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My folks are getting into birding some, keeps them active as they get up there in age. My mom is looking for a book to help identify birds, preferably one that is pretty straight forward and is fairly colorful. They are primarily in northern Michigan. Thank you in advance for your recommendations.
 

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My folks are getting into birding some, keeps them active as they get up there in age. My mom is looking for a book to help identify birds, preferably one that is pretty straight forward and is fairly colorful. They are primarily in northern Michigan. Thank you in advance for your recommendations.
Well I used the Birds of Detroit by Chris C. Fisher, and Allen T. Charter. I googled it and it came right up on amazon so, it's still available. It'll get them started. There are also groups who take tours around the state to see birds. You could also mention the eagles at fermi in the winter.
https://www.amazon.com/Birds-Detroit-U-S-City-Guides/dp/1551051265
 

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My folks are getting into birding some, keeps them active as they get up there in age. My mom is looking for a book to help identify birds, preferably one that is pretty straight forward and is fairly colorful. They are primarily in northern Michigan. Thank you in advance for your recommendations.
I would encourage them to go to a bookstore to check them out. The Peterson Guide might be the gold standard. I really like my National Geographic bird guide.
I would suggest one that covers eastern North America since Michigan gets lots of traffic spring and fall. A less comprehensive backyard guide works well for a bit then if they really get into it they will be grabbing the bigger book.
The ones with actual photos aren’t as good as the ones with drawings in my opinion.
The artist drawn guide seem to accentuate the little markings that help identify a bird. (The fine white lines on the outer edge of a dark eyed junco’s tail for instance.)
 

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If you have any seed stores that sell bird seed and feeders they usually have a lot of them on the shelf
Those are the people to ask. The people running these wild bird stores will know the local birds and the best books to use. They sell them too.

My folks are getting into birding some, keeps them active as they get up there in age. My mom is looking for a book to help identify birds, preferably one that is pretty straight forward and is fairly colorful. They are primarily in northern Michigan. Thank you in advance for your recommendations.
I stop at Wild Birds Unlimited in Royal Oak and have always had my questions answered. There is a Wild Birds Unlimited in Traverse City that is locally owned. Have your parents talk to the owner or manager for advice.
 

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Those are the people to ask. The people running these wild bird stores will know the local birds and the best books to use. They sell them too.



I stop at Wild Birds Unlimited in Royal Oak and have always had my questions answered. There is a Wild Birds Unlimited in Traverse City that is locally owned. Have your parents talk to the owner or manager for advise.
Wild Birds Unlimited is the place that we went to. There use to be one in HL and then they moved to Cadillac. I don't know if they are still there. The book we use was the one I got for m mother when I was 15 or 16. I tell my wife that some of the birds in it are extinct now it is so old
 

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Wild Birds Unlimited is the place that we went to. There use to be one in HL and then they moved to Cadillac. I don't know if they are still there. The book we use was the one I got for m mother when I was 15 or 16. I tell my wife that some of the birds in it are extinct now it is so old
The dusky seaside sparrow comes to mind!
 

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I would encourage them to go to a bookstore to check them out. The Peterson Guide might be the gold standard. I really like my National Geographic bird guide.
I would suggest one that covers eastern North America since Michigan gets lots of traffic spring and fall. A less comprehensive backyard guide works well for a bit then if they really get into it they will be grabbing the bigger book.
The ones with actual photos aren’t as good as the ones with drawings in my opinion.
The artist drawn guide seem to accentuate the little markings that help identify a bird. (The fine white lines on the outer edge of a dark eyed junco’s tail for instance.)
This would be the best answer to your question by far.
 
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