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I wanted to add a post about a chainsaw cut to the face to this thread...warning...it's graphic but it get's the point across to be safe out there.

Chainsaw massacre

I ordered this helmet with face protection but it may not be worth a flip?

Peltor Lumberjack Series Hardhat

If you have a favorite that works well for you please post it up so we can avoid accidents like that post this winter.

Habitat modification is great, I think all Paul is saying is that some deer cam pics would validate some of the claims that are made about what the modifications will accomplish. No reason to get upset about that.

Perfect!

I should point out why some people have such interest in executing down to specific details to increase their odds

Yes...I understand and completely respect that!! The part that I feel you (or anyone) is missing is that during the rut when that buck is most vulnerable...he isn't going to be sleeping period...let alone in a bed you built him.

That's the whole problem with this....the beds become useless when bucks start moving so it troubles me that some of you have been lead to believe that a bed is going to help you kill a buck?

Friends...I do not want to disrespect you as individuals and if you feel that "bed building" is in your best interest then by all means...do so. That being said however I would strongly encourage you to really study whitetail behavior during the rut and then decide if a "bed" will really be in your best interests.

This is yet another reason why trail cams are very helpful because they will verify every word that I am telling you. Beyond that I will try to avoid that subject because too much time is wasted and our posts then are not productive and helpful.

OSXer..I do very much appreciate your respectful way of sharing your personal reasons and desire to pursue what you feel is a beneficial tactic.

Munsterlndr...thanks for sharing the great pics and thoughts :cool:
 

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Paul,
Just have to say you explain things very clearly and you have fantastic photographic evidence to back it up.. It sure is nice reading your posts and learning from you. If some cannot realize your sharing this valuable information out of the goodness of your heart, without hopes of financial gain, it's their loss.
your an asset to this forum!
thank you for sharing!
 

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Yes...I understand and completely respect that!! The part that I feel you (or anyone) is missing is that during the rut when that buck is most vulnerable...he isn't going to be sleeping period...let alone in a bed you built him.

That's the whole problem with this....the beds become useless when bucks start moving so it troubles me that some of you have been lead to believe that a bed is going to help you kill a buck?

Friends...I do not want to disrespect you as individuals and if you feel that "bed building" is in your best interest then by all means...do so. That being said however I would strongly encourage you to really study whitetail behavior during the rut and then decide if a "bed" will really be in your best interests.
Dbltree,

I don't think people are missing the point about the rut. I think given the buck behavior during the rut, why wouldn't you want to make specific beds so that you can kill the buck during the pre-rut, or prior, thus eliminating the effects of the hot doe taking the buck that has been living on your property all year away?

A bed will not help you kill a buck during the rut, but it will definitely not hurt you during the pre-rut, where you know where the buck will be bedding and feeding.

Someone once said that "the rut is a crapshoot - it is for those that don't understand deer behavior." I tend to agree with that, it is a crapshoot, especially on small properties. I would like to set up specific buck bedding areas and doe bedding areas that Northjeff talks about.

What is your experience of buck behavior prior to the rut?
 

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I think that it's really just different strokes for different folks. ;)

Paul, you've mentioned before that properties in the vicinity of yours hold mature deer in park-like woods while the owners do no improvements. They are able to do this because they have hundreds of acres of woods.

You have less, so you feel the need to do improvements that will encourage deer to use your property such as you've suggested in this thread and many others. You do not have time to rake beds, ect, so you set aside larger areas you've cut and let the deer sort it out for themselves.

... I, for example, have far, far less. If I wanted I could fell every tree on my property within a weekend by myself. This is where people's interest in building "beds", AKA specific locations comes to greater interest. I have limited acreage I can do changes to, so I prefer to focus on the finer details because I don't have space to waste or let the deer figure it out for themselves. I also live on location, so it's perhaps easier for me to get to take care of finer details than you are able to, raking for example.

Now, if I had an 80 or a 160 acre parcel, I'd probably not focus on the details as much because I wouldn't have the time! But on a broader landscape you can get away with more, such as your neighbors with hundreds of acres of mature forest with mature bucks. Does focusing on the finer details guarantee success - heck no! I do however feel that it increases the odds!

Now I'm not in the TL fan club, but thought I should point out why some people have such interest in executing down to specific details to increase their odds verses those who have a much larger canvas to work with. ;) :)
I happen to be in the same area of OSXer and think this post is right on target. Our properties are in suburban areas that have extremely pressured whitetails. Less than 40 acres in Michigan is tremendously different than 160 acres in Iowa. We have to micromanage our properties in order to have a reasonable semblance of a hunting experienced that we see posted in the Whitetail Deer Hunting forum here.

