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Discussion Starter #1
I am going to give a new area of the state a try this spring and have a few questions. What is the best way to located where the Turkeys are roosting? I will be going up there in february-march time frame and would like to try and figure out where they are roosting. I will be taking a kid out this year and would like to have some action right off the bat to keep him interested. Any pointers in how to find where they are roosting would be appreciated. I am going to take my owl hooter, and probably pick up a crow call to get some responses but this probably won't help me find the roost unless I am there before day light. Thanks Guys
 

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That's too far out to scout a roost in my opinion. Our roosts change between winter and spring by a good distance. If you have to do it in that time frame go as late as you can in March.
 

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That's too far out to scout a roost in my opinion. Our roosts change between winter and spring by a good distance. If you have to do it in that time frame go as late as you can in March.
I do not have to do it that early, I can wait until the day before my season starts if I wanted to. I just thought it may be easier with snow on the ground. I usually hunt in Ionia County and have never really had our turkeys change roosting locations.
 

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Best bet scout a couple weeks before your hunt starts, use your locating calls. I personally don't use any other calls in fear of educating them.
I look for droppings on the ground , areas where they have been looking for food, open areas ect...scout for them that early would be a waste of time.
Locate them the night before, gun them down in the morning :)
my 2 cents....
 

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Start the first weeks of April. Hopefully warm weather won't mess mating season up for all of us. Use a variety of calls, crow, owl, goose, duck, a hawk shrill, even a car horn has made them gobble. Whatever you do, do not use a coyote call! Once you locate the general direction by "putting them to bed" I would sneak into the general area an hour before dusk and glass for the roosting tree. You should be able to determine the size of your flock by the numbers in the tree or trees. They will stick out like a sore thumb against the waning light.

If you are not an early morning guy (I am not an early morning guy) you can find dusting bowls, food areas, or watering areas. This way you can intercept them when they visit these areas. All the birds that have been shot with me or my group have been downed between 9am and 2pm. After toms breed the ladies in his flock he will be occupied with new "love" and will sometimes succumb to your charms. Late morning and early afternoon they will go to a strutting zone to entice ladies to visit.

I am excited for this season. I am taking my 9 y/o son out for the first time so he can try and take one. I will hunt with my crossbow and try to take one too!

Good Luck to all in taking a Thunder Chicken this year!
 

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I do not have to do it that early, I can wait until the day before my season starts if I wanted to. I just thought it may be easier with snow on the ground. I usually hunt in Ionia County and have never really had our turkeys change roosting locations.

I'm in Ionia co too and I see it every year. I'm sure it all depends roost to roost. I've had a spot nailed down only to never see them again on that roost or in vastly lower numbers the next week.
 

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Not sure how far north your "up there" spot is, but the farther north you go, the later you'll want to scout. You can use all the locator calls and such before season, but the best way to locate birds pre-season is being in the woods at daylight and listening.

As mentioned, a few weeks before your season get out there before daylight and listen for them to sound off naturally. Don't try to move in too close too early in the day or you'll bump them. Try to observe, from as far back as you can, the areas they roost in and the direction of travel once they hit the ground. This will give you a few options once your season arrives. Generally the roost areas stay the same from year to year, so make a mental note of where you are finding them and when for future reference.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
My up north spot really isn't that far North, around Newaygo area. Thanks everyone for the responses, I this kind of strengthened what I had thought. I will be waiting until it gets closer to my season. It is going to be hard for me to get up there in the morning as my cabin won't be open until the last weekend in April so I would have to be up very early to make it out before light. I will try some of the above mentioned and probably scout the last weekend in April to try and find the roost. Again thanks everyone.
 

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depending on what part of the season you are hunting the birds may be really vocal! a lot of people get caught up in finding birds in the roost! although this can be a great strategy it is not the only in my book! After the birds left the roost you should be able to cover ground with an old fashion yelp and get some action. this has worked for us up here in Presquisle county. If you can find them on the ground it may be a little easier to maneuver and set up to harvest one!! good luck
 

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Simple, Locate stands of Evergreens, most likely near homes/farms.
 
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