Michigan Sportsman Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Say My Name.
Joined
·
14,731 Posts
dbltree, between 1996 and 2000 I planted over 100 hybrid oaks; they were all containterized seedlings, and I used tree tubes on all of them. I probably planted eight different varieties, can't think of all of them now, but burgambels were one, and several were crosses of bur, live, english, swamp white, white, etc.

Survival was poor. Only a handful of trees remain, and the survivors are almost all burenglish, which was, hands down, the hardiest variety I tried, and the only one which has to date produced acorns. I do have a couple surviving schuette's oaks (cross between q. macrocarpa and q. bicolor) and one scraggly burgamel. All in all, it hasn't been a successful endeavor. I should mention that I do not live on my farm, and could not provide TLC to these trees; planted them, performed initial weed control, put on the tree shelter at planting, and that was it.

I do have a ton of oaks growing on my farm, and I have found a tactic for growing them that just plain works with a 100% success rate. Find a wild growing oak (on my place, that means bur, swamp white, or northern red, in order of abundance), especially one that has sprouted up in an old field. whose growth has been inhibited by deer damage; prune it way back so there's just a central leader, then, fasten on a 4-foot tree tube, and get out of the way. The growth rate of that tree will astonish you, owing to the already-developed root system. I've got a couple trees I re-habbed this way that are now 5-6" dbh (one's girth literally busted the tube!) and 25 feet tall. Only thing is, you have to accept them where mother nature decided to plant 'em.
 

·
Say My Name.
Joined
·
14,731 Posts
70%-85% just sounds like way too much.

Depends on the species. It's one thing to pull over a basswood or a box elder or an elm or a red maple that's been cut 50-60% of the way through, and quite another on a species with strong and tough (two different properties) wood.

Trees like bitternut hickory, blue beech, ironwood and swamp white oak are another story. On those, unless you're talking about a very small diameter tree, you could cut 80% of the way through and still have a substantial chore on your hands.

I strongly recommend that interested land managers educate themselves on the fine points of tree identification. I have a number of tree books, and the best, in a cakewalk, IMO, is Barnes and Wagners' Michigan Trees - A Guide to the Trees of the Great Lakes Region, and best yet is the 2004 edition, 2008 printing.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top