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A few pointers for taking pictures of your deer (or any other fish or game)

Now I don’t claim to be an expert or a professional by any means, but I have learned a few things over the years. Please take these as helpful suggestions to assist you in taking your photos.

Deer – Make the deer the object in the picture. It’s OK to show your bright, shiny face, your weapon, or your kids, but remember that the deer is the reason for the picture. Make sure that you don’t shoot from too far away and that the object of the picture fills the frame as much as possible. Background can make or break a picture, but too much is not always better.

Rack - Unless your deer has such a massive rack that it doesn’t matter, try to keep your hands away from it. You also should put some distance between the person in the picture and the antlers by staying behind them. It’ll make them jump out of the picture at the viewer and also make them look just a little bit bigger (this is also a nice tip for fish pictures).

Blood – Clean it up. No need for the photo to look like a crime scene.

Tongue – Put it back in. These are beautiful animals, so let’s be as respectful as possible.

Background – How many times do we see deer in the back of pickup next to 3 or 4 crushed beer cans or in the garage between the overflowing garbage can and the oil spot on the floor? Or the deer hanging from the rafters like the lynch mob just left. It’ll generally help if you take the pictures out in the field. Your background is built in and nearly foolproof.

Vantage point – The best pictures are taken at the deer’s level. Get down on the ground and try not to shoot downward unless that is the only option, or the desired angle.


A professional photographer will take hundreds if not thousands of shots just to get a handful of good ones. Don’t be afraid to change vantage points, angles, backgrounds, or to take a few extra shots looking for the desired results. Today’s digital cameras can help show you the photos immediately, but still, take a bunch and check them all out later. You will notice that some came out better than others upon a second look. Also, look at the pictures that you see in the magazines. Not just the object of the picture, but look at how the best in the business take their pictures. It will certainly give you some pointers for taking your own stills.

Good Luck this fall, and I look forward to seeing all those awesome shots.
 

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A few pointers for taking pictures of your deer (or any other fish or game)

Rack - Unless your deer has such a massive rack that it doesn’t matter, try to keep your hands away from it. You also should put some distance between the person in the picture and the antlers by staying behind them. It’ll make them jump out of the picture at the viewer and also make them look just a little bit bigger (this is also a nice tip for fish pictures).
You gonna get ripped on this site for saying that!!...LOL!!!:lol:

Scott
 

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Blood – Clean it up. No need for the photo to look like a crime scene.

Yes, I seen in a video some time ago, that they suggested using Windex to clean the blood off the animal with a paper towel. I have taken many pictures of animals, and tryed this method 2 years ago. I think the pictures came out really good, take a look for yourself in this link, should be the last set of pictures.

http://www.michigan-sportsman.com/forum/showthread.php?t=247085&page=5

I am far from a pro at picture taking, but I do like to try different angles when taking pics, it makes it fun!
 

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Great tips! I'll add...do not sit on the deer, this is not the WWF. Pet peave of mine, I know it's subjective but in my opinion wrecks a picture.
 

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A few pointers for taking pictures of your deer (or any other fish or game)

Now I don’t claim to be an expert or a professional by any means, but I have learned a few things over the years. Please take these as helpful suggestions to assist you in taking your photos.

Deer – Make the deer the object in the picture. It’s OK to show your bright, shiny face, your weapon, or your kids, but remember that the deer is the reason for the picture. Make sure that you don’t shoot from too far away and that the object of the picture fills the frame as much as possible. Background can make or break a picture, but too much is not always better.

Rack - Unless your deer has such a massive rack that it doesn’t matter, try to keep your hands away from it. You also should put some distance between the person in the picture and the antlers by staying behind them. It’ll make them jump out of the picture at the viewer and also make them look just a little bit bigger (this is also a nice tip for fish pictures).

Blood – Clean it up. No need for the photo to look like a crime scene.

Tongue – Put it back in. These are beautiful animals, so let’s be as respectful as possible.

Background – How many times do we see deer in the back of pickup next to 3 or 4 crushed beer cans or in the garage between the overflowing garbage can and the oil spot on the floor? Or the deer hanging from the rafters like the lynch mob just left. It’ll generally help if you take the pictures out in the field. Your background is built in and nearly foolproof.

Vantage point – The best pictures are taken at the deer’s level. Get down on the ground and try not to shoot downward unless that is the only option, or the desired angle.


A professional photographer will take hundreds if not thousands of shots just to get a handful of good ones. Don’t be afraid to change vantage points, angles, backgrounds, or to take a few extra shots looking for the desired results. Today’s digital cameras can help show you the photos immediately, but still, take a bunch and check them all out later. You will notice that some came out better than others upon a second look. Also, look at the pictures that you see in the magazines. Not just the object of the picture, but look at how the best in the business take their pictures. It will certainly give you some pointers for taking your own stills.

Good Luck this fall, and I look forward to seeing all those awesome shots.
Great tips! I'll add...do not sit on the deer, this is not the WWF. Pet peave of mine, I know it's subjective but in my opinion wrecks a picture.
Great post(s)!!! Hope you don't mind...I'm going to post this over on OS.com :D
 
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