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MUCCs Deer Policy

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MICHIGAN UNITED CONSERVATION CLUBS

DEER
Policies Related to Deer Management, Chronic Wasting Disease and CWD Response Plan Actions, Captive Cervids, and Habitat

In light of the Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) discoveries in Michigan and in order to communicate our positions on various emerging deer management issues, MUCC Policy Staff have compiled all of the most recent polices related to deer management, CWD, deer baiting and feeding, privately-owned captive cervid operations, and high fence harvest that have been adopted by the voting delegates at past MUCC Annual Conventions. The adopted language is summarized and the year adopted is in parentheses. If you have any questions or would like the full resolution, please refer them to Amy Trotter at [email protected].

EMERGING ISSUES IN DEER MANAGEMENT
• Urban Deer Management: MUCC supports the creation of a statewide urban deer management plan emphasizing bowhunting and venison donation. (2016)
• Crossbows: MUCC adopts a position of no longer opposing the use of crossbows during the archery season as they have not resulted in any significant conflict to the archery deer season. (2016)
• Airbows: Support legislation to add to the definition of pneumatic gun, pneumatic guns that launch arrows; and work with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Natural Resources Commission in the regulation of pneumatic guns. (2016)
• Federal Fish and Wildlife Disease Trust Fund: Work with the National Wildlife Federation, other non-governmental organization partners and our congressional delegation to establish a federal fish and wildlife disease trust fund that would be available for state agency response to fish and wildlife disease outbreaks. This trust fund should be established outside of the discretionary spending framework established by Congress so that the funds are not subject to appropriation by Congress. (2016)
• Poaching: MUCC supported legislation to create a restitution formula for deer poaching based on antler points and an escalation of fines for trophy deer.

BAITING AND FEEDING
• MUCC opposes the use of bait as a means to harvest white-tailed deer, due to the concerns of disease transmission. MUCC also opposes recreational feeding of deer. (2007)
• MUCC supports limited supplemental feeding programs in the Upper Peninsula during severe winter conditions. (2010)
• Also, encourage the DNR to plan winter cuttings for deeryards on state land in the northern U.P. to help as many deer survive winter as possible, and, where cuttings are not planned, to consider changing DNR policy to allow volunteers to provide supplemental food to deer in those areas in such a way that overbrowsing will be minimized. (2014)
• MUCC should work with the Michigan Legislature to require all retail outlets for baiting and feeding products to post (in plain view within 5 feet) an informational poster telling users of these products the fines and penalties they will be subject to if they are used as deer bait or deer feed in certain areas of Michigan’s Lower Peninsula. (2010)


CWD
• MUCC supports the recommendations of the Michigan CWD Task Force (2004) and encourages the state and federal government to accept and fund the recommendations. MUCC also supports education efforts on CWD
• Urges measures be taken to stop the import of all deer, elk and exotic game except boned meat, capes and antlers into Michigan (2002). Currently pursing legislation to increase fines and penalties for illegal carcass imports (2016).

CAPTIVE CERVIDS
• MUCC should call on the Governor, the MDNR, and the Michigan Department of Agriculture to immediately cease issuance of registrations for new confined cervid facilities, impose a strict schedule for expiration of registrations for facilities in noncompliance, and limit future registrations to and by the renewal, transfer, or sale of current registrations. (2010)
• MUCC participated in and supports the recommendations from the Captive Cervid Working Group (2006) that developed strict standards and regulations for the existing captive cervid industry. MUCC also calls for regulation and enforcement to be funded by the captive cervid industry.
• MUCC supports the fair and equitable phase out of captive cervid facilities in Michigan through a moratorium on new/expanded facilities and voluntary buy-out incentives. (2005)
• MUCC does not recognize the act of taking wildlife within high fence enclosures as “hunting”, but encourage those captive cervid facilities that offer commercial harvest to do so in a manner which incorporates sufficient size and design to allow for a reasonable opportunity for “fair chase” and animal sanctuary. (2006)
• MUCC defines “fair chase” as: the ethical, sportsmanlike, and lawful taking of free-ranging wild game animals, which extends beyond the hunt itself as an attitude and a way of life based in a deep-seated respect for wildlife, for the environment, and for other individuals who share the bounty of this state’s natural resources. (2006)
• Seeks a moratorium on new cervid farm registrations. Also urges double fencing of cervid farms and authorizes the Board of Directors to amend this resolution as science indicates and protection of the whitetail deer herd demands (2002)

HABITAT
• MUCC urge the formation of an independent ad hoc advisory committee comprised of both regional sportsmen’s interest groups together with wildlife management professionals for the purpose of creating criteria for the use of deer range improvement program (DRIP) funds in a manner which is consistent with their expressed purpose and also gives consideration to those opportunities which may exist to maximize the effectiveness of these funds together with the white-tailed deer management policy on a regional basis. (2010)
• Assist the DNR in creating a collaborative plan to improve existing deer yarding complexes and restore yarding complexes on both state and federal land. (2006)
• Encourage and work with the DNR , U.S. Forest Service, and private landowners to develop and implement a deer range management program (1998)
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With CWD in the central LP, and a likely bait ban coming to the area, it’s time to change the DRIP funding and allocate money to the people that actually pay the bulk of the fees.

