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Discussion Starter #1
I took a doe Sunday morning and have her hanging in the pole barn. I process my own deer (when I can anyway) but have not in a while do to other obligations, and buying a new place. The barn is not insulated or heated at this time. Do you guys let em freeze??? Best I could do now is wrap an old blanket around which certainly would not keep it from freezing solid, but might help. The only source of heat I have at this time would be a torpedo heater. I'll be out of the state for a few days so I obviously cannot leave that going. Opinions?

THanks
 

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Get it processed if your busy, its worth the trouble. I'm sure your wife has all kinds of projects for you since you bought that new place.
 

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Freezing won't hurt it. It will be very tough to skin. The temps. probably won't be cold enough to freeze it solid through to the bone.
It will be easiler to make uniform cuts if you do it yourself. Probably not much help--just my 2 cents.
Ken
 

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Mine has been hanging for a week, it will be fine as long as the temos dont get over 45 - 50 degrees. I'll let mine hang for at least a couple weeks before doing it myself. Ive been doing my own deer for about 18 years. If you left the hide on, which i always do it wont freeze solid, the hide will insulate it. Plus its easier to butcher when its partially frozen.
 

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It'll be fine hanging in these temps for weeks.
I'd skin it ASAP it was me though.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Kelly,
Why would you take the hide off? I've always been told the opposite. I just flipped her over and put her on the gambrel's from the hind legs... I.E. the skinning position. The water from the "rinse" process hasn't frozen on the floor yet.... but I wrapped her in that old blanket anyhow. I agree that It's alot easier to make nice cuts while partially froze...... just a little harder on the fingers;). Single guy here, so the honey do list is made by me:D...... Travel for my business keeps me from cutting sooner. I do not want to pay a meat switcher to cut up a plump 1.5 year old corn fed doe.... In bow season? Yes. When it's cold like this......
 

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I would let it hang and cut it in a couple weeks. At this point it won't make much difference as it's going to be a pain to skin anyway.
 

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I skin mine as soon as i get'em hung, comes off much easier and faster, the amount i have to trim off due to drying dosen't amount to a hill of beans. I would let it hang, it would have to get real cold for it to freeze solid. If you have ever tried to skin a deer that is partially froze----- it can be a pain..
 

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It is indeed a pain to skin a frozen deer. The only venison I've lost by letting them hang with the cape on is the hind quarters. Good to know, thank you.
I skin mine as soon as i get'em hung, comes off much easier and faster, the amount i have to trim off due to drying dosen't amount to a hill of beans. I would let it hang, it would have to get real cold for it to freeze solid. If you have ever tried to skin a deer that is partially froze----- it can be a pain..
 

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the amount i have to trim off due to drying dosen't amount to a hill of beans.
Have you ever tried covering it in plastic to keep it from drying out at all? It works for me. Just a garbage bag or two.

To answer the original question. I think it will be fine for a while. Its not likely to freeze for some time.
 

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A couple of weeks:confused:??? I'd like to here why. Not knocking ya, just curious.
My thought is that at this point, the deer is probably pretty close to being a deercicle anyway, so a few weeks isn't going to make a difference in terms of skinning it. The hide will help to insulate against any fluctuations in temps and keep the meat from drying out.

As long as the temp of the deer doesn't get over 40° that thing can hang for a month and be fine. The best tasting and eating deer I've ever had was a 2.5 yr. old buck I shot on Dec 10 during muzzleloading. I didn't cut it up until after Christmas. The temps hovered in the 20-30s the entire time. I usually try to give them at least 7-10 days hanging if I can (this time of year it's not a problem). If it's warmer out, they get quartered immediately, and then age either in the spare fridge, or in coolers if I'm out camping. The worst thing you can do is butcher while it's still in rigor mortise.

Here's a pretty good article on aging meat:
http://www.fieldandstream.com/article/Outdoor Skills/Deer-Hang-Time
 
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