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First of all, I have an extremely well behaved 16 week old Jack Russell. (He is actually already housebroken) We have had him for about 4 weeks now. Now that he is getting used to his surroundings, I have started noticing this wierd "birdy?" behavior. When I take him out back to do his business, he will finish and start to explore the yard. Now it gets strange. He starts sniffing into the breeze and will suddenly "lock up on point." We have tons of squirrels, moles, and birds around our place. When he locks up I am not able to get him to come. I can walk up to him and he will look at me without moving his head and give me this "What the heck am I smelling?" look. Then he just takes off like a Jack outta hell, running circles around the yard until he smells it again and does the same thing. Is he actually pointing, or is he just a pup that cant figure out what he is smelling?

Sorry about the long explanation. My second question is shorter.

He is being crated when we are at work. The wife and I take turns coming home for lunch to let him out and play with him for a while. My question for any of you JR owners is: How long should I wait until I start leaving his crate open when I leave? Let me know if I need to include any other information to properly answer this question.

Thanks
 

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bulltrout, I really don't have any answer for you, as far as, the pointing thing goes. But, the second part about crating the dog during the day. A lot depends on the dog. Normally, I don't trust a dog out of his (or her) crate all day, till they are at least a year and a half old. It's not just the "house training" thing you have to worry about. Made the mistake of letting our female ES stay out one day and she chewed up the leg on our antique log chair(which we recieved on our wedding day, from her family). It's the "teething" and "puppy boredom", that can make your life he**. So, be careful. Not to rush into letting your dog occupy it's day by itself. Nothing wrong with him staying in his crate for a few hours, while he's learning the ropes and maturing. Just make sure he gets enough exercise and training(this being most important) when you get home. To make up for the time spent in the crate. Good-luck with your new puppy. Brian.
 

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twosetters said:
bulltrout, I really don't have any answer for you, as far as, the pointing thing goes. But, the second part about crating the dog during the day. A lot depends on the dog. Normally, I don't trust a dog out of his (or her) crate all day, till they are at least a year and a half old. It's not just the "house training" thing you have to worry about. Made the mistake of letting our female ES stay out one day and she chewed up the leg on our antique log chair(which we recieved on our wedding day, from her family). It's the "teething" and "puppy boredom", that can make your life he**. So, be careful. Not to rush into letting your dog occupy it's day by itself. Nothing wrong with him staying in his crate for a few hours, while he's learning the ropes and maturing. Just make sure he gets enough exercise and training(this being most important) when you get home. To make up for the time spent in the crate. Good-luck with your new puppy. Brian.
:yeahthat:

I've seen Parson Terriers (Jack Russels) a few times now used as flushing dogs for pheasants and bunnies... They are hunting dogs... just not many are given the chance to hunt. I'm sure many of you PDJ guys remember reading about the Parson terrier that participated in the chain gang and became a nice little pointing dog (and bird flusher).
 

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From the AKC web site:

The Parson Russell Terrier was developed in the south of England in the 1800’s as a white terrier to work European red fox both above and below ground. The terrier was named for the Reverend John Russell, whose terriers trailed hounds and bolted foxes from dens so the hunt could ride on.

The Parson Russell - like most terriers - have a strong prey drive and a decent nose. I did see an interesting show on OLN featuring the flushing Parson Russell that Fieldwalker mentioned. The big dogs did the pointing and the little guy would bust in and flush the pheasants.
 

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there is a Wildlife Bio that works for the Tribe up here and is a member at our gun club. His dog is a JR and he bird hunts a lot. I believe Dave Duffy trained one to point....If you are interested in training him to be a bird dog, I suggest you purchase a spaniel training book and follow it.

Fritz
 

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We had a Rat Terrier when I was a kid. A JRT we got when the wife and I were first married. And now have a Treeing Feist terrier type squirrel dog. All were/are a scent/search/flush/roust-em-up type of dog. My dad did some pheasant hunting with the Rat Terrier. I pheasant hunted with our JRT. My Feist will roust & flush grouse.
I think that the pointing type of behavior is just a young dog smelling game, doesn't know what it is yet, & out of instinct just freezes. The day will come when your pup will get a scent and just charge right in.
It sounds as if that pup is ready to get out and roust some pheasants & rabbits.
 

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For the in the crate out of crate thing I agree with above. It takes a dog time to mature and grow out of chewing things. When you leave the dog feels neglected and a lot of times chewing things up is a way to get back at you for it. You have to start leaving him for short periods of time and take it step by step until he can be trusted for a whole day. For me my dog was about a year and a half before I could really trust him.
Ric
 

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my son and daughter in law just acquired a 5 yr old female. she's a sharp little dog. i had her sight pointing a wing yesterday. a great many dogs will "point", it's just an arrested stalk. the instinct is just developed to much higher degree in some dogs through selective breeding such as pointers and setters.
 
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