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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This spring I decided I was going to really concentrate on trout fishing this summer. Well I haven't had the time I'd like but I have managed my biggest brown and rainbow. I also got my first trout on a dry fly. Up until this point I've been throwing elk hair caddis and just some other general drys along with a handful of streamers. So now I want to do some nymph fishing. I've tried with some pheasant tail nymphs and etc. but I just cant seem to get the hang of casting them with a strike indicator on them and etc. I've heard of using dry's for indicators so how do I rig a setup like that. Also how can I tell if my nymph is deep enough. Some of the holes I wanna fish them in I cannot see the bottom to judge depth. Also if anyone has any other tips or any general nymphs I should be tying up for when I head back up to school in the U.P my ears are open.
Thanks
Undertow
 

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A very general rule is to set your dropper 1-1/2 times the depth of water you plan on nymphing. Water speed will vary that distance... shorter for slower water, longer for faster.
If you're not hanging up on the bottom every so often you probably aren't deep enough.
You can tie the dropper to the hook bend or eye of your large, bushy dry fly.
Nymping and tossing junk is no time for tight loops and quick stops in your casting. Think 'casting in ovals', Belgian cast... low on the back cast and more overhead on the forward cast all the time concentrating on not shocking the rig with a crisp stop.
One more hint... generally if your indicator is moving upstream something bit! ;)
 

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As a general rule (but a real good starting point), if you aren't "ticking" bottom 3, 4 or 5 times on each nymph drift, you aren't deep enough. Use enough split shot on your line (or on a dropper) to help drag your nymphs down. The weight is what actually "ticks" the bottom. I like unweighted nymphs, they seem to produce best for me (but not always).

With indicator, weight and flies, casting is not really casting. Use a "lob" cast instead. Let your fly line and terminal rig extend downstream, then lob your cast up and across stream. Make one mend in mid air (or as soon as your splitshot hits the water . . . then a second mend to throw your fly line upstream a bit. Try to get your flies to drift downstream BEFORE your indicator does. Raise your rod tip as high as possible to get the fly line off the water (without moving the indicator), then point your rod tip at the indicator as it moves downstream, lowering your rod tip to increase the length of your "drag free" drift.

There are many other techniques, but the system I just described is probably considered the starting point . . . and it's good for small trout up to steelhead. Or course, you have to be aware of many different factors, such as distance between flies, or flies to split shot, length of leader, how far indicator is to split shot, leader diameters, etc. . . . but this is just a blog entry, not a whole book. Good luck.
 

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Good points. Remember, during a trout's lifecycle it feeds 90% of the time under the surface and the other 10% on the surface. Sure it is great to see a fish come up and eat a dry but if you want to catch fish on a consistent basis, anywhere in the world you need to learn to fish nymphs.

Put away the dry and run a double (or triple where allowed) nymph rig. Fish dries when the fish are obviously eating on the surface. A good general rule is you want your end fly 1 1/2 times the depth from your bobber. This, of course, depends on current speed, weight, varying depths, etc.. You want those flies to tick the bottom (as stated above). Remember, the current speed at the surface is far greater than it is underneath.

Mend, mend and more mends.

The best way to cast it is with a roll cast or some type of a glorified roll cast (like some of your spey movements).

Change your flies readily. Great nymphs are pheasant tails, hare's ears, copper John's, hetero-genius nymphs, tellico's, sili skin caddis, Polish nymphs, Czech nymphs, Edward's Hydrosychidae larvae, eggi juan kenobi, San Juan worms, prince nymphs, fuzz busters, and don't forget scuds (scuds are everywhere, all year because they don't hatch and fly away).

Good luck and hold on to your rod. Next will be streamers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks alot guys, I was not giving my nymph enough line among the many things I was doing wrong. I really appreciate the advice and I think all I need now is time on the water. Hopefully I will be able to get some hang of it before I head up to school in a month.
Thanks again
Undertow
 
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