Michigan Sportsman Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'd like to start shooting my father's "old" recurve. It's a Bear Grizzly from sometime in the 1970's. My question is, since I really haven't figured out a good way to string it, how long can I leave the string on it without harming the bow? Also, I've been told that there are products that aide in stringing the bow for reasonable prices, where can I find them?
If you could, please respond to me at [email protected].
Thanks in advance
Nick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,892 Posts
Nick,
You should definitely use a stringer especially with the older recurves to avoid twisting a limb. Most places that sell recurves will carry stringers for a couple bucks. I wouldn't keep the bow strung for real long periods of time, but if you are shooting regularly, like every day, you could keep it strung for several days at a time. Just make sure you store it in a way where it doesn't cause stress on either limb.;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
420 Posts
Please be VERY careful when stringing the bow. I watched a fellow at our MTB Jamboree do the step through method and as he wrapped the bow around his leg, the upper limb slipped. He completely destroyed a ventage early '60s Bear recurve. He was dunbfounded...I cried! It was a beautiful bow.

Go to www.threeriversarchery.com, and order a stringer for a recurve bow. They are cheap even with the shipping. And Three Rivers will have it to you very quickly.


Best of luck, Arch
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
3 Rivers are great people. Look through their online catalog or call them up. They will spend all the time in the world answering your questions.

If you live within a days drive :) from Kalamazoo, you might want to consider going to the Traditional Bow show the weekend of January 23 - 25. All kinds of great goodies!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
Definitely use a stringer. Ever look at those old bows at garage sales? Most have the bottom limb twisted from improper stringing or from being stood up in a corner - never do that. I have two old Bear bows from the 50's both still weigh what the poundage on the riser says. I leave my bows strung most of the year. Some I shoot regularly, some I don't. Never lost poundage on any of them. I make sure that they are hung up away from excessive heat or cold. 45# is enough bow for most game. That's all anybody shot in the 60's. I used to shoot 70#, but my elbow likes my 52# bow better. A heavy arrow (600 grains), sharp head a clean release and a straight flying arrow (that's the key - don't have an arrow that is wobbling toward your target). That will do the job.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top