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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the market for a new deer hunting rifle. I finally narrowed it down to the .270 due to its quick and flat shooting. I know there are many quality manufactures out there everybody has there own reasons why they chose a certain brand. My question is, should I avoid a certain brand, model, etc? Thanks for your opinion!
 

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I don't think that you can go wrong with a .270....some people think that they are too light for elk, ect but when I was out in Wyoming last year, ALL the guides I hunted with used .270s and used them to fill thier elk tags. As for rifles, you didn't mention an action type, but if you are looking at a turnbolt, I would suggest either a Ruger M77 or a Remington 700. I currently shoot a Interarms Mark X Viscount in .30-06, and I know that it came in .270 caliber. It has served me well over the years. I don't know if it is still being manufactured or not. As for guns to stay away from, I have heard of guys having problems with Browning turnbolts (failure to feed; failure to fire) and that the Winchester M70 is not the gun it used to be. This is second hand knowledge, though, so I wouldn't rely on it too heavily. Maybe Pat Eddinger has some more insight on this one? Good luck, and keep us posted on what you decide to get!
 

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as i reply to all what gun questions call the guys who fix em for a living ask at least three gunsmiths what guns seem to keep poping up for repairs and allow a process of elimination try to stay away from there personal views except for the gunsmith you would use and just try to find out what they see the most of in for repairs
 

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I started using a .270 for my deer hunting 7 years ago. I bought a Browning BAR Safari II and have shot around 20 deer with it.

Good gun, and a good caliber choice!

If you elect to buy a Browning, my advice is not to waste the extra $$$ by buying the BOSS system. I don't have it on mine, and yet I get 1" groups @ 100 yds using Federal Premium 130 gr. Sierra Boat-tails.

Speaking only from my experience with the gun, it has been an extremely reliable rifle. More than once I have used it in below-zero temps and it has cycled repeatedly without failure upon firing.

If you want a bolt, IMHO its hard to beat the Model 700. Remington has the new BDL DM model, which stands for 'detachable magazine', and this is a nice feature.
 

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Watercop,
Honestly now,I see a good mix of busted rifles,and those that need tuning.
Last year there was a trend developing with Rem.700's with oddball chambers that were way off center,and stocks inletted off centerline so the action was cocked to the side a bit,and barrels bored off center.
It had me flummoxed!I probably sent 15 brand new 700's back to Rem for problems that were just stupid.Then came the Winnie M70 classics that had obcene tooling marks in the action,and bad bedding.
Through it all the Ruger 77MKII,and the Tikka whitetail 595 has been the constant.
This year,and more so lately,the 700's have been outstanding,and the M70's have really gone downhill in my opinion.and still the Tikka and Rugers march on.
Here's the scoop.The Rugers come as sound shooters with some love needed to max out their potential,the 700's need the same love, but have greater accuracy potential.
Out of the box the Tikka's just flat don't need anything but possibly a trigger ADJUSTMENT and the directions for doing so are in the manual.
I'm a die hard controlled round feed advocate,and consider myself a M70 fan,however I couldn't advise buying one of the current offerings till Win. gets a handle on their problems,I know I wouldn't buy one myself unless I just needed the action for a project rifle.
The Ruger triggers need BIG love out of the box and it's the number one complaint I get about them.$45.00 should get you a smoothed out lightened trigger from a good 'smith.
Floating and bedding should run you around$65.00 and generally brings it to a reliable MOA shooting rifle.
The 700 has an adjustable trigger,but will need to have the barrel floated and action bedded for best accuracy,unless you buy one of the 700's with the H.S. precision stocks where only a bedding "Skim" is needed for the ultimate in skin tight bedding.
If you do a 700 and don't like synthetic, look hard at the Laminated stock models.
I think they are a good looking rifle,and have found they only need a float to shoot real well,and bedding is just icing on the cake.The 700's with the flat black finish on the bolt makes the action scratchy when compared to the blued BDL's and most guy's have me polish the "Way's" to smooth them out.The Tikka's on the other hand are slicker than snot on a door knob when dry and right out of the box.The only thing I find distracting with the Tikka is the cost for rings ($90.00!) but they are works of engineering art,and because of their strength will tolerate anything short of purposefull abuse without shifting.
The cost of replacement magazines is also a bit steep at $45.00 ea,but should last a lifetime.
One final caveat.Barrel break in is absolutely needed on ALL new rifles these days thanks to the use of hammer forgings instead of the button method.
The button literally smoothes out any open pores and negates most reamer chatter marks in the grooves.
The hammer forging process leaves a rougher tube by nature and the high speed process makes it worse,because of laborers on a time schedule not cleaning the forming mandrel as often as they should.They no longer lap each barrel as it comes off the line either,so there will be all sorts of industrial lube and filth pressed into the bore from factory test firing.The best way to deal with all this is a pre-break in "Boiling out" using hot water and a nylon bore brush to break down the wax/mica lube used to lubricate the forming mandrel that is pressed into the bore.Conventional solvents will NOT remove the forming lube,elbow grease and hot water will though,but it takes some work/love to get it out.Once down to naked steel,commence to breaking it with the one shot&clean method
and things should come around in 10-20 rounds.Were it me(And yes I know it's not)I would grab a tikka at the same cost as a 77MKII and a bit less than the 700,Break it in and be done with it.
BTW.For deer the .270 just works.Out to 300yds it will hold even with the 7mmRem mag in trajectory,and the difference between it and the '06 up to 150gr bullet weights is mostly in the mind of the shooter.If you reload you can do all sorts of fun stuff with the lighter varmint bullets,and ammo can be found in the "twodot" hardware,world wide.Whatever you decide to choose,try to find a Davidsons dealer and get it through them.The rifles come with a Lifetime warranty against ALL failures,even reloading booboos,and the running it over with the truck incidents,at no cost for repair or replacement to the owner.Check out the web site: www.galleryofguns.com and do a dealer search.They will cost 2-5% more but that's the cost of the Warranty.Good luck to ya!Pat
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Pat,
After checking on prices of the Rem 700, winn m70, ruger, and tikka, the only one that fell in my price range is the Rem 700 ADL syn stock at $543.00. Now I need to find some that wants to buy/trade a .300 Savage in great condition. Let me know what you have available and prices maybe we can do busisness. You are only 2.5 hours away from Ferris and my buddies are always in the mood for a road trip.
 

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Watercop,
Gimme a holler [email protected] or on the hooks,toll free 1-888-811-9039.
Ya don't want to be driving down here for several days as the manitou has the war machine wound up tight!I can give you some better prices than you found.
what type of .300sav? Model 99? got a couple of old timers that would adopt you for a good one!Cheers!Pat
 
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