Michigan Sportsman Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
36,175 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last fall I planted a perinneal rye plot. It sure came in good, but I've been told it's of little value for attracting and nourishing deer. Should I just hit this plot with RoundUP in the spring and cut my losses?

Any suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,099 Posts
Steve said:
Should I just hit this plot with RoundUP in the spring and cut my losses?

Any suggestions?
I did 2 years ago, but first I frost-seeded a combination of brassica and clovers in Febuary (kinda early but it worked), then the glyphosate in the spring to kill the rye just prior to the brassica/clover germination.

I'm glad I did.
 
G

·
Steve we are talking about perennial rye grass not rye grain, right?

This grass is eaten by deer and is avialable as early as the earliest forage out there and can reach 30% protein. That's about the extent of its value. Cattle will eat it the entire summer, but then deer are not cows.

Steve, you can leave a small area for early deer forage and the rest can be replanted. This stuff grows a decent amount of organic matter and you might think about killing it with Roundup after the grass has grown to maturity, mid June. Then spray and till a few weeks later for a timely super duper attractant plot of forage deer cannot resist. The green manure that you let grow and shallow tilled into the soil will help hold moisture, (you do have sand). Plan on an early August planting for maximum forage attraction or late August for grains, just in time for the hunting seasons. Make sure the plot is soil tested and corrected to a high level.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,116 Posts
Steve,

If this is the same field you have had for a couple of years I think I remember it being extremely small. With the type of soil you have annual rye is very hard to beat...it will give you the best chance of competing with the browsing by the local deer herd and will grow hardily in the worst conditions and coldest temperatures. Clovers, alfalfa, brassicas will all be dirt-level during he hunting season and offer virtually nothing to you or the local deer herd.

If you want to plant a crop during the summer, wait until the rye is growing and a few inches high, kill it, and broadcast buckwheat when the chance of frosts and freezes is over....for example that is 6/1 up here in the U.P. You can leave the buckwheat for a couple of months, which is one of the best soil builders and competes with weeds very well, and then kill it in late July to mid August, and plant annual rye/rye grain, around Labor Day. On a small plot though, you'll most likely keep beating your head against a wall if you stick with any of the perennials.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top