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Just checked the USGS gauges. Here we are on June 8th and the So. Branch of Au Sable is 70 degrees and climbing. Below Mio is 72 and climbing. Upper Mani is 67 and climbing (has been 70 several days recently). Temps above 70 degrees have a very high mortality for trout caught and released due to lack of dissolved oxygen in the warm water. They simply cannot recover after expending energy in the fight. This is a very well proven fact. Any hardcore skammie angler below Tippy can tell you all about this. Or if you really want to see a debacle, go down to Trail Creek in Indiana during a big summer run day and you can count the dozens (some days more) of dead skams in the muck that were released earlier that day upstream.

I am really curious how many folks recognize this as a serious issue and adjust their inland trout angling plans accordingly. By 'adjust' I simply mean wait to fish until dawn/dusk/dark or possibly not at all if the water doesn't cool off? So, I am posing the question to both elicit responses and also to shine a spotlight on this issue. Folks that are only trout fishing for the meal might say it doesn't matter for them. And if you keep every single trout you catch, that is certainly correct. That said, I'd say most would agree it's pretty hard to exclusively catch keeper trout and never release a small one (or large one if you like to let large spawners go to do their thing).
 

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I will be taking break until the weekend when things cool some back into the upper 70s low 80s. Id love to be on the stream but I dont need to fish just to watch them float away dead. The Boardman stays cooler than most I took a reading last night around 8pm. It was 69 so it was over 70 earlier. Today was even hotter.
 

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I hold off unless I’m fishing for keeps anyway, you’ll still see all the guides, with boats full of clients from Grayling to Gates & all thru flies only on the Manistee. Last year I questioned one of the guides about it as the temps were 74 degrees, he said it was ok for him to do it because he was a guide & he knew how to handle the fish. He looked to be all of 25 years old.
One of the reasons I hung up my fly rod last year.
 

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I fish a lot of skams. When the waters warm you have to plan to kill some fish. And that means not trying to put up numbers.
So you go fishing and use techniques that won't get bit? Or does that mean once you land a fish you cop a squat on the bank and enjoy a stogie or a pull off the flask?

Maybe hit the spring creeks and feeders that stay much cooler.
 

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I won’t fish. Can’t remember the last year I didn’t walk away before the hex were over because the water got too warm. Usually I can chase the hatch in a cooler section or another river. This goes for mousing, too. I always take a temp when I arrive and if it’s above 70 I leave. If it’s just tickling 70 I’ll wait and see if it cools. BTW, I always wade out to where the water is well mixed to take the temp. Near shore can give you a pretty inaccurate reading in either direction.
 

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My weather app defaults to Atlanta Mi then I select my location from there here in SE mi. Temps have been averaging hotter in the north lately than these parts which is crazy!
 

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I hold off unless I’m fishing for keeps anyway, you’ll still see all the guides, with boats full of clients from Grayling to Gates & all thru flies only on the Manistee. Last year I questioned one of the guides about it as the temps were 74 degrees, he said it was ok for him to do it because he was a guide & he knew how to handle the fish. He looked to be all of 25 years old.
One of the reasons I hung up my fly rod last year.
Very curious when and what stretch that was on. That's really unusual temperature for any of the flies only stretches.
 

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I usually only get a few nights a year to fish hex, so I fish when warm. I'll cut my leader down to ~25# test, horse em in, no net, no pics, no handling. If the fight doesn't go as planned and I suspect the fish won't make it (rare but happens), it'll go home with me.
 

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Spoke with an alumnus of the trout forums last week that reported that the streams north of GR were already cooked.

Time to finish any projects that need doing that you've been putting off.

If streams are already too warm with low volume and it's only June 8th, what's it gonna be like in mid August?
 

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Not enough water left to float a log.
 

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Very curious when and what stretch that was on. That's really unusual temperature for any of the flies only stretches.
I can’t name specific stretches on here due to forum rules but I assure you those temps have not been unusual over the last 2 seasons. M-72 to yellow trees was my usual general area tho I saw temps in the 70’s all the way up to 612. The year before was even worse, we spent more nights sitting on the bank with a cold beverage watching the fish feed than we did casting for them during the hex hatch. The flies only section of the manistee is roughly 4 miles from my house & im friends with all the TU & friends of the manistee river folks.

Thanks for calling me out tho, I appreciate it.
 

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Seeing high temps and floating trout keyed me in on this no no back in the early 90's.
 

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The best piece of Trout fishing gear I have ever purchased is a thermometer. Am quite looking forward to using it on some medium-serious walk-ins on otherwise warm segments in the U.P.

I don’t fish in hot weather, am not really into deliberate catch&release fishing anyway and thus rarely fish stream Trout around home in the Lower Peninsula. There are a few cold streams I want to try out but generally I am bored with all the smolt factory streams. Headwaters tiny Brookies also don’t really interest me, either.

DNR stream surveys from over the decades do sometimes reveal where the cold water is, if you dig into them.

Everywhere Trout live would benefit from true tree canopy cover adjacent to the flowing channel. Alder tunnels are not enough.
 

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My main trout stream never gets near that temp, so I don't have to take any breaks really. I do stop fishing some smaller streams closer to me and I don't explore new water as much, but at least I have one stream that I know will never get close to 70 let alone mid 60s.
 

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I can’t name specific stretches on here due to forum rules but I assure you those temps have not been unusual over the last 2 seasons. M-72 to yellow trees was my usual general area tho I saw temps in the 70’s all the way up to 612. The year before was even worse, we spent more nights sitting on the bank with a cold beverage watching the fish feed than we did casting for them during the hex hatch. The flies only section of the manistee is roughly 4 miles from my house & im friends with all the TU & friends of the manistee river folks.

Thanks for calling me out tho, I appreciate it.
Not calling you out so much as questioning the accuracy of your thermometer. The headwaters being significantly warmer than the water at Sherman is really strange, especially last year which was relatively cool and none of chronic warm stretches passed 74 except for a couple days around the Fourth of July.

I don’t know a lot of the TU guys or the Manistee guys but I do know the guy who is fanatical about keeping the fly shops in line when water is over 70. If the local shops had been doing it I would have heard about it. Lots of guides coming over from the PM in the summer and especially at hex, maybe that’s who you saw. Or just some kid trying to turn a buck on the side.
 
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