise to check the other areas that tend to rot too.
 
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