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Had a great opportunity to spend 2 days at a great camp in Lycoming County, central PA for the gun opener today (11/28). Arrived Sunday evening to the smell of wood smoke and a warm cabin, where I met some new friends and enjoyed a turkey dinner cooked in a coal fired oven. The evening was spent talking about the next day's hunt, and I taught the PA guys Euchre, which they liked.

The hunting is so different, but yet so familiar. The differences lie mainly in the terrain and flora. Very very hilly, and we were hunting field edges with hemlock/beech/maple forests. Regulations where we were hunting are 3 antler points on one side. None of us were hunting does. The similarities are the anticipation of the hunt, the walk into the woods, respect for the game animal, and the comraderie.

The alarm went off at 5:15 a.m. and we all went about getting ready, making coffee and eating breakfast. Two gentlemen higher on the camp totem pole than myself, walked me to my stand about 1/4 mile from the cabin, and about 300 feet higher in elevation. It was "old school" for me since I did not have my climbing stand. So I parked myself at the base of 2 beech trees and waited for first light. Temps were in the 40s, with moderate fog and winds high in the trees. Shooting light came, and a few shots were heard here and there around the valley. 11:20am came around, and as I was reaching into the pack for a sandwich, a volley of four nearby 30-06 reports shattered the silence. I got ready for deer to come my way, but it didn't happen. After another hour, I walked some thickets with another hunter from our group. After lunch, I sat in a stand in a hemlock/oak grove, adjacent to a clover and corn field. The first picture is looking straight ahead of me, to the north. The second picture is looking to my right, to the east. At last light, I saw a doe to the east skirting the clover. I put my crosshairs on her but didn't pull the hammer back, climbed down and headed back to the cabin.





Returning to the cabin, I saw our group standing outside around a deer being skinned. A very nice 6 point was killed by a hunter in our group, who fired the 4 shots at 11:20am. This deer was probably 2.5 yrs old, had very long brow tines and a good spread. Probably near 150 lbs, a very handsome buck.

After the skinning was done, we went inside to stoke the wood stove and get dinner started, which was cooked on a second wood stove. After a great dinner, and a toast to the successful hunter, I had to pack up and get back to reality. This "work" thing keeps getting in the way. ;)

This was a great hunt due to the forming of new friendships, and seeing another facet of deer hunting. I am beginning to see the benefit of antler point restrictions, and hunting different terrain definitely made me a better hunter in some small way. I encourage anyone who has the opportunity to hunt as many different types of terrain and cover as possible. It will allow you to improve your skills as a hunter, and will likely mean you meet many more good hunters along the way, who share your interest in deer hunting.
 

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Outstanding story! What a nice view you had. I had to laugh when you stated that you taught them ucher. It's so funny how most outside of Michigan have never even heard of this game! :lol:
 
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