Michigan Sportsman Forum banner
21 - 40 of 47 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,743 Posts
Any reason you are set on the .270? There are other calibers that will do the same thing with less recoil and blast. 6.5 creedmoor or .260 come to mind. Or 7/08 like mentioned above.
And practically every rifle has a 6.5 creed chambering these days, so you have great options to choose from
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,050 Posts
My oldest daughter is short, about 5 foot 1 and and a skosh.

When we went shopping for a rifle for her we went to Jay's in Clare.

The salesperson was very helpful, patient and even funny at times.
After a few minutes he and she were insulting each other like old friends.

After trying on a number of rifles she settled on a Savage youth model
in .243. Fit her perfectly but came in the Muddy Girl camo pattern. She
told the sales guy "I don't do pink."

He looked at her a minute and then said "Would you like it better if I
knocked 50 bucks off and threw in a box of ammo?"

She decided she could live with it.

After hunting with it a couple years, she loves it, and she had a great
time shopping for it (so did I).

She got a good basic rifle in a great caliber that fits her perfectly and
came at a great price. It will probably last her the rest of her life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
I went thru this same excersize a few years ago for my wife. She is the same size as your daughter. I was set on the .270. Always liked the caliber. We ended up going with a Browning in 243, the xbolt midas model, sized for children and small woman. Besides the bullet being cheap and easy to find the big kicker was the shorter throw on the bolt. She felt she could work ths bolt and shorter case much smoother. Shorter arms on a long case makes a difference.

Reeds sporting goods is a large Browning dealer and will ship anywhere. Good to deal with and prices.

Lot of good advice on calibers in this thread, you cant go wrong with any.

Forgot to mention, shorter stock is a must. Wife shoots a 20 guage shotgun. Replaced stock with shorter one and made all the difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Thanks everyone for responding. After doing more research and taking your comments into consideration, I’ve pretty much narrowed it down to a 243. Been looking at the single shot’s from either CVA or Tradition’s. Does anyone have experience with either of these models and/or brands? Seems like the the muzzle loader’s are very similar compared to the single shot models; especially the CVA Wolf.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
So many great choices: .308 for variety of bullet weight ( 110 gr to 180 gr ) versatile with ammo avail everywhere. 7mm-08, 243, 44 mag, or 350 legend. Henry makes a beautiful single shot with walnut/ blue barrel and improved trigger. I have a cva 44 mag single shot. Stainless and syn stock with a nice trigger. Very accurate at medium distance & light recoil. If you are like me, you will eventually own several from this list! Best of all, if your first choice does not work out you will have no problems selling at a decent price and try another caliber. I've sold several guns the past 3 yrs and they were gone in 24-48 hrs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,581 Posts
My wife owns several shotguns in both 20 gauge and 12 gauge. She also owns a 30:06, .270, 6.5 Creedmore, .204 Ruger and .17 HMR. All of them are Brownings except for the 30:06 which is a Tikka. She killed her first deer with a shotgun many years ago but her go to for most everything is her Browning A-Bolt in .270. She has killed black bears, antelope, mule deer and many, many whitetails with it and she has never needed a second shot.

She shoots 1 hole groups with it with inexpensive factory ammo which is widely available. In fact she probably already has a lifetime supply of her favorite - 130 grain Winchester Deer Season XP.

A close second would be the Browning X-Bolt in 6.5 Creedmore which has even less recoil - especially since it comes with a muzzle brake. It has a real sweet trigger and she shoots 1-hole groups with it also but it is fairly new to her and she has only killed one whitetail with it so far (she can't bear to leave her .270 in the gun safe when hunting season gets here).

It is no fun shooting rifled slugs or buckshot from a shotgun. Simply way too much recoil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
332 Posts
It really depends on a rifle, and keep in mind that a young lady's frame won't absorb recoil like a middle-aged man.

A lot of the youth/women rifles are pretty light. I have a lightweight .270 that bucks pretty hard and blast is intense. I'd imagine it would be especially uncomfortable to shoot if I weighed 80 lbs less, too.

Better options: .243, 6.5 Creed, 7-08. All have a shorter bolt throw, too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,328 Posts
It really depends on a rifle, and keep in mind that a young lady's frame won't absorb recoil like a middle-aged man.

A lot of the youth/women rifles are pretty light. I have a lightweight .270 that bucks pretty hard and blast is intense. I'd imagine it would be especially uncomfortable to shoot if I weighed 80 lbs less, too.

Better options: .243, 6.5 Creed, 7-08. All have a shorter bolt throw, too.
A lot of that is just acclimation. I feel the recoil much more when shooting left-handed instead of my usual right-handed. Same thing happens with pistols also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
641 Posts
It really depends on a rifle, and keep in mind that a young lady's frame won't absorb recoil like a middle-aged man.

A lot of the youth/women rifles are pretty light. I have a lightweight .270 that bucks pretty hard and blast is intense. I'd imagine it would be especially uncomfortable to shoot if I weighed 80 lbs less, too.

Better options: .243, 6.5 Creed, 7-08. All have a shorter bolt throw, too.
Heavier person will actually feel more recoil than lighter. The lighter person just gets knocked back further so the heavier weight can reset aim quicker but they will always feel more recoil. The lighter weight person has to watch out for scope bite.
 
21 - 40 of 47 Posts
Top