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Right on guys, appreciate the responses, and more so, the evidence of good angling ethics. Not too surprising given the dedication to the sport most regular posters have on this site, but still, good to hear. Last night we canceled our preferred destination, went searching and luckily found a river that was 67 at 9:30pm. Measured it twice just to make sure. The thing that scares me for our trout fisheries this summer is how darn low all streams are, as mentioned above. NEVER seen this many red circles on the USGS state map. If it keeps up temps are going to flirt with the flat-out lethal range for brook and RBTs of mid-70s for over 24 hours straight in several rivers. God help us if we get into lethal brown trout range. This is what truly scares me since it wouldn't matter if anglers were paying attention or not, the trout would simply be crayfish food.

Do your cool-weather dances, prayers, chants whatever...
 

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I think I'll just be enjoying the bikini hatch for a while. The few small spring fed streams I know are plenty cold still, but easily over fished.
 

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Right on guys, appreciate the responses, and more so, the evidence of good angling ethics. Not too surprising given the dedication to the sport most regular posters have on this site, but still, good to hear. Last night we canceled our preferred destination, went searching and luckily found a river that was 67 at 9:30pm. Measured it twice just to make sure. The thing that scares me for our trout fisheries this summer is how darn low all streams are, as mentioned above. NEVER seen this many red circles on the USGS state map. If it keeps up temps are going to flirt with the flat-out lethal range for brook and RBTs of mid-70s for over 24 hours straight in several rivers. God help us if we get into lethal brown trout range. This is what truly scares me since it wouldn't matter if anglers were paying attention or not, the trout would simply be crayfish food.

Do your cool-weather dances, prayers, chants whatever...
Browns can survive in waters up to 80 degrees for short periods... let's hope it doesn't get that bad..
 

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How high did the water temp get on the au sable last summer? It was pretty much in the mid 80s to low 90s the entire month of July if I remember correctly.
 

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How high did the water temp get on the au sable last summer? It was pretty much in the mid 80s to low 90s the entire month of July if I remember correctly.
Just below Mio Dam the temp stayed above 70 for ten days starting around 7/4. The water cools as it gets further from the dam and the above 70 temps started at McKinley a couple days later and lasted six days. A huge difference between this year and last is the low water. Last year there were lots of rain events and lots of groundwater inputs helping keep the rivers cool. We desperately need rain. Temps that stay above 74 for a few days will kill a lot of fish. Temps that stay above 76 for a single day will kill a lot of fish. Got to have that groundwater input to cool the rivers at night and provide thermal refuges during the day. I know a spot in the lower river where a swamp drains in and when the water is 70+ there will be dozens of fish stacked up in it, a bunch of them over 20".
 

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Funny, I remember quite a few years ago I gave someone here some flack about fishing for Skams in the creek mouths when the main river was like 80degres. He was surprised when he returned the next morning and there was a bunch of dead Skams floating in the shallows. Members here called me every name in the book for calling him out. I felt awful. Wished I hadn't said anything.

I ended up taking that same person fishing with me. Showed him all my favorite spots. We actually became good friends. Then he moved to Alaska :)
 

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Put on a bathing suit and water shoes and checked some spots on the Boardman. Temps around Ranch Rudolf were 67-68. Shumsky and Beitner 68-70. Unreal. It is critical we get rain. The river is the lowest I’ve ever seen in the 30 years I’ve been on it.


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When the water gets that warm I don't go for trout, with the exception of one spot that has water that stays in an acceptable range. I can't see killing trout, or any fish for that matter, just cuz I can. And for what it's worth, that guide that said he can handle the fish in warm water, is either an idiot, ill informed, or just plain greedy and doesn't give a hoot.
 

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A unrelated PSA.

There is a tree down that crosses the entire river about 2.6 miles downstream of the M-66 launch, at the end of Puffer rd.
 

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So long as you're keeping any legal size fish you catch, why not? Better than throwing them back to die so you can keep fishing. Guess you ought to count sub legal fish towards your limit too, assuming you ever catch small ones. But if you want to release any fish best not to go when it's too warm.
 

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So this is new to me. I’ve recently started to do more trout fishing and I’m curious.

Are you saying the fish die at 70 degrees in general or the stress of catching them kills them because of the heat?

I’m a catch and eat guy but I do try and be as responsible to the fishery as I can.
 
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Are you saying the fish die at 70 degrees in general or the stress of catching them kills them because of the heat?

The conventional wisdom is that it's a combination of factors including acidosis (lactic acid build up) from a prolonged fight and low dissolved oxygen levels in the warm water conspire to leave the trout going belly up soon after the battle.

Water above 70 degrees exacerbates the situation.
 

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What PunyTrout said. This year is very unusual. Most of the time you only have to worry about the stretches below dams and those are even ok with some cool nights or rain. Right now temps are pushing the danger mark far above dams and the long term forecast doesn’t show much relief. Wait a few weeks until I’m on vacation and we’ll have floods and day time highs in the 50s. That’ll be good streamer weather anyway.

This is a personal choice of mine but I always give the fish a few days to recuperate once the temps drop. They bite ok but you can tell from the fight they aren’t healthy and they need time. After four or five days they’ll be scrappy as ever.
 

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Found some cold water this evening. 62 in some tribs to a bigger system. Thank god those arent warming too


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I hold off unless I’m fishing for keeps anyway, you’ll still see all the guides, with boats full of clients from Grayling to Gates & all thru flies only on the Manistee. Last year I questioned one of the guides about it as the temps were 74 degrees, he said it was ok for him to do it because he was a guide & he knew how to handle the fish. He looked to be all of 25 years old.
One of the reasons I hung up my fly rod last year.
I’m sure some still run. That’s irresponsible. I know the Old Au Sable shop canceled all their trip this week. Couple guides I know personally have as well.


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Not on the big streams but on a little creek that runs through brother's yard. It got so warm that it killed hundreds of brookies and browns. He contacted the DNR and after a couple of weeks they told him what was going on. He gathered all of them that were still fresh and we had a huge trout fry. Haven't caught a decent trout in there since.
 
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