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Okay, my wife wants to tear down a wall between our kitchen and dinning room to open up the space. I'm dead set against it, so we are compromising and tearing down the wall :lol:

We live in colonial so how do I know if this is a load bearing wall or not?
 

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Okay, my wife wants to tear down a wall between our kitchen and dinning room to open up the space. I'm dead set against it, so we are compromising and tearing down the wall :lol:

We live in colonial so how do I know if this is a load bearing wall or not?
If the ceiling joists run perpendicular to it, most likely it is a load bearing wall.
That doesn't mean the wall can't be opened up, you can still do so, but will have to have the appropriate sized beam. A steel beam would be the best option, it would extend down from the ceiling the least.
 

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Okay, my wife wants to tear down a wall between our kitchen and dinning room to open up the space. I'm dead set against it, so we are compromising and tearing down the wall :lol:

We live in colonial so how do I know if this is a load bearing wall or not?
If it's a colonial, it more than likely is a bearing wall. One question though, Is the wall paralell or perpendicular to the front and back walls? If it's paralell to the front and back it is going to have the floor joists from the second floor running across them. If it's perpendicular, you may be able to remove it.

Good luck !:lol:

John
 

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Most first floor walls are load bearing. You could open it up by an arch-way and just put a header in to support the weight.
 

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If you do not know the difference between a bearing wall and one that is not you should not consider doing any work at all on your home!!!!!:confused::sad: But what the heck! go ahead and tear down the wall then go upstairs and jump real hard on the floor above the wall, in fact get the whole family to jump with you,invite the in-laws too. If the floor does not collapse it just might not be a bearing wall,and you just might be a red-neck......:lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the help guys, I think I just got out of o bunch of work:D
 

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If it is a load bearing wall ,you will need to run a beam across the opening to cary the load. size of gluelam beam( or header) will be depended on the span of the opening. better if you get the advice of a carpenter.
 

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Either way, I'd put a beam in anyways. If it's load-bearing, you have to bear that load somehow , temporarily, before you start tearing anything out. Get a carpenter to look at it, and determine the size of the nessesary beam. You could also ask at a real lumber yard. Whatever you do, don't ask anyone at Home Depot.
 

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My .02, hopefully before you do anything drastic - If you have to come here and ask how to tell if a wall is load bearing - don't tear any walls down. It's not always easy to tell if a wall is load bearing or not, I've seen and fixed several peoples "mistakes" when it came to tearing out a load bearing wall. If you tear one out by mistake the "best case scenario" is it takes a while for things to start to sag and crack (heavy snow helps). Worst case scenario is something caves in on you while you're ripping it out. If you decide to try it anyway...stay away from any walls that contain glue/lam beams or "significant" headers, walls that are near the middle of expansive rooms, walls that are located in-line with with any steel beams in the basement, etc.

hope that helps and good luck.
 
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