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I'm still fairly new to the food plot world, but I have experimented and have done a fair amount of time studying and reading on this forum and some other sources of information. I have a dilemma that I'm trying to solve and appreciate any and all help. I will try to keep it as short as possible while still providing all necessary details.

My scenario: I have a 1 acre food plot that I planted last year with Tecomate Ultra Forage. I basically sprayed with gly in mid-late July, worked the ground with the cultivator a few weeks later then planted. I saw great success with my first ever food plot and was very happy with the results. The only complaint I had was that the bulbs didn't get as big as they should have. I probably planted a little too late, but having a heavy frost the third weekend of september didn't help either. This spring I was very limited on time and resources as I had a baby due at the beginning of April, so I attempted an early overseeding of clover and chicory. I did nothing to prepare the seed bed due to my circumstances. Needless to say the results were less than desirable. I think the lack of seedbed preparation combined with the spring planting and the drought produced very little clover/chicory, however it did a wonderful job of growing weeds.

My dilemma:

I would like to plant something like Michigan's Ultimate Blend to attempt to recapture the success I had with the Brassica's last year, but also provide a perennial plot that I can easily maintain in the future. I have a backpack sprayer and access to a cultivator and cultipacker, but that is it in the way of implements. The way I see it in my head I have three possible options (feel free to add more if there is something I'm missing:

1) Do something similar to last year where I spray with gly this coming weekend and then in a week or two cultivate, broadcast, and cultipack a brassica mix, then next year start prepping the plot in the spring for a fall planting of Michigan's Ultimate Blend following all the necessary steps, including the 3 sprayings throughout the year.

2) Spray once with gly this weekend, then in a week or two cultivate, broadcast, and cultipack Michigan's Ultimate Blend. This would give me Brassica's for the fall, as well as allow a perennial plot to get a good headstart for next year. My biggest concern is that I would only be spraying the plot with gly one time and I'm worried I may experience some serious weed competition in the spring.

3) Do nothing this year, and start prepping the food plot next spring for a fall planting of Michigan's Ultimate Blend. This option is the cheapest and would eliminate the risk of potentially wasting money with a planting this year (especially with the current drought conditions)

I see advantages and disadvantages to all three, but I'm looking for other opinions as I'm still relatively inexperienced. I would really like to do option 2, but I'm not sure if I can get away with just one spraying of gly. I'm also open to other ideas, but the ultimate goal is to end up with a good fall food source as well as getting a good head start on a perennial plot that I can maintain for years to come, whether I'm able to pull it off this year or next. Thanks in advance for your thoughts and responses.
 

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#2 if your ph is 6.5 or higher, if it is lower than that I would do option 1 with fall and spring applications of lime to get the ph to 6.5
 

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I'm a newb to this stuff to, but I'm sure someone with experience will chime in. I think #2 is your best option, but you might be told to modify it slightly. I wouldn't be anxious though, you should still have time to get a good plot in.

I'm in a similar boat as you except I had red clover growing as a cover crop and I disced it under a couple weeks ago, added fertilizer and will spray the Gly right after I plant and cultipack the MUB. I'm going that route because I had sprayed it earlier in the season and any weeds that germinate and start growing between the time I disced it a couple weeks ago and when I plant will then be killed with the Gly.
 

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#2 A soil sample is a big plus. Clover will grow in a 5 - 7 ph or so. You can tell if your soil is acidic by whats growing in the immediate area. If it is acidic I would throw a 1/2 ton of pell lime an acre, its a start for next springs soil sample. 100 lbs of triple 12 an acre if your doing a brassica/clover blend, the brassicas will need it. I'm sure you'll have a weed problem in the spring but thats why they make herbicides. Spray and mow regularly, its better not to fall behind on weed control. No reason you cant have a nice fall plot this yr and a nice clover plot next spring, Imo.
 

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I see you are in Davison. I live just south of Davison. If you PM me your phone number and what time to call I will call you and we can talk it over. 2 heads are better then 1 sometimes. I don't know how much I can help but I have been doing food plots for 12 years or so and have learn a little. I would go to Jake's site at http://www.habitatsolutions360.com/ He has some great seeds already mix up for what ever you are looking for. He keeps the prices as low as he can.
I would not miss the chance to plant something late summer or early fall. If nothing else it keeps the weeds from taking over. Something to consider, plant Rye (not rye grass) with wheat and 4 different kinds of clover in early fall. I have done that and had the best clover next Spring that you could ask for with not much work and it didn't cost a lot. I keep the clover in that plot for 4 years before it died out. I try to keep something for the deer to eat all year in some of my small food plots. Good luck.
 
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