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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Cleared a section of my property next to my house this spring to plant a human food plot but the soil test came back at under 4.8, so I added a bunch of lime and planted buckwheat as a cover crop. As you can see in the pictures there are spots in the plot that have significantly less growth. This area had a few larger cherries and maples but mostly sassafras, small cherries and some autumn olive. I'm wondering if these bare spots are where the larger trees stood and their root structure is interfering with the grow of the buckwheat? You can see the closeup of the wood chips left behind after the grubbing of the trees and a few passes with the tiller.






If it's the root remnants will this clear by next spring? Is something else the cause? I didn't fertilize before planting the buckwheat.
 

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From the picture, it looks like the layer of sticks and mulch was just too thick, so it didn't allow seed to make contact with the soil. My guess is it will stay that way until you clear it out. A few minutes with a steel rake should do the trick?
 

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Are those low spots and too much water hurt the plants ?

L & O
 

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It doesn't look like a mulch issue. L&O may be right since it is hard to tell low spots from pictures. The best way to understand what you see above ground is understand what is going on underground. Take a shovel and dig down about a foot and see if roots, drainage or possibly an obstruction is causing grief. Had a problem several years ago with grass growing on an university property. Took a backhoe and dug down 4 ft to find an old foundation that was affecting the drainage.

The rest of the buckwheat looks great. there is a basic reason why those spots aren't taking up nutrients.

Tim
 

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The third picture appears to show a slope that should be well-drained, but virtually no germination. The fourth picture, with a lot of sticks and other detritus, is the one that looks like maybe there was too much stuff on the surface for the seeds to make contact with the soil. Maybe there is more going on here than meets the eye? The yellowing of plants around the bare spots DOES suggest too much moisture.
 

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like everyone else is stating,it just may be to much moisture.but,just in case,take another soil sample just from those areas and have them checked.some trees that have been removed will still leave the soil on the acidic side for awhile and more lime needs to be added over a period of time.this is really noticable when removing walnuts.also the type of soil that may have been turned up when clearing may be lacking the proper nutrition.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks guys. Being in SW Michigan we have a bunch of sand under our topsoil. Drainage isn't an issue. However we did get a couple significant rains after planting around germination time if I remember right? I will do some digging as Anderson suggested and see what lies below these spots. I also will reseed these areas to see what the result is.

Broom, there is quite a bit of "mulch" across this plot, however these areas are the worst - could be a factor.
 
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