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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A couple of weeks ago we were given a 3 1/2 month old female yellow lab puppy. She is going to be our family dog and hopefully my fishing and hunting companion. She is pretty much house broke, comes, sits, fetches, etc. as well as can be expected for her attention span. She will even go right into her crate when she is told.

What I need help with is when I put the leash on her as soon as she feels any tension she sits down and will not move. Walks up north we don't need the leash but walks in our subdivision its a must. Any suggestions.
 

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Obviously you are going to get recommended several ideas, here's my idea :)

Since you weren't all that specific on what your walking her with etc. I'll assume its a medium weight leash and a collar, possibly a "choke chain."

I'd do one of a couple things (just thinking of how in a couple months you'll be hanging on to the leash getting pulled around). Try out a harness instead of a collar. This may take some tension of her head/neck. Another idea I would try would be to leave the leash on the collar and have her "hang-out" around the house for a bit draggin it behind her, this of course would be supervised. Every now and then as your walking from room to room and she's following, pick up the leash and walk with her inside the house.

These are only my guesses/suggestions, not out of a book or anything of the sort. Good luck.

P.S. You may want to post exactly the sitiuation to give some more detail to the situation.

-Scott

 

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I would agree with Scott (FW). When supervised, let her drag the leash around the house or yard. Be sure to use with her regular collar - that way, if it gets hung up, she won't feel the increased tension of a prong or choker collar. Maybe early on she had some bad experiences with a leash or being tied out. She knows that if she hits the end of the lead, the tension kicks in. Was she on a choke collar before?

That leads me to my next point. The type of collar and placement on the neck are crucial when first teaching the dog to heel and walk on lead. The collar should be high up on the neck as there are more nerves and it will serve like power steering for the dog. I prefer to use a prong collar versus a choker as I feel I have better control of the applied tension. Learn how to use the collar correctly and you should have the dog heeling in no time. You need quick little pops, not long periods of tension.

Sorry I got off the original topic, but they sort of go hand in hand. Let me know if you have any questions.
 

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You might try using a long leash and running it down the back, then around the body near the back quarters then behind itself.
Leashed this way the pressure is on the hind end and soft part of the stomach - that allows you to keep them up if needed. Works real good to start out if you are using a long lead for training (25-50') while steadying her.
 

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Virgil,

There have been many good suggestions by the group and I am wondering if you have tried any yet and had some success. Seeing that the pup is still quite young, I imagine things will work themselves out.

Let us know. Once again, good luck.

- Jeff

(along w/ Grady and Bogie)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the tips, guys. We are walking around the house with the leash with lots of coaxing and praise. Still slow going out doors, but we are making progress. I hope to get to Gander Mountain this week and check out that book.

virgil
 
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