When the subject of micromanaging 50 acres or less in Michigan for bowhunting comes up, there is no better resource to go to than Tony Lapratt. The idea of his ultimate buck bed being bandied about on MSF is really quite humorous over the last couple years. He literally devotes about 5 minutes to it in his bootcamp--I kid you not. The other 149 key factors he teaches in micromanaging are just as important. His bootcamp is a comprehensive plan for the small land owner who bowhunts to improve his habitat with cover, water, food, travel lanes for bucks, welcome areas for does year round and techniques for increasing the density of deer on a small property.

What Dbltree does on 160 acres, he tries to do on 50. If I were to translate all the knowledge that can be gleaned from Dbltrees posts and discuss how to do it on small acreage I would have a mirror of Tony Lapratt's teaching. It's the same stuff just tweaked for the small property--with a few other dozen or so observations he's made from an extraordinary amount of time spent on stand.


And his success is spectacular. It's not gimmicky or a fluke. It's the same stuff that I see on Dbltrees fantastic threads, just on a smaller scale. I have no doubt that Dbletree or Alpha Doe on QDMA forums don't need the micromanaging that we do in small heavily populated areas of Michigan. It is successful here and I have no doubt would be a royal pain in the ass in Iowa on 160 acres.


Yes...I understand and completely respect that!! The part that I feel you (or anyone) is missing is that during the rut when that buck is most vulnerable...he isn't going to be sleeping period...let alone in a bed you built him.

That's the whole problem with this....the beds become useless when bucks start moving so it troubles me that some of you have been lead to believe that a bed is going to help you kill a buck?

Friends...I do not want to disrespect you as individuals and if you feel that "bed building" is in your best interest then by all means...do so. That being said however I would strongly encourage you to really study whitetail behavior during the rut and then decide if a "bed" will really be in your best interests.

OSXer..I do very much appreciate your respectful way of sharing your personal reasons and desire to pursue what you feel is a beneficial tactic.
Stipulating that bedding areas are only one small part of the comprehensive plan of wildlife habitat improvement for whitetails, the absolute rut is not the only hunting opportunity. We still have seeking, chasing and the rut. A valid tactic is to set up on a trail where a buck is returning to his bed at dawn. At this time as he travels to his bedding area, he is vulnerable to a bow hunter. A bedding area for bucks is not as useless as you describe. Northjeff and Tony Lapratt employ this tactic with fine results--i.e. morning hunting along a trail to a known bedding area.

Any one in our situation--Michigan small property hunters--and especially those who have attended Bootcamp are indeed highly offended, despite your protestations that you don't mean to disrespect us as individuals subscribing to the micromanaging of small properties. I've seen your recent aerial of yours and your neighbor's property in a Lay of the Land thread. These properties you guys have are fantastic! Unbelievably great whitetail habitat. And your improvements are nothing short of fantastic. We have a lot of great things going in Michigan, but managing the whitetail population with a balanced population or distribution is certainly not one of them.

This thread and all of your others Paul are a fantastic resource for learning habitat improvement. Please keep them coming as you have. But please stop the disrespect for another way of thought that some have found valuable. I respect you a lot. I disagree with you a little.

Many of QDMA's most vocal and fund raising supporters including Ed Spinazolla, Tony Lapratt, QDMAMAN and BIOACTIVE have shown the most impressive results of micromanaging whitetail habitat in Michigan.

And back to the topic of natural forage and cover. Hinge cutting techniques for whitetail deer habitat are one subject that I have found are impossible to google search for and find valuable information. Proper, innovative and different techniques of hinge-cutting are a valuable discussion in this thread.
 

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Excellent response StevenJ.
If I had a "large" tract of land things would not be as critical as to try to build 'individual' beds. On "10" acres it is a little different.
And to confirm, Tony's tactics are for the end of October and beginning of November before the "chase" period begins. Not that everything he teaches you won't improve your hunting 100 fold, but he understands when your best opportunity to get a mature buck is, and it is before he becomes "unpredictible". Thanks again, to all who contribute to these theads. Let's keep cool heads, and have fun.:)
 

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These are all valid whitetail habitat subjects, and should be open for discussion, however there should be very little tolerance when these debates become personal. This includes snide, rude and condescending remarks.

