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I'm looking for photos of wildlife, particularly whitetail deer, taken with the use of drones. If you have any and are willing to share, please text (517) 290-6471. Photos may appear in a popular hunting magazine. Thanks.
 

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Tornado Jim
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20,026 Posts
I'm looking for photos of wildlife, particularly whitetail deer, taken with the use of drones. If you have any and are willing to share, please text (517) 290-6471. Photos may appear in a popular hunting magazine. Thanks.
Hard to get. The deer scatter when I fly my drone near them, even when it is up high.
 

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If you have deer pictures from a drone:

1) Don't take any money
2) If they get published - keep your name as the drone operator out of it.

That would be considered commercial drone use, and would almost certainly not be legal.

If they were taken prior to mid-August... any commercial use would be an FAA violation. Post August they fall under the following rules -

Regulations for unmanned aircraft drones weighing less than 55 pounds that are conducting non-hobbyist operations:

1) Get a waiver from FAA

2) The person actually flying a drone must be at least 16 years old and have a remote pilot certificate with a small UAS rating, or be directly supervised by someone with such a certificate. To qualify for a remote pilot certificate, an individual must either pass an initial aeronautical knowledge test at an FAA-approved knowledge testing center or have an existing non-student Part 61 pilot certificate. If qualifying under the latter provision, a pilot must have completed a flight review in the previous 24 months and must take a UAS online training course provided by the FAA. The TSA will conduct a security background check of all remote pilot applications prior to issuance of a certificate.
 

·
Tornado Jim
Joined
·
20,026 Posts
If you have deer pictures from a drone:

1) Don't take any money
2) If they get published - keep your name as the drone operator out of it.

That would be considered commercial drone use, and would almost certainly not be legal.

If they were taken prior to mid-August... any commercial use would be an FAA violation. Post August they fall under the following rules -

Regulations for unmanned aircraft drones weighing less than 55 pounds that are conducting non-hobbyist operations:

1) Get a waiver from FAA

2) The person actually flying a drone must be at least 16 years old and have a remote pilot certificate with a small UAS rating, or be directly supervised by someone with such a certificate. To qualify for a remote pilot certificate, an individual must either pass an initial aeronautical knowledge test at an FAA-approved knowledge testing center or have an existing non-student Part 61 pilot certificate. If qualifying under the latter provision, a pilot must have completed a flight review in the previous 24 months and must take a UAS online training course provided by the FAA. The TSA will conduct a security background check of all remote pilot applications prior to issuance of a certificate.
I like this one too Pesky.

I wanted to start flying drones commercially but would not have been able to under the old rules with a waiver, which required a pilot's license--or at least would have had to hire a pilot). Much more reasonable requirements now. I plan on getting certified (if I can pass the test).
 
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