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I'm not ruling out synthetic entirely, but am attracted to wood, if for no other reason than I already own a bunch of synthetic stock rifles.

I don't mind adding some 'patina' to wood either.

I don't expect the stock to be pristine when I give it to my kids, but it shouldn't be brittle and falling apart like some cheap synthetic might do.
Check with your kids about what they expect of your possessions in time.
I delivered my Dads pet deer rifle for some one else outside his kids to receive recently.
Much as I like rifles , and Dads memory....

With young kids , just get a quality rifle you like. It will have been yours when heirloom time comes.
That matters more than lock stock and barrel choice.
 

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Check with your kids about what they expect of your possessions in time.
I delivered my Dads pet deer rifle for some one else outside his kids to receive recently.
Much as I like rifles , and Dads memory....

With young kids , just get a quality rifle you like. It will have been yours when heirloom time comes.
That matters more than lock stock and barrel choice.
Yeah truth.. but I have girls so I didnt choose a 300 mag lol.
 

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So I'm hoping you also cut all the strings off your clothes a make sure that tag on your belt buckle is between 2 to 4 inches. Shave everyday even on leave and weekends and get your haircut faded down to zero every single week.

While you're at it, make sure and clean all carbon anywhere on your rifle so it won't come out with a q tip. Certainly necessary for reliability and accuracy.

Now learn to do manual arms with your hunting rifle. Port arms, right shoulder, left shoulder, order, present. Hey, they do it in the military.

Also make sure and shoot hundreds of rounds out of your rifle in one week during range and qualifying week. And hundreds if not thousands during live fire training. Then shoot hundreds or thousands of blanks that don't cycle reliability. Then do training where you dig a whole in the mud and rain and get you and your gear covered from head to toe in clay.

Next take your rifle in completely inhospitable climates like deserts or Asian jungles and sleep outside for weeks or months straight where sand, dirt or rain works it's way into every crevice of your body, weapon, and gear.

Finally, hire some trained armorers who do all the heavy duty long term cleaning and maintenance on the weapons.

After you do all this, please come back and talk to me about what military weapons maintenance has to tell me about punching the bore on my hunting rifle...which by the way is probably the lowest concern in your daily weapons maintenance.
And then when you do finally get back with me, please provide we with an actual reason why.

And until then, perhaps take this to another thread.
Whoever your mad at it isn't me. ;)
 

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Whoever your mad at it isn't me. ;)

I'm angry that I can't think of more ways to outfit hunting rifles just like they do in the military. Enough nasty civilian days for those hunting rifles. Time for battle. Everyone needs to turn to and get to it.

And don't forget you are only authorized to use break free clp to clean your rifle with. Clp, pipe cleaners, q tips, and lots and lots of time is all you'll need. Get busy.;)
 
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I'm angry that I can't think of more ways to outfit hunting rifles just like they do in the military. Enough nasty civilian days for those hunting rifles. Time for battle. Everyone needs to turn to and get to it.

And don't forget you are only authorized to use break free clp to clean your rifle with. Clp, pipe cleaners, q tips, and lots and lots of time is all you'll need. Get busy.;)
Pssst.
Your gig line's crooked...
 

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Get a Colt sauer, already an heirloom, and the slickest bolt action you will ever hold. Available in calibers from 22-250---458 magnum.
 

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Get a Colt sauer, already an heirloom, and the slickest bolt action you will ever hold. Available in calibers from 22-250---458 magnum.
Absolutely fine rifles. Buddy’s dad has one in 300wby and there will surely be hard feelings in the family when it is handed down.

A fine rifle like these can absolutely justify the cost of refinishing.
 

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I have a bunch of my Dad's guns and the one that means the most to me is his 22 WMR.
He squirrel hunted with it, that's when he started taking me hunting.
No fancy checkering, gold or stainless but there is no amount of money that you could give me for it.
 

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When was the last time you shot something in North America at over 300 yards? For me never so no big deal.
Well I shot a nice mule deer buck last fall at 345yrds and the year before an Antelope buck at 378 both ranged with rangefinders.. Planning on going out for elk in 2 years so.... Depends on what and where you hunt...
 

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Big difference in the Ruger American plastic stock and a quality synthetic stock for sure. I have a Ruger American and had to replace the stock ,went with a Boyd's laminate. View attachment 478223
I have that same exact stock on my Savage Alaskan stainless guide gun in .338WM. Bought the rifle on clearance at Jays in Clare and hated the cheap plastic stock.
 

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Ok, here' the scenario: You have a $2,000 budget to spend on an heirloom quality high powered hunting rifle that will kill everything up to and including a moose in North America.

This is a gun you will pass down to your kids, so you want it to be reliable and look beautiful 20 or 30 years from now.

You want the caliber to be large enough for moose, but not too exotic you can't find ammo in a pinch.

This gun will accompany you on many travels for many large game animals, so it needs to be able to withstand some abuse from a myriad of climate types. From Whitetail to Antelope to Elk to Black Bear to Caribou to Moose.

What do you buy? What brand? What caliber? What kind of stock? What finish?
I would go with a 30-06. I’ve taken whitetails, mule deer, 5 elk, pronghorn and caribou with it. Use a tough bullet for elk and moose and it will do the job. As far as a rifle, a Browning X Bolt is a great choice. Light weight and accurate. Wood is good looking but for me I like a synthetic stock. I restocked 2 of my rifles with synthetics. Both became consistent shooters. Previously they would change zero depending on weather. Buy a good scope. I put a Leupold 3.5 X 10 VX3 CDS on a 270 WSM. I’ve used it on several 300 yd shots. Worked as advertised.
The above setup will leave you with money for ammo. Use it to practice.
 

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MMMmmm Scooby Snacks RULE!
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Dad had a .300 Savage, brother had a bunch up to 7 mag, FIL had a 700 BDL in 30.06.
I bought a 7400 .06 - 18” Carbine & Wife wanted a 700 BDL similar to her dad's in 30.06 too.
We probably took shots out to around 250 yds and they never went far after dropping the maul.
Son & Daughter have the BDL's now & my 7400 went to a FOF for a great price and he uses it for deer and black bear when the lucky draw should come his way.

The reason I chose that caliber is because it's one of a few any small town gas station has in stock next to the 30-30 (which I'm not a fan of - regardless if they kill thousands of deer or not).
;)

Hunting walleye falls in the same time zone for me, so I decided on a more peaceful quest after many years...

More deer for those who would just love to fight over one.
:rolleyes:

If I got back into chasing them brown jumpers I'd probably get a 25.06 because it efficiently does what is required and shoots pretty flat.
We don't live in a perfect world, and the arms we use aren't either.
 
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