I would suggest that some of Paul's threads be broken up into new threads, or that he blog the didactic portions of his threads. The stuff he is posting is just too important as a primer for habitat improvements to have posts like the previous. It's not a popularity contest it's a habitat forum.

It is evident that Michigan Sportsman's forum is big and having trouble handling some of the longer posts, so Steve the Administrator must be working furiously to find more server power and bandwith (which I'm sure he has to pay more for).
See here:http://www.michigan-sportsman.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=22

Currently many features (such as multiple quotes, clicking on new posts has now limited the number of pages viewed, etc.) are being disabled to conserve resources.


"Every time a thread is viewed, a lot of information has to be called from the database, both to build the page you are looking at and the 'Next'/'Previous' page links. The bigger a thread gets, the more information that has to be accessed to build the pages. After a certain point, which is dependent on how busy a site is and how powerful the server hosting the site is, a single page building process can take so much time that it backs up other processes. If this is allowed to continue unchecked, the resource-hog processes can crash the MySQL server or even the whole box."
 

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I would like to see the thread get back on point too. This is not a TL thread and I see no reason for it to become a debate on that subject.

I think I was addressing a valid point when I discussed alternative methods of assessing whether a "funnel" is being used. Much has been made about it so it seems to be a valid area to address. To do so, I used mainly a 20 hour snapshot of a period of use of a funnel in which I was able to follow tracks from bedding areas, past the funnel and to the food sources. I found what are unmistakably buck beds and tracks in the bedding area, and virtually all the tracks from the beds leading through one of two funnels out of the bedding area. I found no evidence of bedding in open canopied, non-hinge cut areas adjacent to the new hinge cuts (identical areas prior to the hinge cuts), so can infer from that information that the hinge cutting created good bedding habitat. In my opinion, this offers an important means for a hunter to determine whether deer "like the habitat" produced. I struggle (I am trying) to see how a picture of a buck taken with a trail camera has more value than a picture of a buck from a camera held in my hands, or a snapshot in time as seen with a fresh snow. I think that both of these approaches have value, and I never said trail cameras are not useful, they are. What I am trying to do is to simply convey to hunters that you can assess the use of your funnels without the use of trail cameras. If you use them, great, but I personally feel the results of the kind of scouting I did, where I follow the trail all the way from the bed to the food, is a more compelling approach, and more complete picture of what the deer was doing. I was even able to observe the browsing of the deer along the path as evidenced by them scraping the fresh snow as they walked through the bedding areas and left fresh pieces of green plants on the ground.


The part that I feel you (or anyone) is missing is that during the rut when that buck is most vulnerable...he isn't going to be sleeping period...let alone in a bed you built him.

That's the whole problem with this....the beds become useless when bucks start moving so it troubles me that some of you have been lead to believe that a bed is going to help you kill a buck?
To agree with Paul's point here, On November 23rd I looked across the road towards my mother-in-laws CRP field and saw a buck standing by my mailbox, about 15 yards into the field. Looked like a 2.5 year old. This is in the middle of our gun season and about 9 in the morning, and totally visible to every passing car. I saw him lay down so began to sneak across the road with my camera. I got to the other side of the road and saw that there was a doe he was tending. She was running back and forth, terrified of me, and he was like a sheep dog, blocking her from escape into the field. She finally got around him and they both disappeared into the high grasses. The point is, this buck is not going to be found in his bed during this time period (near the peak of the rut in MI). Many professional hunters say the height of the rut is the worst time to target big bucks and that mostly luck is involved in getting one at that time--for the reasons Paul points out. North Jeff has been pretty clear about that in the past.

Accepting the truth of Paul's statements, he and I are in a completely equal situation in my view. If a buck abandons the beds I make, he will abandon the ones you make as well (i.e. those locations that he chooses to lay down in among your hinge cuts). I fail to see how this is an argument against creating areas where deer want to bed. It applies to your sanctuary (bedding) areas as well as mine, doesn't it? What am I missing folks? During most of the hunting season in my state, the mature buck is hiding out in his prime bedding areas in day light. While the little guys are out chasing, he is hidden in very specific locations he likes, usually all day long--but very importantly, he gets up to move around at times, which is all that gives any of us hope outside the "crazy" times. What is wrong with optimizing these locations? It is only for a short period of a couple of weeks that mature bucks start to go crazy and do stuff in daytime that they wouldn't do otherwise--locking down on does in odd areas and the like. Because of that, are you saying that both you and I are wasting time by creating hinge cut areas where bucks will bed? I hope not.

