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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Aug. 6, 2015

Contact: Chad Stewart, 517-282-4810 or 517-641-4903 ext. 263

DNR confirms third deer positive for CWD; hunter participation is critical this fall

Today, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources announced that a third free-ranging deer in Meridian Township (Ingham County) has tested positive for chronic wasting disease (CWD). The deer was a 5-year-old doe. All three CWD-positive deer detected thus far have been discovered within a mile of one another.

“As we stated with the second positive deer, this news is not surprising,” said Dr. Steve Schmitt, DNR wildlife veterinarian. “The good news is that all three deer came from the same small area.” Genetic analyses carried out by Michigan State University’s Molecular Ecology Laboratory indicate that all three positive animals were related as part of an extended family. Previous research has shown that CWD often is transmitted within family groups because of their close contact.

Hunters are critical to helping the DNR understand the prevalence and geographic distribution of the disease.

“We have focused our efforts thus far in the area around the first case,” Schmitt continued. ”We need individuals who have always hunted in Ingham County and surrounding counties to keep hunting. The DNR can’t fight this disease without their support. Hunters need to have their deer checked and tested so we can determine if this disease is established over a broad area or just persisting in a local pocket.”

In addition, it is critical that if an individual hunts outside Michigan in a state or province that has CWD in their free-ranging deer, elk, or moose that only the following parts of deer, elk, or moose carcasses are brought into Michigan:

Deboned meat. Antlers. Antlers attached to a skull cap cleaned of all brain and muscle tissue. Hides. Upper canine teeth. Finished taxidermy mount. If a hunter is notified by another state or province that a deer, elk, or moose that was brought into Michigan tested positive for CWD, that hunter must contact the DNR Wildlife Disease Lab within two business days (8 a.m. to 5 p.m.) at 517-336-5030.

CWD is a fatal neurological disease that affects white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose. It is caused by the transmission of infectious, self-multiplying proteins (prions) contained in saliva and other body fluids of infected animals. Susceptible animals can acquire CWD by direct exposure to these fluids, or from environments contaminated with these fluids or the carcass of a diseased animal.

Some chronically CWD-infected animals will display abnormal behaviors, progressive weight loss and physical debilitation. There is no cure; once a deer is infected with CWD, it will die.

To date, there is no evidence that chronic wasting disease presents any risk to non-cervids, including humans, either through contact with an infected animal or from handling venison. However, as a precaution, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization recommend that infected animals not be consumed as food by either humans or domestic animals.

The DNR provides CWD weekly updates online at www.michigan.gov/cwd. Announcements of additional CWD-positive deer within that same area will be listed online. Additional news updates will be issued if a CWD-positive deer is found outside the immediate area.

http://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/MIDNR/bulletins/1132a39



Friday, July 17, 2015

Michigan confirms CWD in second free-ranging white-tailed deer

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2015/07/michigan-confirms-cwd-in-second-free.html

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Michigan confirms state's first case of chronic wasting disease in free-ranging white-tailed deer

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2015/05/michigan-confirms-states-first-case-of.html

Wednesday, August 05, 2015

*** Ohio confirms to me Chronic Wasting Disease CWD Spreads 19 confirmed cases to date ***

Just got off the phone with Christy Clevenger of Ohio

Ohio Department of Agriculture March 2012 – Present (3 years 6 months)Reynoldsburg, Ohio CWD program

Ms. Clevenger confirmed, to date, from the Yoder debacle, 1 confirmed case of CWD from the Hunting Preserve, 2 confirmed cases from the Breeding Farm, and 16 confirmed cases of CWD from the Breeder Depopulation, with a total to date of 19 cases of CWD in Ohio...

Terry

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2015/08/ohio-confirms-to-me-chronic-wasting.html

Saturday, August 01, 2015

Texas CWD Medina Captive Two more deer test positive for chronic wasting disease CWD TSE Prion

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2015/08/texas-cwd-medina-captive-two-more-deer.html

Sunday, August 02, 2015

TEXAS CWD, Have you been ThunderStruck, deer semen, straw bred bucks, super ovulation, and the potential TSE Prion connection, what if?

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2015/08/texas-cwd-have-you-been-thunderstruck.html

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/

Tuesday, August 4, 2015

FDA U.S. Measures to Protect Against BSE

http://bseusa.blogspot.com/2015/08/fda-us-measures-to-protect-against-bse.html


Terry S. Singeltary Sr.


Thursday, August 06, 2015

Michigan DNR confirms third deer positive for CWD; hunter participation is critical this fall

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2015/08/michigan-dnr-confirms-third-deer.html
 

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I'd like to imagine that hunter participation is critical right now, and not wait until the hunting season.

If I lived there, I'd shoot every fawn I saw in my back yard. If arrested, I'd pay the fine and shoot some more.

The deer in that zone need to be all killed, and the sooner the better. If I had dictatorial powers, it would have been done a month ago.
 

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I'd like to imagine that hunter participation is critical right now, and not wait until the hunting season.

If I lived there, I'd shoot every fawn I saw in my back yard. If arrested, I'd pay the fine and shoot some more.

The deer in that zone need to be all killed, and the sooner the better. If I had dictatorial powers, it would have been done a month ago.

I agree, and I thought that was the plan if found within 6 months of the season starting. Can landowners get disease tags now or not?

Ganzer
 

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Absolutely no way to completely eradicate even the core zone. Some areas are not huntable and some landowners will refuse access. In another month, the deer will be travelling much further as bucks claim territories.
 

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Over 100 years ago, whitetails were essentially eradicated from southern Michigan, by people that had far less sophisticated weaponry and technology than we have today. It absolutely could be done, and done quickly, if authorities had the will to do so.

This is Michigan, more bucks disperse in the spring than the fall.
 

