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ok I wanna field hunt but no farmers will let us hunt there fields does anyone know of any state land fields not tryin to pick off anyones spot but im desperate!!!! :(:lol:
 

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first off, how old are you? if your young (under18?) i would have a parent go with you just so it looks legit. Other than that just keep on trying buddy, you will find yourself some private fields. I know how it can be, i have gotten denied a couple times this week myself but i am getting up tommarow and giving it another try.:D
 

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I gave up on asking for permission a long time ago because of the same thing. It got to the point where it was just easier to look in my map book and focus my time on public lands that people dont neccessarily get to and hope for the best. Now if I have private land offered I will take them up on it but I dont bother asking. Sometimes its like asking for a million dollars the way they treat you. I guess in some areas there are better successes but I have seen too many areas getting leased by guides, now you have better have money to compete.
 

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Asking permission on fields is kinda like asking a chick out on a date. You walk up to them, hands all sweaty. You start a little small talk and feel like you want to turn and run away just when your about to pop the question. You can tell by their body language by now if its going to be a yes or no ( usually a no) but you ask anyway. And when they answer you really dont know how to react. If its a really hot field or chick and they say no,your crushed but if they say yes its like winning the lottery. With my job i can ask on fields every day and its usually one out of every twenty that will say yes. Like i said, its like asking a chick out. :lol: Dont give up, theres alot of fish in the sea. Be pollite and dont act cocky. Farmers hate cocky kids(i know because i grew up a farmer and i still hate cocky kids).:rant:
 

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State land fields are tough. There is a lot of water on state land that hold geese but they usually hold hunters too. I did see about 50 geese working a field out at Shiawassee last weekend, but there will probably be about 10 groups hunting them.
 

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Asking permission on fields is kinda like asking a chick out on a date. You walk up to them, hands all sweaty. You start a little small talk and feel like you want to turn and run away just when your about to pop the question. You can tell by their body language by now if its going to be a yes or no ( usually a no) but you ask anyway. And when they answer you really dont know how to react. If its a really hot field or chick and they say no,your crushed but if they say yes its like winning the lottery. With my job i can ask on fields every day and its usually one out of every twenty that will say yes. Like i said, its like asking a chick out. :lol: Dont give up, theres alot of fish in the sea. Be pollite and dont act cocky. Farmers hate cocky kids(i know because i grew up a farmer and i still hate cocky kids).:rant:

Are you advising he get them liquored up first??? Brilliant strategy!!:idea:
 

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Asking permission on fields is kinda like asking a chick out on a date. You walk up to them, hands all sweaty. You start a little small talk and feel like you want to turn and run away just when your about to pop the question. You can tell by their body language by now if its going to be a yes or no ( usually a no) but you ask anyway. And when they answer you really dont know how to react. If its a really hot field or chick and they say no,your crushed but if they say yes its like winning the lottery. With my job i can ask on fields every day and its usually one out of every twenty that will say yes. Like i said, its like asking a chick out. :lol: Dont give up, theres alot of fish in the sea. Be pollite and dont act cocky. Farmers hate cocky kids(i know because i grew up a farmer and i still hate cocky kids).:rant:
Good advice....Pintail......Mack
 

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I take them salmon fillets. They love those and the walleyes. All of the farmers that we deal with can't wait for us to show up with the fillets. We also give them a cut of the sausage and jerky that we make out of the geese. Be persistant and polite, persistance pays off.
 

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Don't feel bad. I don't have a field to hunt yet either. I won't even pick a field to hunt until after it gets dark the day before season. Then the decision is made. Hopefully this year there will have to be a decision between a couple of them.
 

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I can agree that persistance pays off. Last year I asked permission on a field and immediately got shot down. Well I kept BSing with the farmer and about 2 hours :dizzy: later he let me in. About two weeks later we limited out in 45min. Keep at it. You'll get turned away a lot more than you will get permission. Keeping that permission over the years is also key.
 

