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Discussion Starter #1
I was talking to a friend of mine about fihsing some of teh smaller ponds, lakes, and rivers with a personal "boat". He is a kayak user and is talking about how that is the way to go. I kinda had my eye on the personal pontoons that are out there. I'm not really interesteed in a float tube. Any thoughts about the two? I would be flyfishing, and I'm not a "small" guy. Don't really wnat to go for a swim whiel false casting!

By the way...thanks back2spool....My wife loves the idea I'm looking for a new toy!
 

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Yaks are quicker. That's about the only benefit I see in them. :p
With a 'toon you really rarely have to swap your fly rod for the oar or paddle. Using fins you can hold position relative to the shore against waves and wind. Though I've yet to run into problems as some claim, I even use fins in running water. That's a huge plus in control.
Toons are also MUCH more graceful to get in and out of... especially if you're on the klutzy side like me! That, and the sitting position won't play 'heck' on your back.
Toons also rarely tip over. I've yet to see it happen and I know out west they run some pretty raging water in them.
If I were running tides I might consider a yak or if I was racing a 'toon. Other than that, toon hands-down!
 

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I purchased a Dri Fly boat last winter at the fly expo used it on the Ausable, the Pere Marquette, and at Stoney Creek Metro park... I love it. I found that if you have a hard time moving along the water fins work great but so do longer oars. My 9 foot boat came with 6 foot oars switched to a pair of 10 foot and the thing became twice as desirable. alot more stable than a yak.
 

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I bought a trout unlimited last winter a loved it. We upgraded from float tubes. We spent sun up to sun down in them. Took some getting used to but after that nutt'in but good times. you can get out very esay and fishor sit by the bank and have lunch.
 

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I have a kayak that I use in small ponds in the U.P. in the summer. I've used it on rivers and in winter, but never again. I'm 6-foot 200 pounds, and it's difficult to keep the circulation going in my legs and feet in a kayak. It's worse than an Italian sports car. Kayaking is fun, and fishing is fun, but fishing in a kayak can be a serious pain. Trying to land a 6# fish in a kayak is an incident waiting to happen.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the info. Any of you ever use a toon with a small trolling motor? Although I would like to use it on rivers, the majority of use would probably be on small lakes and canals.

What are the thoughts about being able to stand up and cast? I looked at some ot the different models, and that "feature" definitely increases teh price. Is it necessary? What are some of the features that are worht the money? What should I look for?
 

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Thanks for the info. Any of you ever use a toon with a small trolling motor? Although I would like to use it on rivers, the majority of use would probably be on small lakes and canals.

What are the thoughts about being able to stand up and cast? I looked at some ot the different models, and that "feature" definitely increases teh price. Is it necessary? What are some of the features that are worht the money? What should I look for?
Many use an electric trolling moter but where I live, they would make me register that danged thing!
Features?
- Easy to use and centrally positioned anchor system (and sharp serrated knife handy for emergencies)
- Storage area up the wazoo including well-designed side bags and solid rear deck.
- Good, adjustable oar locks (I like bronze)
- TIG welded aluminum frames that disassembles and assembles easily and without tools if you travel much with and to help in stotage.
- Light weight
- Low profile for less windage
- I like the overhead pulley system I have in the roof of my garage to stash it.
- Sitting position that's adjustable and allows for easy kicking

My old boat in the overhead:


I love the casting platform on my new 'toon. I do quite a bit of smallie fishing in the south and standing really allows one to see the fish and likely holes better plus it makes fly casting a whole lot easier.
 

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What are the thoughts about being able to stand up and cast? I looked at some of the different models, and that "feature" definitely increases the price. Is it necessary? What are some of the features that are worth the money? What should I look for?
To answer your question, a Dry Fly Float Boat can be custom made to meet any and all of your requirements. Additional customizing or accessories will not break your bank book. Many customizations, while the boat is being manufactured, can be done at no additional charge.

I have made boats that will accommodate a single (big or small person) or for 2 and 3 people. These can be made to meet your specific requirements or physical needs.
There is no need to go to a store or catalog and "try" to find one that comes close to what you want. Have it built the way you want.

Fixed or sliding floors, casting rails, physically impaired braces, specialized seating arrangements, front or rear motor mounts, storage bags for fly boxes or a weeks worth of camping gear, child and infant seats, etc. are just a few of the accessories that can be custom made. These are quickly installed or removed based on the trip you plan for the day.

Dry Fly Float Boats are a solid built frame. Drop one of the other boats to the floor and watch it rattle, shake and gyrate. Our boats are solid and weigh less than the others.

I have had guys who have purchased other brand boats, stop over for me to make customized accessories. There is no doubt why many choose a Dry Fly float boat over the others. You will never find better service and attention to detail. We take care of our customers and that's that!

What is recommended, is to stop by the shop at my house in Irons on the Little Manistee River and take a test float. Then we go to the shop and custom make one to fit your needs. Satisfaction guaranteed. No Chinese boats here. All boats and components are made here in Michigan so you know where I live if you ever have a problem.
www.dryflyfloatboats.com
 
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