There is something that may be misunderstood by some about this practice of "bed-building." The practice involves setting aside a sanctuary, and simply trying to make as many spots for a deer to bed as possible. One then hunts funnels and pinch points coming out of the sanctuary. It doesn't matter if a buck named Larry lays in bed 1, bed 2, bed 3, bed 4, etc., what matters is there are nice places for him to lay down, as many as possible, and that he come and goes through the funnels, past our stands. Paul teaches people how to make beds, North Jeff does, others do, I really only see differences in details, not whether it is a good idea to build bedding areas for deer and provide funnels for their entry and exit. I further see only minor differences regarding how to monitor the use of these funnels and bedding areas. some people rely more on trail cameras, others may believe trail cameras are a negative for mature deer and right or wrong, choose not to use them. others cannot afford a trail camera. I am simply (freely) suggesting alternative approaches.

The information I shared in the above posts about my late season approach to determining funnel use occurred during a time when bucks are on feeding, not breeding patterns. The same thing is true during October, when bucks are often still in bachelor groups, using traditional bedding areas, and are patternable.

During most of our season, the "rut" is not going on, and bucks are staying in their "home" spots where they feel safe. It is during these times that bucks are most predictable and may be patterned. What is wrong with creating as many neat spots for them to lay in on your small property as you possibly can? What can it hurt if one is willing to do the work?
 

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Discussion Starter · #228 ·
Cover

You can't have too much cover and regardless if you log, hinge or plant shrubs and conifers....creating thick brushy cover will in turn attract and hold large numbers of whitetails including mature bucks.

These are examples of naturally regenerated cover...



Deer pour out of this cover every evening



Brushy shrubby type cover allows them to lay down and see danger approaching



and then get up and flee withe cover between them and the pursuer



Brush also equals browse and natural browse takes the pressure off from planted food sources as well as keeping them fed through the difficult winter months. Think brush/cover/sanctuary and building better whitetail habitat with it today... :cool:
 

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Cover

You can't have too much cover and regardless if you log, hinge or plant shrubs and conifers....creating thick brushy cover will in turn attract and hold large numbers of whitetails including mature bucks.

Brushy shrubby type cover allows them to lay down and see danger approaching and then get up and flee withe cover between them and the pursuer

Brush also equals browse and natural browse takes the pressure off from planted food sources as well as keeping them fed through the difficult winter months. Think brush/cover/sanctuary and building better whitetail habitat with it today... :cool:
I could not agree more. I find this kind of cover is about as good as it gets, and my very best bedding areas consist of this dense, brushy cover. It provides great bedding. This shot is on 20 hour old snow. I saw about a dozen beds scattered around the area, but this was a long, large one with large tracks associated with it that appeared to be made by a buck.



This kind of cover also provides lots of fun rubbing trees. There are countless numbers of fresh ones to be found in this area.





The area these pictures were taken in is shown by the large arrow:



The problem with this spot is there is a great tree just west of it for a stand (white dot), but deer would move out of it along the trail of their choice. So we created a no-go, or tornado zone between them and stand in the giant oak (arrow). This forces the deer to move north of the stand to get too and from this bedding area. It prevents them from walking directly towards the stand, thus diminishing the chance of getting caught moving. It is so thick in this bedding area it is hard to see into even with snow and it is easy to have a deer stand up or show up and catch you unawares.



They must move along this trail, where X marks the spot for a deer moving east to west, one moving west to east is in position a little more in the foreground.



Again, this is with 20 hour snow, just after the end of our late doe season. It clearly shows deer are using this bedding area and moving on a path we prescribe right past the stand. That this represents the very best bedding on the property is evidenced by the fact that we found 4 dead deer within that small area this spring. Deer typically go to their most protected places to die.

As has been said before, much has been made about bedding areas made by hinging. That approach is a necessary but unfortunate need associated with the condition of an open hardwoods that lacks an understory. By hinging it you can change it from a deer desert to deer bedding area in one year, but it still is not as good as these natural second growth areas. In fact, the reason to take out the canopy is to take that former deer desert and turn it into second growth.