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No doubt it takes time but sometimes the easiest route works best. I called a farm last year out of the blue and it produced 24 out of my 29 geese I shot. If your going to ask I would let the owner know how many people you intended to hunt with you, you don't want to show up with ten shooters when the owner thought it was just you hunting there. I can't even hunt a woodshops land because this guy asked to hunt and showed up with 11 guys and cameras. Now the land is closed to hunting. Persistance may work, check in year after year.
 

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I have had great luck getting field permission, but I put a ton of effort into it. Here are my secrets:
1) Wash your truck, and dress reasonably well
2) State clearly your intentions regarding when, which days, how many people (very important)
4) Emphasize your Christian values, if you have them. If you don't DON'T LIE!
5) Offer $20-30 dollars per gun. This is better than a season lease, as the field eventually get gunned out. This strategy gives you flexibility versus financial commitment.
6) MOST important: have an attorney draft a liability waiver, sign it and show it to the farmer. Dumb a** hunters that hurt themselves and sue the landowners are why permission is so hard nowdays.
7) Show up on a Sunday in the summer with your crew and put in a day's work. This shows commitment on your part.
Remember, to the farmer you're a soft city boy that has leisure time to burn, unlike him. But if you sacrifice your time to help him, this will definitely get his attention.
Good luck, Happy Hunting
 

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Buy a plat book. It will give you an idea of who owns it before going up to the door. I am blessed to have plenty of areas to hunt around my house. I went with a friend on Sunday and was fortunate to pick another 200 plus acres. The one farmer said "How many can you shoot in a day?" Name drop if you know someone in the area. Good references go a long way in small communities. Tell them that you just want to goose hunt. Deer privileges are much more highly guarded. If you are going to goose hunt during deer season tell them you won't if someone is deer hunting. I find giving homemade stuff goes a long way. Giving fish or meat is nice but they still have to cook it. A rhubarb pie in a tin pan, so they don't have to return it, or muffins, homemade jam, coffe cake have been most appreciated. One thing I have learned and always remember when talking to farmers is that there is one thing they have plenty of......... pride. Offering money, gift certificates, per hunter fees in my opinion not what they are about. There are farmers out there that have gone into the hunting business but again I have been fortunate to have the opportunities that I do.

One place we went on Sunday had about 75 acres in stubble. He didn't think he wanted anyone hunting by the house. I told him we'd be in the middle of the field where the geese would land easier. He said no still. He has a bunch of beagles and I asked him if he hunted rabbits? He was at a field trial that morning. I invited him to hunt with me and with his dogs at property that I manage. I told him that the rabbits are there it's just that the cover I've planted is "too good" to hunt effectively by yourself. He said he'd love to run his dogs there. He doesn't even need to hunt. He said he would see if the farmer who works his field minded if we hunt there and to come back before the season opened.

I have never paid a dime to hunt geese but with building good relationships in the area I again am blessed with about 1000 acres to hunt within a 5 mile radius of my house. The furthest I have driven to hunt was 4.7 miles and that was on state land.

Good luck to everyone this season,

Ken
 

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I have had great luck getting field permission, but I put a ton of effort into it. Here are my secrets:
1) Wash your truck, and dress reasonably well
2) State clearly your intentions regarding when, which days, how many people (very important)
4) Emphasize your Christian values, if you have them. If you don't DON'T LIE!
5) Offer $20-30 dollars per gun. This is better than a season lease, as the field eventually get gunned out. This strategy gives you flexibility versus financial commitment.
6) MOST important: have an attorney draft a liability waiver, sign it and show it to the farmer. Dumb a** hunters that hurt themselves and sue the landowners are why permission is so hard nowdays.
7) Show up on a Sunday in the summer with your crew and put in a day's work. This shows commitment on your part.
Remember, to the farmer you're a soft city boy that has leisure time to burn, unlike him. But if you sacrifice your time to help him, this will definitely get his attention.
Good luck, Happy Hunting
your wrong on a couple things here.

1. if you offer money per gun and farmer takes it......hes can be sued in event that hes negligent.
2. farmers are protected from this very instance but not if they take money from it.
3. find the law (there is one specifically to address this for farmers) print it off and have with you to reassure the farmer that he is safe in case of accident.
 

