Michigan Sportsman Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,447 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
https://theoutdoorforum.net/index.php/2018/10/05/pheasant-hunting/

This is a very well written article and exactly how approach hunting pheasants that has the insight to be more successful hunting the pheasant.
I always have a plan.This is a great read.
Those who know me and hunt with me will get it even more.

I almost always work fields diagonally from one corner to the other to throw them off and prevent them from skirting around me.

Everytime I pull up to a spot I try to roll out as fast as possible because they are already aware of your presence.
To my hunting buddy's this is why I am always harping to get rolling.Being leisurely and preparing at the parking spot allows birds to put greater distances between us and they will leave without you seeing them.


I liked the part about hunting on an empty stomach.(Sorry Mark4866 lol.)I personally will hunt all day without a meal and just have a large meal that night.It is like a hunt mode.This year I have been doing a lunch when with others come but I have noticed that we lose a lot of steam and focus.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
517 Posts
Lunch is unnecessary if you are hunting all day. You just need Kars sweet and salty trail mix to snack on between hunts and maybe an apple. That’s the key to success. If you are slumping switch to a couple gummy worms or sour skittles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
Great read! I did a preserve over the weekend, and while not quite the same as hunting wild birds there is alot that is applicable here. Specifically to how you drive a field. Our first drive we pushed the birds in a direction that allowed them to run off the property line and get away from us. Second drive we actually thought it through and changed the direction of our drive where we pinched the birds off and forced them to flush.

Anyways, thanks for posting.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,891 Posts
https://theoutdoorforum.net/index.php/2018/10/05/pheasant-hunting/

Everytime I pull up to a spot I try to roll out as fast as possible because they are already aware of your presence.
To my hunting buddy's this is why I am always harping to get rolling.Being leisurely and preparing at the parking spot allows birds to put greater distances between us and they will leave without you seeing them.
This is the truth....
I have one spot, great field with everything in it to hold birds year around kinda like the complete package of grasses and food. When we go to this field I make sure of a few things...
- Park as close to the road when I pull in, less noise the better
- Dogs are already geared up, collars on and not in crates. I leave them in the back seat, so I don't make any noises opening kennels.
- Shells in hand when I pull in so I ain't searching for them.
- Gun is accessible and can be out and loaded in 10 seconds of door shutting
Reasons being in this situation is, 95% of the time I hit this field one of my dogs has a bird pinned within 1 minute of letting them go. There's 3 entrances into this field, all 3 are the same situation. This there only field of all of them I hunt that are like this for whatever reason

One other big rule for me and whomever I hunt with is work slow. I've hunted with too many people that walk to fast and not let the dogs work an area. I have bigger running dogs, I let them work all over and I try to stay away from them unless they're on point. I don't wanna get in their way

Usually always hunt there food whenever I can first also. It used to drive me nuts because I always thought my dogs were just having fun running full speed thru the small patches of corn. But, I think when they're running thru it full speed it pushes the pheasants out into the grass then the dogs circle around and pin them. That's happening more and more, tho there's times when the birds will flush but we get more birds that way then birds that flush outta range

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,080 Posts
Great read! Thanks for the share!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
My Dad and I went to SD a few years ago and we used Dennis as our outfitter. Would recommend him for anyone that is looking for that type of hunt, because he is avid bird hunter himself and seemed to really take pride in providing a awesome hunting experience. He also did not turn his nose up that our group was just my Dad, me and our GSP.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,447 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
My Dad and I went to SD a few years ago and we used Dennis as our outfitter. Would recommend him for anyone that is looking for that type of hunt, because he is avid bird hunter himself and seemed to really take pride in providing a awesome hunting experience. He also did not turn his nose up that our group was just my Dad, me and our GSP.
That's what a typical bird hunt is.A couple people and a dog.That is the best experience for most.Most want to make as much as possible in a season and small hunting parties wallets but it is an industry.And those states wouldn't have the birds without the revenues being brought in.
A hat tip to Dennis:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,087 Posts
Neat article. The tip of hunting fields diagonally is spot on.

The season before this one, my son in law and I hunted NW Iowa just before Christmas.

We started on public land and found it very difficult to flush birds in range.

We then went to a piece of private land that I have permission to hunt. This land is about 160 acres of CRP with 3 corners bordering plowed agricultural land.

We soon discovered by pushing toward the corners, and stopping about 100 yards from a corner and allowing the dog to work, we were rewarded with several solid points and in range flushes. Often 6 to 8 birds per corner. Very few birds flushed mid field.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top