More than half of the bedding areas on this property (see map) are natural. Little has to be done except to make sure they do not get overgrown so that deer can get into them and use them. When we acquired this property last spring, we quickly realized that the tamarack swamp in the SE corner was not being used by deer at all (historically it was one of the best bedding areas in the area until it got overgrown--we knew that because our family property borders it to the south). We went through with chainsaws and made trails into it in May of last year, but it was still too thick, and was used very little this year, and we need to do some more work on it this spring. This is an object lesson in how important it is to not just designate a safe area and leave it be. On the other hand, there was a huge amount of usage of the hinge cut area to the north and the natural area north and west of the hinge cut area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #230 ·
Timber Edge-feathering

Edge Feathering gained popularity many years ago as a means of enhancing small game habitat, especially for quail. It didn't take long for me to figure out it also made for great trail blocking and screening for whitetails!

These trees are often too big to hinge so larger trees I simple cut down and then swing them around with the tractor and loader.



It's easy to see how one can almost instantly block off runways along a field edge over a very long area if you have the cull trees to do so. In my area the combination of sunlight and protection of the tree tops causes the edge to explode with new growth. Blackberries, vines etc. all take advantage of this protected environment to grow and flourish and in doing so only add to the blocking effect while increasing browse along the edge.



Funneling deer out through one or two runways versus dozens makes for more effective trail cam surveys and increases successful encounters in hunting season! Edge Feathering is a win win for wildlife and hunters both! :)
 

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Bio, on average, how wide are your Tornado areas? I found one of my "tornado" areas still used by deer......obviously is was not thick nor wide enough.....
Width is not important. Like many, we make barriers that are very narrow that deer would choose to walk around rather than over. The no-go zones are cut low, medium, and high randomly enough (criss-crossing, putting tops down on the ground) so that there is no path they can take into it where they feel they can escape easily. Even if they might be able to penetrate it with a lot of work and effort, they do not feel they can quickly escape. That is at least my theory as to how these things work.

A key element of this is having nearby bedding areas that offer everything the deer needs. In the absence of our nearby bedding areas, deer would probably use the hinge cut areas near our stands or along the edge of the tornado zone, but since they have great alternatives, they don't use these areas.

Deer will use the best habitat available to them during times of pressure. If it is marginal, they will use the marginal areas. If there is a marginal area near a great area, they will seldom use the marginal area and use the great areas.
 

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;)

The most important part of a trail cam picture is the date and time stamp on the picture. It lets you know if that mature buck living on your property is a huntable buck.(not soley nocturnal) You are missing the boat not using trail cams. The example you give of the spooked deer is a very poorly placed trail cam. Put that camera 15 ft high angled down at the scent rag then show me the pictures. You had to walk into their bedroom to confirm deer were bedding there.(I'm sure you already knew) A few well placed trail cams put between their bedroom and feeding area would have told you how many, what kind and time of movement. Really a no brainer.
Poorly placed cam? You might want to look into what kind of camera this is, I have thousands of pictures of mature bucks with these cameras and this happens less then 1% of the time. 15 foot in the air is great for pictures of deer, but completely useless for aging them.
Back on topic, this has been a great thread with a lot of good information.
 

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Poorly placed cam? You might want to look into what kind of camera this is, I have thousands of pictures of mature bucks with these cameras and this happens less then 1% of the time. 15 foot in the air is great for pictures of deer, but completely useless for aging them.
Back on topic, this has been a great thread with a lot of good information.
I chose Calhoun's thread because he is well known as being on of the best in the state of Michigan at using trail cameras to follow bucks year to year, pattern them, and work in conjunction with his fellow co-op members to understand the movements of bucks in their territory. Nonetheless, even with his high degree of expertise, deer sometimes (rarely) bust the camera, and he is willing to share when that happens. I am sorry I subjected him to unfair criticism by using his thread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #237 ·
Blocking

Can you make an area too thick? You bet! That's why hinging can also work so well for trail blocking!

These pics are an example of a low area that deer crossed randomly across the entire length of it and I set out to prevent that and force them all to travel within 20 yards of a ground blind.



Where deer have the opportunity to bed on any ridge or even a rise they will do so and low areas that tend to be wet will seldom be used for that purpose anyway.



Deer will feed along and through low areas so it's a great place to create browse....note the re-growth sprouting off the stump in the right foreground



In this case I left the White Swamp Oaks standing and tipped over the shingle oak, ash and maple to make such a thick mess they simply don't go through it. Ridges tend to be less fertile soil so re-growth is often less robust and hinging can be more aggressive.

Regions where the whole area is low land are of course a different story as deer have little other choice in regards to bedding but one can expect more vigorous re-growth once canopy is removed. Depending on the type of trees and stage of growth sometimes small pockets left untouched may actually be preferred so each landowner may wish to experiment and note which habitat receives the most use.

