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I've been thinking of getting into shooting a traditional bow..At first it will be for just shooting...but will move to try hunting with it....Whats a better choice for a beginner?
Thanks Ben
 

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The recurve grip would be a lot closer to a compound's than a longbow. You really need to go somewhere and try a few. Jay's has a good selection and a range. The Kazoo expo this weekend would be good for you but that's a bit of a haul from TC.
 

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IMO a recurve is easier to shoot than a long bow... I have and shot both
but it takes me a little more time to get dialed in with the longbow.
Try and shoot more than just one or two as they will all shoot differently
feel different...Find one you are comfortable with and practice ALOT!!!
 

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When first starting out you should get a low poundage bow (30-35#) to develop proper form and avoid developing bad habits such as short drawing, snap-shooting, creeping, and collapsing on the shot. A bad habit is very easy to develop, but tough to break. For this reason you should probably be looking at recurves, as it's tough to find longbows in that light a weight.
 

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Ben--I'm an old [email protected]#*t, who has handled traditional bows for over 50 years. I will share some of what I think.

I agree that a recurve riser will have the sight window cut almost, if not completely to, the centerline of the bow. This makes it feel and look, from the shooter's viewpoint, more like a compound. Being almost center cut, arrow spine is more forgiving if you use something other than wood arrows.

Historically, long bows have required just plain old work to get the arrows spined correctly to a given bow. I know! I have a mountain of wooden arrows because of the range of long, flat, and self bows I have owned--and still own. It's like each bow required an arrow spined specifically for it for the best flight.

From years of use, I find both styles of bow fun and rewarding to shoot. I--and this might surprise some--find both to be forgiving if (and a big IF) they have the correct arrow coming off them. Which brings me to today's arrow choices.

Again, this is only my opinion, scientifically based on...um-m-m...the sun comes up in the East??

I think the new carbon arrows, should you choose to use them off both long bows and recurves eleminates a lot of the 'critical-ness' of spine. For example, I shoot the same carbon arrows (same length, weight, etc.) off both bows in weight ranges from 50# to 60#. Never would that have happened for me with wooden arrows. Aluminum?? Maybe closer, but I still had to have several weights to make them fly with consistency.

I suspect keeping carbon arrows slightly longer than wooden (31" vs 29") coupled with the fact of smaller diameter for the spine, and less parallax (sp?) makes these arrows fly with consistency off both recures and long bows.

Do I particularly like carbon and aluminum? They're OK, but for 'like' wood has them both beat. However, carbons last and last for me; they stay straight; they are easy to use wraps and mount feather to; and they shoot well off both my recurves and long bows.

Now--which for someone thinking about making traditional part of their life--I don't know. It's too much of a personal choice. I love both and shoot both all the time. Once I decide I will hunt next fall with a given bow (I trade around with what's hanging on my wall), I shoot that bow a lot all spring and summer. I am already shooting almost every night in my pole barn with a long bow I will use next fall.

Best of luck, Arch
 

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While the conventional wisdom has always been that the recurve is easier to master, my personal experiences have been the opposite. I have owned a ton of recurves, but I always return to the longbows, as I seem to shoot them better.

I recommend going to some traditional shoots and shoot as many bows as possible. You will quickly figure out what is best for you.

Dan
 

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I'm drawn to the longbow, however, I still have yet to find one that doesn't produce handshock. I'm used to shooting a heavy Black Widow PMA, and every longbow I've tried shakes my fillings loose. I've shot a lot of them, and the most forgiving longbows were from Northern Mist, Black Widow, and Thunderstick. They produced the least amount of handshock, but it was still there. Maybe I'm just too sensative. I guess I'll just stick to my recurve for now...but man do I love the look of a longbow.
 

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All good advice so far - try a BUNCH of differant bows and see what works for You. Remmember what Howard Hill said; " I'm not a good enough bow shot, to shoot a recurve well." Gutshot - Sounds like You are gripping the bow too tight, try easing to a "light" hand. That will make a BIG differance, 'specially with a longbow. Bob
 

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Yes, I have shot some longbows that shook my hand, but I have also shot many recurves that did too :) Try shooting one of LaClair's Shrews. :)

Dan
 
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