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Just remeber they will never knock on your door asking you to hunt their field so just know the percentages suck but it will pay off sooner or later....

I'm still waiting for my sooner and/or later!
 

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your wrong on a couple things here.

1. if you offer money per gun and farmer takes it......hes can be sued in event that hes negligent.
2. farmers are protected from this very instance but not if they take money from it.
3. find the law (there is one specifically to address this for farmers) print it off and have with you to reassure the farmer that he is safe in case of accident.
The law is under the "Recreational Trespass" part of the Conservation Law. If a famer/owner takes money they are providing a service. Verbal permission is all that is needed, written is nice for the other guys that sometimes show up saying "they have exclusive rights". If you take money from other hunters to take them you are responsible for them. That is another thing, there is no such thing as a licensed guide in Michigan. If someone takes you hunting in there boat and takes money from you they have to have a charter license with a boat inspection.

Actual wording from www.michigan.gov

324.73107 Action for injury to person on property of another; exception.

Sec. 73107.

(1) Except as provided in subsection (2), a cause of action shall not arise against the owner, tenant, or lessee of property for an injury to a person who is on that property with oral or written consent but who has not paid the owner, tenant, or lessee of that property valuable consideration for the recreational or trapping use of the property, unless the injury was caused by the gross negligence or willful and wanton misconduct of the owner, tenant, or lessee.

(2) A cause of action shall not arise against the owner, tenant, or lessee of property for an injury to a person who is on that property with oral or written consent and has paid the owner, tenant, or lessee valuable consideration for fishing, trapping, or hunting on that property, unless that person's injuries were caused by a condition that involved an unreasonable risk of harm and all of the following apply:

(a) The owner, tenant, or lessee knew or had reason to know of the condition or risk.

(b) The owner, tenant, or lessee failed to exercise reasonable care to make the condition safe or to warn the person of the condition or risk.

(c) The person injured did not know or did not have reason to know of the condition or risk.




Ken
 

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I don't presume to know the ins and outs of the legal profession. We (my group) are of the mentality to assume our own responsibilities. The waiver of liability is meant to convey to the farmer this mentality, and give them piece of mind. I'm sure most farmers don't know this nuance either.

Are you part of the Kilpatrick dream team, by any chance?

In the case where we paid $25.00 per gun to hunt, this was to a widow of a farmer who was impaled on a hay rake. How could I not offer to help her out, as well as helping us?
Plus, she got her massage therapist's license so, at 10:00AM every hunt, I left the field to get my deep tissue massage. Hold your comments, perverts!!!!
This was another way to help someone in obvious need.
All I spew is my own experiences, you are all free to use it as a strategy, or toilet paper.
 

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most farmers are unaware of this legal trespass protection and this law has helped us gain access many times by bringing it to the attention of the farmer.

I'm not saying what your doing is wrong, i'm just pointing out that simply having something to prove to the farmer that he is protected by law.

As an instance (kevlar or sean can verify) a field that was hunted regularly by a certain group every year was awesome til someone came in and paid to hunt it by offering money to the farmer to lock it up.....then said hunter got hurt and sued the farmer. Now no one can hunt that piece anymore.

Sometimes hunters think they are helping the farmer out, but reality they are simply being greedy (on most accounts not all) and really hurting the sport in the long run.

leasers flame away.
 

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First Rule is do not give up. If you keep getting turned down from area farmers, expand your area. I hear the lapeer area has a lot of farmers who allow other to hunt their land, the same is true for durand guys as well.

Its a little tougher this year, there are less wheat fields for guys to get so it makes it tougher on the hunter. Trick is just presenting yourself nicely, being polite and go from there. I wouldnt go to the houses between 5-6 as this is most of their dinner times, but if thats all you have available then go for it.

Check list

Plat map
Full tank of gas
Dressed properly
Manners
And should you choose a little thank you gift for the farmer

If he says no, maybe you could ask him if he knows anyone who might allow you to hunt, Those farmers are usually a tight group of guys, esp if they are all close to each other, They know whats going on, they have been asked the same questions before.
 
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