In either event the use of hinged trees to block runways and create funnels is a tremendous tool that can greatly increase your hunting success and provide more effective trail cam surveys.... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #238 ·
Timber Stand Improvement

TSI should be one of the first steps in our timber and that requires that we enlist the help of a qualified forester who can then write up a Forest Stewardship Plan that can help us meet our goals of improving both our timber and our whitetail habitat. In many cases the forester may recommend that a select cut be done to remove market size logs and after that is done we can then begin TSI work.

TSI involves Crop Tree Release which involves removing competing canopy on all 4 sides of the crop tree which we select as being the best candidate to release just as we would do in thinning plants in a garden. Typically the cull trees are girdled and in some cases treated with Tordon RTU to prevent regrowth but often we can hinge cull trees to increase bedding cover and open up competing canopy at the same time.

Across the country landowners may have different species to deal with so it's imperative that you understand what tree species look like before attempting this (look at the second page for common species in the Midwest)

It's important to remember here that cost share is available through state and federal programs so often we can get paid to improve both our timber and our habitat....check the Getting Started thread for links on that subject.

I am currently working on TSI projects for hunter/landowners who desire to improve both timber and habitat and the following pictures are from a timber where logging has done first and we are following up with TSI and utilizing hinge cutting as a means of culling many of the cull trees. In this case ironwood is one of the worst weed trees with lessor amounts of ash, hickory and elm of varying sizes so i hinge everything from 1" to 8-10" in diameter and either girdle or hinge larger trees depending on how safe the situation is. Ground in SE Iowa tends to be very hilly and steep so in many cases it's simply to risky to attempt to hinge any larger trees.

This is a snow covered stump with oak re-growth coming up from the cut...logging opens up canopy which in turn encourages oak regeneration, cover and browse



This is just natural regeneration from acorns that now are able to survive with canopy reduced.



This pic just gives one an idea of the type of terrain...a watershed with a series of ridges and steep draws leading up or into the drainage and how the oak tops themselves immediately offer some cover and screening.



This an ironwood (I believe...the pocket camera pics are not the best and my eyes even worse) that I hinged...they are common and a very shade tolerant tree that foresters will encourage landowners to cut. It's a win win for both timber and deer when we tip them over.



These sized trees are easy and safe to hinge although the foresters usually prefer they be treated with Tordon after hinging.



I like to cut at least somewhat on an angle because if trees start to tip the wrong way, they will stop and rest again the angle and that allows me to simply push most of them over but each sawyer can choose the method they feel comfortable with.



These are pretty typical "hinges"





TSI work requires releasing the best crop tree so in some cases that means killing one or more red or white oaks and in doing so I find that red oaks rarely survive hinging, they are too brittle and even small trees tend to break off. White oaks however seem to hinge well and both send up an explosion of new sprouts from the cut stump so even though the tree may break off...all is not lost!

We also select trees with "problems"...signs of decay that indicate a rotten interior and those trees also are unlikely to survive hinging such as is the case with this red oak.

 

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Discussion Starter · #239 ·
I find hinging trees on an angle to be extremely safe and because I usually work alone I wouldn't do so if it were not. Regardless of how one does it however "stuff" happens as tree tops tangle and that can cause the tree to twist and turn and do something unexpected. For that reason I am careful to have an escape to step away from the tree as it starts to tip over...this tree is one such case as the top caught another and it twisted on the way down.



Others are relatively easy and as long as there is a sliver connecting the trunk to the stump...they will remain alive



This an area previously hinged by the landowner more to block the view of a neighboring hunter



Notice the difference in the open foreground and the brush coming up through the downed trees in the background



My pocket camera isn't the greatest but I'll continue to share pics from various TSI jobs this winter in hopes it may give others ideas and things to think about before working on your own projects... ;)
 

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My pocket camera isn't the greatest ...
The pictures look good enough to me! Thanks for sharing.

I must say that I envy those large trees you show cut that have large tops still offering structure. My woods is ~80%+ Ash and due to EAB, all of the bigger ones are 100% dead and have been for a few years now so they are well dried out. When I cut them, the tops simply shatter and there's nothing but a large trunk and some bigger branches for structure. :(

The next few years will be tough, but I'd rather get them down so they stop randomly falling on non-ash species regrowing from the forest floor or falling across trails during the corse of the fall (there's nothing like sitting in a stand for the first time, watching the deer coming down the planned path, only to see them turn back because of trees fallen across the trail blocking them.
 
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