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On Thu evening of Oct 1st my buddy arrowed a nice 2.5 YO 8-pointer on a farm near Imlay City. Waited 1.5 hrs till dark, to take up blood trail, followed it about 100-yards into heavy brush, then we lost blood trail at 9:20pm. Decided best not to push it, return at first light to recover. Found buck next morning in 15-mins, what was left of it. Weighed only 50lbs, only head, rack, and hide on one side remained, in 8-hours the Coyotes had eaten 80-90% of the deer carried off two legs, no guts, no meat, eaten down to the white bone.

Last night on stand had three coyotes come by twice could not get them to stop for a shot.

This losing deer to yotes is new to me, I am wary now, if we shoot another one in the evening, feels like wait an hour then full court press in the dark to recover is needed. I have always been cauious in the past if not sure back out and return in the morning approach, can't do that anymore in Yote Country.

I was reading online best way to deal with variments, there's calling, and trapping, then I read about poison, the FWS uses this "Compound 1080" on the different waterfowl preserves. What is best method for Predator removal?
 

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I'm not on board with the "when in doubt, back out" theory. I'll take my chances NOW. Lost way too many deer to the yotes.
 

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I've had yotes right up close when dressing deer in the dark.
They show up fast at the scent of blood or distress it seems.
Trapping would be recommended after deer season.
Depending on parcel size and location hounds might be invited in for a hunt or two.
Calling when effective can take some out but put others on alert.
Right now, if equipped to hunt them at night I would use the next deer gut pile as bait. Immediately after switching off from deer hunting so not to confuse legality though.
Confirm season and method of take first. Might be a week or so out yet.
If not prohibited beef blood for scent should suffice lacking a deer kill. Beef liver cut to bleed, or similar.
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Find a resposible trapper in your area. The mtpca has a list for people looking for help. Contact the association. Many of the board members post here on this forum so stop by the trapping forum looking for help and please do all of us sportsman a favor and keep the poison out of the woods.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the advice. Just feels like these Coyote numbers have really increased in the last 20-years. Prior to the early 90's I do not recall, hearing, seeing, or folks losing deer to them with this type of regularity.
 

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This one was shot by a high school kid last year. Since he shot it right before dark and it ran off, his dad thought it best to back out and leave it overnight. This is what was left in the morning. This was 10-15 miles east of us in Menominee County. They thought it was wolves but it could have just have easily been coyotes.

Unless I know the deer was gut shot, I don't leave anything in the woods overnight around here. A gut pile doesn't even last overnight. As of last week I had 73 pics of coyotes on my scouting cams which have been out since Aug 5th.

I absolutely agree with Wild Bill - Keep the poison out of the woods and hook up with a responsible trapper. Sportsmen don't poison wildlife. Thank you.

 

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This one was shot by a high school kid last year. Since he shot it right before dark and it ran off, his dad thought it best to back out and leave it overnight. This is what was left in the morning. This was 10-15 miles east of us in Menominee County. They thought it was wolves but it could have just have easily been coyotes.

Unless I know the deer was gut shot, I don't leave anything in the woods overnight around here. A gut pile doesn't even last overnight. As of last week I had 73 pics of coyotes on my scouting cams which have been out since Aug 5th.

I absolutely agree with Wild Bill - Keep the poison out of the woods and hook up with a responsible trapper. Sportsmen don't poison wildlife. Thank you.

Holy craps!! Them are some hungry yotes!!!
 

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1080 takes a federal license, IIRC
 

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I am in Oakland count and the yote howling at night this year makes you feel like you are much further north than here. Never lost a deer yet but it's coming.
 

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The only time I ever leave a deer over night is if I am not positive of the hit. In all my years hunting this only happened once. My philosophy? If your arrow confirms what you think you saw (and heard) when you took the shot - go for it!
Still, I back out for an hour after any shot to run back to the cabin, change my clothes, and get whatever is needed for tracking.
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I also have little knowledge and experience with this situation, but this thread is some great info to be aware of.
Are hunters responsible for tagging an animal that they shot, but was eaten by coyotes?
 

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I disagree with going after your deer if you lose blood or on a bad hit.
It's just a risk you have to deal with when leaving s deer over night.
I agree 100% - but you can lose blood on a good hit. For example a liver hit is probably seen as a bad hit, but you can probably start tracking that deer in 2 hours or so. Gut shot deer are good candidates for a "next morning" track, but in the case described in the OP they had already waited 1.5 hours to track. So hypothetically, even with a gut shot could have started tracking this deer at around midnight.
Anyway - I was saying trust your eyes, trust your arrow, and trust the sign. Still, if you didn't get a pass-through, its may be hard to distinguish between a good hit and a marginal hit.
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I also have little knowledge and experience with this situation, but this thread is some great info to be aware of.
Are hunters responsible for tagging an animal that they shot, but was eaten by coyotes?
My understanding of the law is they need to tag only if they claim any part of that deer.
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My understanding of the law is they need to tag only if they claim any part of that deer.
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that would seem strange to me. Sure it's a tough break but if that were really the law you could shoot a bunch of deer and just leave them. I see no motive to ever do that but it seems like that wouldn't be the policy. I would think if you kill an animal you should have to tag it.
 
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