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Inscrutable Mastermind
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·








On entering the rectangular field from the two-track, on the left is Miscanthus Sinensis (gracilis) and just to the right of it is Erianthus Ravennae.














Here is a picture of switchgrass on the left, burn break in the middle and Erianthus R. curving around the corner holding back some goldenrod and pear trees beyond it on the right.




A couple pairs of Ecos pears from Oikos trees in their third year after planting on the back side of the Erianthus

 

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On entering the rectangular field from the two-track, on the left is Miscanthus Sinensis (gracilis) and just to the right of it is Erianthus Ravennae.














Here is a picture of switchgrass on the left, burn break in the middle and Erianthus R. curving around the corner holding back some goldenrod and pear trees beyond it on the right.




A couple pairs of Ecos pears from Oikos trees in their third year after planting on the back side of the Erianthus

 

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Inscrutable Mastermind
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
How do you keep the non competing grasses controlled in the erianthus?
You mean the competing grasses?

Cool season grasses can be sprayed with roundup before the Erianthus emerges as a warm season grass when the ground warms up. I've never done it but you can also spray late in the fall after the Erianthus turns brown.
You could also use a guard just like when spraying roundup just like when spraying trees.

You can also use simazine pre- and post-emergence.

After the Erianthus matures after a couple seasons it really will out-compete any cool season grasses.

Here is a thread I posted three years ago:

http://www.michigan-sportsman.com/forum/threads/update-on-tall-ornamental-grasses.432137/
 

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Yes I meant competing grasses. I planted mine 2 years ago (3rd growing season) and I have a lot of competition from a warm season grass which I don't know what it is. So I spray round up in the spring but by the time the competing grasses emerge the Erianthus is too big to try to respray roundup. Maybe one more year will be enough for the Erianthus to out compete the competing grasses. Thank you
 

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Inscrutable Mastermind
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A couple pairs of Ecos pears from Oikos trees in their third year after planting on the back side of the Erianthus


 

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Inscrutable Mastermind
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
How do the Ecos pears compare to those offered by Oikos?
The Ecos pears are a variety that I did purchase from by Oikos Tree Crops.

You've heard of human biodiversity HBD? Well these are PBD pears.They were from a single tree in Michigan whose Pakistani origins crossed with neighboring Asian and European pears and created this massive genetic mix. (Pyrus x communis x lecontei x pyrifolia)

Originally they were "select" bare roots (meaning a little bit bigger). And I grew them in the garden for two years in rootmaker bags before I put them in the field.

http://oikostreecrops.com/products/edible-fruits/wild-pears/ecos-pear/
 

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In that first series of pictures how many rows are we looking at? I really need to make the time and get some in the ground. Thought this was the spring and then time seemed to slip away.....
 

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Inscrutable Mastermind
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Really just one bisecting the rectangular field. And a small corner blocking with Erianthus R. and Miscanthus sinensis .
Click on the aerial to expand it.

 
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