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Over 100 years ago, whitetails were essentially eradicated from southern Michigan, by people that had far less sophisticated weaponry and technology than we have today. It absolutely could be done, and done quickly, if authorities had the will to do so.

This is Michigan, more bucks disperse in the spring than the fall.
Farmlegend, the areas that these deer live are wide spans of marsh, surrounded by dense amounts of people (snooty people at that, lol). Gonna be a tough undertaking. They want hunter support to help, yet I can't even get straight answers from DNR about what they expect us to do for this years hunt. Best I can tell, I have to wait 7-10 days for CWD test results..... so I guess I have it processed, and throw the meat out if positive??? Also wondering if they take the head of the deer to test....what if I shoot a Pope & Young class? We are far too close to the season for them not to have addressed this yet.
 

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Farmlegend, the areas that these deer live are wide spans of marsh, surrounded by dense amounts of people (snooty people at that, lol). Gonna be a tough undertaking. They want hunter support to help, yet I can't even get straight answers from DNR about what they expect us to do for this years hunt. Best I can tell, I have to wait 7-10 days for CWD test results..... so I guess I have it processed, and throw the meat out if positive??? Also wondering if they take the head of the deer to test....what if I shoot a Pope & Young class? We are far too close to the season for them not to have addressed this yet.
You can find some FAQ answers here. Don't worry more answers will be available long before you can legally kill a deer.
http://www.michigan.gov/emergingdiseases/0,4579,7-186-25806-355584--,00.html
 

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Over 100 years ago, whitetails were essentially eradicated from southern Michigan, by people that had far less sophisticated weaponry and technology than we have today. It absolutely could be done, and done quickly, if authorities had the will to do so.

This is Michigan, more bucks disperse in the spring than the fall.
But, but, but.....prevalence. :cool:
 

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My horns, must have my precious horns :lol:

 

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Farmlegend, the areas that these deer live are wide spans of marsh, surrounded by dense amounts of people (snooty people at that, lol). Gonna be a tough undertaking. They want hunter support to help, yet I can't even get straight answers from DNR about what they expect us to do for this years hunt. Best I can tell, I have to wait 7-10 days for CWD test results..... so I guess I have it processed, and throw the meat out if positive??? Also wondering if they take the head of the deer to test....what if I shoot a Pope & Young class? We are far too close to the season for them not to have addressed this yet.
Were talking MI, I wouldn't worry to much about that happening. Looking at your avatar, you seem to be in the upper 1% though.
 

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Interesting article on prion diseases - http://crossbowcommunications.com/chronic-wasting-disease-a-byproduct-of-sewage-mismanagement/

These 2 points are especially scary to me as a hunter:

"The bodies of prion victims, regardless of species, are highly toxic and contagious. Hunting knives and saws used on sick wildlife are infected forever. Processing plants that cut and grind wildlife carcasses for hunters (before CWD tests are complete) are contaminated forever. Every animal processed after an infected carcass will become infected. Pickups and trailers that transport infected animals are hopelessly contaminated. The prion pathways created by one hunting trip can explode exponentially within hours."

"It’s also ludicrous to think that game processing plants are prion-free. Regulations in this arena are criminal. Thousands, possibly millions, of innocent people have been exposed to the prions from someone else’s sick deer. That’s because many are processed before testing or no testing is done at all."

Steve
 

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The author of that article makes a large number of completely unsubstantiated claims that have no basis in fact. He obviously has an agenda related to sewage treatment and is attempting to link anything bad he can think of, to it. His claim that naturally occurring fibromas in deer are "obviously a result of toxic exposure" is pure bunk as is his claim that EHD is "likely a disease caused by toxic overload from sewage and biosolids".

I would take anything he says with a major grain of salt as most of his claims seem to be composed solely of untreated bovine biosolids.
 

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The author of that article makes a large number of completely unsubstantiated claims that have no basis in fact. He obviously has an agenda related to sewage treatment and is attempting to link anything bad he can think of, to it. His claim that naturally occurring fibromas in deer are "obviously a result of toxic exposure" is pure bunk as is his claim that EHD is "likely a disease caused by toxic overload from sewage and biosolids".

I would take anything he says with a major grain of salt as most of his claims seem to be composed solely of untreated bovine biosolids.
I mostly agree with your position about that article--IMHO you have a pretty good grasp and understanding of the disease.

BUT, science has shown the prion is extremely difficult to destroy/inactivate except by incineration, alkaline hydrolysis, and, more recently, by the subtilisin enzyme (Prionzyme).

When the prion gets into water (rinsing an infected carcass/tools/environment (that will eventually flow into a sanitary water system lake, stream, pond, leaching into ground water, etc.), it's highly likely it will be transported, intact, away from the initial area. That's the part that scares me!

Steve
 

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I mostly agree with your position about that article--IMHO you have a pretty good grasp and understanding of the disease.

BUT, science has shown the prion is extremely difficult to destroy/inactivate except by incineration, alkaline hydrolysis, and, more recently, by the subtilisin enzyme (Prionzyme).

When the prion gets into water (rinsing an infected carcass/tools/environment (that will eventually flow into a sanitary water system lake, stream, pond, leaching into ground water, etc.), it's highly likely it will be transported, intact, away from the initial area. That's the part that scares me!

Steve
While it's true that prions are difficult to destroy, it's also likely that an individual prion does not pose a significant threat. As has been mentioned in other threads, it looks like there needs to be some concentration of prions present before a threshold is reached that results in the transmission of the disease. So if individual prions flow into a water system, they are likely to be diluted in a way that poses little threat in terms of transmitting the disease to another organism.

I'm more concerned about the potential for plant uptake of prions as a means of transmission, then I am about waterborne mechanisms.
 
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