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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In two weeks form saturday i will be going on my first pheasant hunt (college graduation present). does anyone have any recommendations on clothing/gear required for a december pheasant hunt. i have lots of warm weather clothing from deer/squirrel hunting. and i also have orange hats and vests. i'm just not sure how warm of clothes i will actually need; from what I've read i'll be walking the entire time, as opposed to sitting as still as possible. Would base layer under jeans and jacket be warm enough or should i wear my cold weather bibs and thick jacket? would i want to take my light weight boots instead of the all leather extra warm boots?

thanks

DC
 

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Lol it's so hard to say because I don't know the weather in 2 weeks. I suggest finding a day that is slightly colder that today and try it out. Put all of your gear on and walk around the block. If you're warm then you might have to remove a layer, if you kind of cold then you will probably be set for walking up and down the field. Just remember that you can always remove layers. Another thing is that you want to make sure that you're gloves aren't too thick to the point where the trigger guard is interfering.
 

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DC,
I was out training yesterday afternoon for an hour or so. Temps were low 20's, wind was 15-20mph and had 5-7" of snow on the ground and the grass was tall and where the snow was sitting on the grass it was well over knee deep. I wore my thin merino wool longies with a sweatshirt and thin fleece on top and jeans on bottom. Boots were leather insulted, and thin leather shooting gloves. Also had my Stormy Krommer on.

If it had been no snow and 30 degrees I would have not wore the longie bottoms, insulted boots, Krommer, and fleece jacket, but would have worn my uninsulated boots, maybe a fleece vest if windy and a regular ball cap. Take a coat and bibs along in the car to put on if you stand around after the hunt or during a lunch break, but I stay pretty warm as long as I'm moving.

Enjoy your hunt and hope you catch the upland bug!
 

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The day of the event, dress so you are actually cool when you exit the truck, if you get out and you're warm...you'll be overdressed and will become hot and sweaty in no time. You want to start out feeling slightly chilled.

Dress in three layers, good wicking undershirt, semi-heavy outer shirt and your hunting coat (I prefer a non-lined coat). If the temps are in the twenties, me, I'd switch out the coat for a vest. As far as gloves go, I've only wore them a couple times and missed anchoring a nice rooster a few weeks ago because of them...so, me, I'd rather have cold fingers and kill a rooster, than warm fingers and miss on account of a snagged glove between triggers. Now, if it's terribly cold, gloves may have to be used, but I'd still only wear one on the forearm hand and keep my other hand in a pocket. Roosters flush slow and there's normally plenty of time to get ready.

Good luck, and we'll be looking for your old deer hunting gear on ebay..since your next post will be..."Where can I find a good breeder for a bird dog".

Brian.
 

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The day of the event, dress so you are actually cool when you exit the truck, if you get out and you're warm...you'll be overdressed and will become hot and sweaty in no time. You want to start out feeling slightly chilled.

Dress in three layers, good wicking undershirt, semi-heavy outer shirt and your hunting coat (I prefer a non-lined coat). If the temps are in the twenties, me, I'd switch out the coat for a vest. As far as gloves go, I've only wore them a couple times and missed anchoring a nice rooster a few weeks ago because of them...so, me, I'd rather have cold fingers and kill a rooster, than warm fingers and miss on account of a snagged glove between triggers. Now, if it's terribly cold, gloves may have to be used, but I'd still only wear one on the forearm hand and keep my other hand in a pocket. Roosters flush slow and there's normally plenty of time to get ready.

Good luck, and we'll be looking for your old deer hunting gear on ebay..since your next post will be..."Where can I find a good breeder for a bird dog".

Brian.
I would agree you want to be chilly when you exit the truck. A few layers is good cause you can add or remove one easily based on conditions and how you feel.

I would recommend a good pair of gloves that are thin and allow you to still have good dexterity in your fingers. I wear gloves all summer to shoot and all of the hunting season. They protect you from the weather as well as other hazards like the cover and birds when hunting. Just find a pair that fit you well and tight and you won't have any issues (I wear batting gloves)

Good luck!



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The day of the event, dress so you are actually cool when you exit the truck, if you get out and you're warm...you'll be overdressed and will become hot and sweaty in no time. You want to start out feeling slightly chilled.

Dress in three layers, good wicking undershirt, semi-heavy outer shirt and your hunting coat (I prefer a non-lined coat). If the temps are in the twenties, me, I'd switch out the coat for a vest. As far as gloves go, I've only wore them a couple times and missed anchoring a nice rooster a few weeks ago because of them...so, me, I'd rather have cold fingers and kill a rooster, than warm fingers and miss on account of a snagged glove between triggers. Now, if it's terribly cold, gloves may have to be used, but I'd still only wear one on the forearm hand and keep my other hand in a pocket. Roosters flush slow and there's normally plenty of time to get ready.

Good luck, and we'll be looking for your old deer hunting gear on ebay..since your next post will be..."Where can I find a good breeder for a bird dog".

Brian.
I agree with this guy, I don't know who he is but it sounds like he has a lot of experience.
 

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The day of the event, dress so you are actually cool when you exit the truck, if you get out and you're warm...you'll be overdressed and will become hot and sweaty in no time. You want to start out feeling slightly chilled.

Dress in three layers, good wicking undershirt, semi-heavy outer shirt and your hunting coat (I prefer a non-lined coat). If the temps are in the twenties, me, I'd switch out the coat for a vest. As far as gloves go, I've only wore them a couple times and missed anchoring a nice rooster a few weeks ago because of them...so, me, I'd rather have cold fingers and kill a rooster, than warm fingers and miss on account of a snagged glove between triggers. Now, if it's terribly cold, gloves may have to be used, but I'd still only wear one on the forearm hand and keep my other hand in a pocket. Roosters flush slow and there's normally plenty of time to get ready.

Good luck, and we'll be looking for your old deer hunting gear on ebay..since your next post will be..."Where can I find a good breeder for a bird dog".

Brian.
I did not think the Duke would wear gloves
 

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Yup, just layer for comfort. I am anti glove as long as possible. My hands aren't pretty, so I don't care if they get cut up. When it gets below frigid I roll with a pair of rag wool fingerless gloves with a mitten flap. They are the only thing I have found that keep my hands warm in extreme cold and allow my fingers to function.

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yup, just layer for comfort. I am anti glove as long as possible. My hands aren't pretty, so I don't care if they get cut up. When it gets below frigid I roll with a pair of rag wool fingerless gloves with a mitten flap. They are the only thing I have found that keep my hands warm in extreme cold and allow my fingers to function.

View attachment 51275

I have always used those for squirrel and coyote hunting; never had a problem shooting with them.


thanks for all the advice everyone
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
so i and my first pheasant hunt today, and you guys were right. It was awesome, so much more fun than deer hunting. i may have found a new hobby for life. I had the chance to shoot the first bird that was flushed. i lost it once it came up. i completely stopped looking down the barrel and just watched it fly, by the time i got the gun lined up with the bird, it was too late. i went on to get 4, birds so i felt i had a good day.
 

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so i and my first pheasant hunt today, and you guys were right. It was awesome, so much more fun than deer hunting. i may have found a new hobby for life. I had the chance to shoot the first bird that was flushed. i lost it once it came up. i completely stopped looking down the barrel and just watched it fly, by the time i got the gun lined up with the bird, it was too late. i went on to get 4, birds so i felt i had a good day.
Congrats. And yep pheasant hunting is very addicting. The thing I love about it is how every bird and every shot is unique. Sometimes the bird will flush from 10 yards out and sometimes you have to run full speed and kick him (ok that only happened once, but still) :lol:
 
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