To dissuade people from baiting in the CWD zones, we should allocate DRIP money to that area instead of the UP, where only around 10% of hunters even use.

At least half of the money should go to where 90% of the payers hunt. And despite the lore, there are lots of area’s in the central LP with poor habitat.
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Well at least they don't oppose crossbows anymore....because their predictions were flat out WRONG !
Nothing new for two years?
So why the post?
Not the first time they have been wrong.......
Well at least they don't oppose crossbows anymore....because their predictions were flat out WRONG !
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I was at an NRC meeting when they were discussing allowing crossbows.

Crazy man.
Well at least they don't oppose crossbows anymore....because their predictions were flat out WRONG !
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I'm guessing air bows will be legal during the archery season in a few years. If that happens, they may as well combine all the seasons into one. Anyone know if they passed the bill allowing them during this years archery hunt for handicapped hunters yet? My oldest boy would qualify.
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Their views of "fair chase" rules and ethics are written awkwardly and appear rather incomplete, sloppy, and vague. I would prefer a more well-defined statement or list on that issue, such as that from the Fred Bear Sports Club; as well as inclusion of the complete listing of Hunter Ethics, such as that from the Boone and Crockett Club.

Perhaps this is only because of the way the list was put together as 'compiled policies'.
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Not so far as I know. I believe the last digest simply stated airbows were not legal, and made no exceptions. If I had it my way, crossbows would still be for disabled hunters with a medically documented need only. Even that ("need") could be disputed for some, as I've seen a 40 lb compound drawn with one arm on the bow and teeth on the string (mouth hold/release) and shot several bulls-eyes at 30 yds.
I'm guessing air bows will be legal during the archery season in a few years. If that happens, they may as well combine all the seasons into one. Anyone know if they passed the bill allowing them during this years archery hunt for handicapped hunters yet? My oldest boy would qualify.
The guy I met shooting like that had some rough teeth.
Not so far as I know. I believe the last digest simply stated airbows were not legal, and made no exceptions. If I had it my way, crossbows would still be for disabled hunters with a medically documented need only. Even that ("need") could be disputed for some, as I've seen a 40 lb compound drawn with one arm on the bow and teeth on the string (mouth hold/release) and shot several bulls-eyes at 30 yds.
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That's why I wouldn't do it, unless I were able to use a device like a custom bite guard that perfectly protected the teeth.
The guy I met shooting like that had some rough teeth.
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You mean "Compiled Politics" from the MUCC leadership, without consideration of their members or reality.....that I would agree with.
Their views of "fair chase" rules and ethics are written awkwardly and appear rather incomplete, sloppy, and vague. I would prefer a more well-defined statement or list on that issue, such as that from the Fred Bear Sports Club; as well as inclusion of the complete listing of Hunter Ethics, such as that from the Boone and Crockett Club.

Perhaps this is only because of the way the list was put together as 'compiled policies'.
Looks like they are voting on HB 5180 this Thursday or they will propose changes. I am for it for handicapped only people, but we know what happened with crossbows.
Not so far as I know. I believe the last digest simply stated airbows were not legal, and made no exceptions. If I had it my way, crossbows would still be for disabled hunters with a medically documented need only. Even that ("need") could be disputed for some, as I've seen a 40 lb compound drawn with one arm on the bow and teeth on the string (mouth hold/release) and shot several bulls-eyes at 30 yds.
Some would argue that it was the compound that most changed archery season, away from its roots.
Why still so much negitivity on the cross bow ? The new hi end compounds shoot just as fast and flat as the crossbow , and don’t even try to blame more wounding of deer on the weapon place blame at the true cause The Shooter who doesn’t practice with thier weapon .
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There are all kinds of proposed resolutions that pass and do not pass. Can’t post everything. Here are a couple of deer related ones.

Resolution #2017-13
Requires 2/3 Majority

Submitted by: U.P. Whitetails of Marquette County
MUCC Region: 1
Passed:MUCC Annual Convention, June 17, 2017
Title:BRINGING CERVID CARCASSES INTO MICHIGAN FROM OTHER STATES

WHEREAS, chronic wasting disease, (CWD), has been discovered in some 23 States, 3 Provinces and 1
Scandinavian country; and
WHEREAS, this number has been increasing and the number changing every year; and
WHEREAS, Michigan’s current regulation prohibits whole cervid carcasses from being brought into the state from infected states and lists every state and province that has CWD, yet this list of CWD areas could change even before the Hunting Digest is published; and
WHEREAS, there is a need to simplify this regulation, increase penalties, and further reduce the chances of CWD or other diseases being brought into Michigan. NOW,
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that Michigan adopt a stance that Minnesota, Montana and other states have adopted in that any cervid, (deer, moose, elk,…) carcass brought into Michigan (whether taken from a wild or captive population) be in the form of deboned meat, clean skullcap, finished taxidermy, and/or other parts not anticipated to carry CWD prions; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Michigan Legislature work to increase the fines and penalties for violations of this whole carcass prohibition; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the United States Fish and Wildlife Service and other federal agencies as necessary, with support from the Michigan delegation of U.S. Senators and U.S. Representatives, work to make the prohibition of carcass movement a federal regulation.

Resolution #2017-14
Requires 2/3 Majority

Submitted by: Michigan State Chapter of the Quality Deer Management Association
MUCC Region: 9
Passed:MUCC Annual Convention, June 17, 2017
Title:CAPTIVE CERVID REGULATION REFORM


WHEREAS, Chronic Wasting Disease poses an existential threat to Michigan’s deer herd and Michigan deer hunting.
WHEREAS, Chronic Wasting Disease, if it becomes established in the wild herd, cannot be eliminated using any currently known methods.
WHEREAS, Two captive cervid facilities in Michigan have contracted Chronic Wasting Disease
WHEREAS, there is a real threat of disease transmission if captive and wild deer can comingle at a captive cervid facility fence line.
WHEREAS, the ongoing investigation into a Mecosta county captive cervid facility has exposed gaps in the current captive cervid regulations, enforcement process, and funding of necessary enforcement and disease control. NOW,
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Michigan United Conservation Clubs work with the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Department of Agriculture Wildlife Services, Quality Deer Management Association, and other interested parties, to reform captive cervid facility regulations to reduce the chance of Chronic Wasting Disease transmission between captive cervid facilities and the wild deer herd. These regulatory reforms shall include, but not be limited to:
• establishing double fencing to reduce opportunities for transmission through the fence,
• a mandatory supervised testing process to eliminate opportunities for illegal substitution of deer for testing from outside the facility,
• a state funding mechanism that would provide adequate funding for Chronic Wasting Disease surveillance and response both inside and outside of captive cervid facilities,
• improved cervid facility record keeping requirements,
• non removable cervid tagging,
• oversight of cervid transportation,
• a 30-day maximum period for depopulating an infected facility once the decision has been made to do so, and
• improved enforcement mechanisms.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that these policies are intended to supplement the 2010 MUCC policy that requests that an immediate moratorium on new captive cervid facilities, imposes a strict schedule for expiration of registrations of facilities not in compliance, and limits future registrations to and by renewal, transfer, or sale of current registrations.
Nothing new for two years?
So why the post?
All resolutions do not get passed. Example.

FAILED RESOLUTION

Proposed Resolution #2017-01
Requires 2/3 Majority

Submitted by: Robert Pattison, St. Joseph County Conservation Club
MUCC Region: 7
Passed:MUCC Conservation Policy Board meeting, September 24, 2016, Failed at MUCC 2017 Annual Convention
Title:YOUTH HUNTER SUPERVISION



WHEREAS, the current law states that youth hunters who have completed a hunter safety course must be accompanied by an adult hunting, which is the same criteria for an apprentice youth hunter who have never held a gun; and
WHEREAS, the word “accompany” is defined to mean “to go along with and while staying within a distance from the person that permits uninterrupted, unaided visual and auditory communication”; and
WHEREAS, the current law does not acknowledge the different developmental levels that youth hunters are at, and there is no mechanism that relates these levels to the amount of supervision necessary; and
WHEREAS, treating these classes of youth hunters equally is illogical; and
WHEREAS, Michigan has three categories of youth hunters: youth who are eligible for the mentored youth hunting program; youth who are eligible for an apprentice license; and, youth who have completed a certified hunter safety program; and
WHEREAS, all three of these categories require adult supervision; and
WHEREAS, the current law recognizes the importance and value of supervision with a younger, inexperienced hunter, but does not recognize the importance and value of higher education and experience in youth hunters. NOW,
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that Michigan United Conservation Clubs (MUCC) work with the Michigan
Legislature, Department of Natural Resources (DNR), and the Natural Resources Commission (NRC) to institute the following: On private land only, not open to public access such as commercial forest act land, a minor who is at least 14 years old shall be permitted to hunt within a distance no greater than 660 feet from the parent or legal guardian which permits uninterrupted electronic communication and allows the parent or legal guardian to come to the immediate aid of the youth. The youth hunter MUST have completed all of the following criteria:
• has successfully completed a certified hunter safety program,
• has been properly licensed in the immediate two preceding seasons.
I can tell you for a fact that you don't need to spend much time practicing with a crossbow. My handicapped son has one and all he needs to do is take a couple of shots a varying distances to make sure the scope is still on. He can pull it out of the case at any point in time and split arrows, which he has been doing since he was 11.
Why still so much negitivity on the cross bow ? The new hi end compounds shoot just as fast and flat as the crossbow , and don’t even try to blame more wounding of deer on the weapon place blame at the true cause The Shooter who doesn’t practice with thier weapon .
Same can be said for a compound ! When I got my first compound I was shooting less than 1” groups before I left the bow shop at 30 yards , and split many dozens of arrows too . With proper teaching and practice the compound is very accurate too! So your saying because a crossbow is accurate and therefore kills effectively they are a bad thing ?
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